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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311685

ABSTRACT

Background: There are limited data on long-term outcome and mortality predictors of COVID-19 from different parts of the world. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors of 90-day mortality in critically-ill patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 in Turkish ICUs. Methods: : This multicenter, retrospective study was performed in 26 ICUs in Turkey. All patients with confirmed SARS-CoV2 infection, requiring more than 24 hours of ICU follow-up were included in the study. Demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory variables, respiratory support, treatment types, and survival data were recorded. Results: : A total of 421 patients were included in the study. The median age was 67 (IQR: 57-76) years, and 251 patients (59.6%) were men. 90-day mortality rate was 55.1%. Factors independently associated with 90-day mortality were receiving invasive mechanical ventilation (HR 4.09 [95% CI: 2.20-7.63]), admission lactate level > 2 mmol/L (2.78 [1.93-4.01]), age ≥ 60 years (2.45 [1.48-4.06)]), having cardiac arrhythmia during ICU stay (2.01 [1.27-3.20]), receiving vasopressor treatment (1.94 [1.32-2.84]), positive fluid balance of ≥ 600 ml/per day during ICU follow-up (1.68 [1.21-2.34]), admission PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio of ≤ 150 mmHg (1.66 [1.18-2.32], and baseline ECOG score ≥ 1 (1.42 [1.00-2.02]. Conclusion: This study has shown that long-term mortality was high in critically-ill COVID-19 patients in Turkish ICUs. Invasive mechanical ventilation, high lactate level, older age, presence of cardiac arrhythmia, need for vasopressor treatment, positive fluid balance, severe hypoxemia and not having fully-active performance were related with mortality.

2.
Balkan Med J ; 38(5): 296-303, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438838

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the long-term outcomes of COVID-19 from different parts of the world. AIMS: To determine risk factors of 90-day mortality in critically ill patients in Turkish intensive care units (ICUs), with respiratory failure. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective, observational cohort. METHODS: Patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and who had been followed up in the ICUs with respiratory failure for more than 24 hours were included in the study. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory variables, treatment protocols, and survival data were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 421 patients were included. The median age was 67 (IQR: 57-76) years, and 251 patients (59.6%) were men. The 90-day mortality rate was 55.1%. The factors independently associated with 90-day mortality were invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (HR 4.09 [95% CI: [2.20-7.63], P < .001), lactate level >2 mmol/L (2.78 [1.93-4.01], P < .001), age ≥60 years (2.45 [1.48-4.06)], P < .001), cardiac arrhythmia during ICU stay (2.01 [1.27-3.20], P = .003), vasopressor treatment (1.94 [1.32-2.84], P = .001), positive fluid balance of ≥600 mL/day (1.68 [1.21-2.34], P = .002), PaO2/FiO2 ratio of ≤150 mmHg (1.66 [1.18-2.32], P = .003), and ECOG score ≥1 (1.42 [1.00-2.02], P = .050). CONCLUSION: Long-term mortality was high in critically ill patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in intensive care units in Turkey. Invasive mechanical ventilation, lactate level, age, cardiac arrhythmia, vasopressor therapy, positive fluid balance, severe hypoxemia and ECOG score were the independent risk factors for 90-day mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Respiratory Insufficiency/mortality , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Analysis , Turkey/epidemiology
3.
Tuberk Toraks ; 68(4): 388-398, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380064

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Respiratory virus infections may cause serious respiratory failure requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and the outcome in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) due to viral infections comparing etiological agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ARF patients with positive viral serology were retrospectively recruited. Cohort was evaluated with regard to subgroups as influenza and other respiratory viruses (ORV), as well as survivors and nonsurvivors. RESULT: Out of 938 admitted patients, 319 were followed as ARF and only 149 patients had viral respiratory panel results. In 49 patients with ARF, 52 positive viral results were detected and 47 patients with single positive viral isolates of either influenza or ORV were included. Among them, 62% had ORV with quite similar characteristics with influenza group apart from diabetes mellitus which was encountered more in influenza group (p= 0.02). Overall ICU mortality was 32% and there was no difference between the two groups (p= 0.42). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was independently associated with ICU mortality (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.04-1.51; p= 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: This study emphasizes to consider the possibility of other respiratory viruses for the cause of ARF with similar characteristics and mortality as influenza species.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Influenza, Human/mortality , Patient Admission , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , APACHE , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Turkey , Young Adult
4.
Eurasian Journal of Pulmonology ; 22(4):45-51, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-902761

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 had already affected the whole world before the pandemic could be prevented and resulted in challenges to the development of an efficacious drug treatment. Intensive care admission is lower than the SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome-CoV pandemics, although the rapid development and simultaneous contagion in society resulted in feasibility problems associated with intensive care units. The disease results in severe pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiogenic shock, or multiorgan failure, causing mainly lung and myocardial damage. Decreasing the viral load and providing supportive treatment for organ failures are the main principles of treatment in such patients. One should take care to decrease the risk of transmission of the disease to the stuff providing care and treating patients in the intensive care unit. Precautions should be applied to the greatest extent possible, especially during aerosol-producing interventions.

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