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1.
Laryngoscope ; 2021 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460230

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To understand the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the volume, quality, and impact of otolaryngology publications. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. METHODS: Fifteen of the top peer-reviewed otolaryngology journals were queried on PubMed for COVID and non-COVID-related articles from April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021 (pandemic period) and pre-COVID articles from the year prior. Information on total number of submissions and rate of acceptance were collected from seven top-ranked journals. RESULTS: Our PubMed query returned 759 COVID articles, 4,885 non-COVID articles, and 4,200 pre-COVID articles, corresponding to a 34% increase in otolaryngology publications during the pandemic period. Meta-analysis/reviews and miscellaneous publication types made up a larger portion of COVID publications than that of non-COVID and pre-COVID publications. Compared to pre-COVID articles, citations per article 120 days after publication and Altmetric Attention Score were higher in both COVID articles (citations/article: 2.75 ± 0.45, P < .001; Altmetric Attention Score: 2.05 ± 0.60, P = .001) and non-COVID articles (citations/article: 0.03 ± 0.01, P = .002; Altmetric Attention Score: 0.67 ± 0.28, P = .016). COVID manuscripts were associated with a 1.65 times higher acceptance rate compared to non-COVID articles (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 was associated with an increase in volume, citations, and attention for both COVID and non-COVID articles compared to pre-COVID articles. However, COVID articles were associated with lower evidence levels than non-COVID and pre-COVID articles. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3 Laryngoscope, 2021.

2.
Head Neck ; 43(6): 1890-1897, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to COVID-19, diagnostic delays and a surge of advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) is anticipated. We hereby evaluate patient and tumor characteristics before and during the early COVID-19 period. METHODS: Retrospective review of patients with HNC presented at a multidisciplinary tumor conference from May 14, 2020 to June 18, 2020 was performed and compared to a similar 6-week period a year before. Demographics, time to diagnosis, and tumor characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: There was a 25% reduction in newly diagnosed malignancies. Groups were similar in baseline characteristics, duration of symptoms, and time to diagnosis. However, median primary tumor size was significantly larger (p = 0.042) and T stage more advanced for mucosal subsites (p = 0.025) in the COVID-19 group. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest increased tumor burden in patients with HNC presenting during the pandemic, despite a similar time to diagnosis. This may become more pronounced as the pandemic duration is extended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Radiology ; 300(2): E323-E327, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099797

ABSTRACT

Vaccination-associated adenopathy is a frequent imaging finding after administration of COVID-19 vaccines that may lead to a diagnostic conundrum in patients with manifest or suspected cancer, in whom it may be indistinguishable from malignant nodal involvement. To help the medical community address this concern in the absence of studies and evidence-based guidelines, this special report offers recommendations developed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts from three of the leading tertiary care cancer centers in the United States. According to these recommendations, some routine imaging examinations, such as those for screening, should be scheduled before or at least 6 weeks after the final vaccination dose to allow for any reactive adenopathy to resolve. However, there should be no delay of other clinically indicated imaging (eg, for acute symptoms, short-interval treatment monitoring, urgent treatment planning or complications) due to prior vaccination. The vaccine should be administered on the side contralateral to the primary or suspected cancer, and both doses should be administered in the same arm. Vaccination information-date(s) administered, injection site(s), laterality, and type of vaccine-should be included in every preimaging patient questionnaire, and this information should be made readily available to interpreting radiologists. Clear and effective communication between patients, radiologists, referring physician teams, and the general public should be considered of the highest priority when managing adenopathy in the setting of COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Periodicals as Topic , Radiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
4.
Cancer ; 126(22): 4895-4904, 2020 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the wake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, access to surgical care for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) is limited and unpredictable. Determining which patients should be prioritized is inherently subjective and difficult to assess. The authors have proposed an algorithm to fairly and consistently triage patients and mitigate the risk of adverse outcomes. METHODS: Two separate expert panels, a consensus panel (11 participants) and a validation panel (15 participants), were constructed among international HNC surgeons. Using a modified Delphi process and RAND Corporation/University of California at Los Angeles methodology with 4 consensus rounds and 2 meetings, groupings of high-priority, intermediate-priority, and low-priority indications for surgery were established and subdivided. A point-based scoring algorithm was developed, the Surgical Prioritization and Ranking Tool and Navigation Aid for Head and Neck Cancer (SPARTAN-HN). Agreement was measured during consensus and for algorithm scoring using the Krippendorff alpha. Rankings from the algorithm were compared with expert rankings of 12 case vignettes using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. RESULTS: A total of 62 indications for surgical priority were rated. Weights for each indication ranged from -4 to +4 (scale range; -17 to 20). The response rate for the validation exercise was 100%. The SPARTAN-HN demonstrated excellent agreement and correlation with expert rankings (Krippendorff alpha, .91 [95% CI, 0.88-0.93]; and rho, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.45-0.95]). CONCLUSIONS: The SPARTAN-HN surgical prioritization algorithm consistently stratifies patients requiring HNC surgical care in the COVID-19 era. Formal evaluation and implementation are required. LAY SUMMARY: Many countries have enacted strict rules regarding the use of hospital resources during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Facing delays in surgery, patients may experience worse functional outcomes, stage migration, and eventual inoperability. Treatment prioritization tools have shown benefit in helping to triage patients equitably with minimal provider cognitive burden. The current study sought to develop what to the authors' knowledge is the first cancer-specific surgical prioritization tool for use in the COVID-19 era, the Surgical Prioritization and Ranking Tool and Navigation Aid for Head and Neck Cancer (SPARTAN-HN). This algorithm consistently stratifies patients requiring head and neck cancer surgery in the COVID-19 era and provides evidence for the initial uptake of the SPARTAN-HN.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Health Resources , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Triage/methods , Algorithms , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Reproducibility of Results , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons
5.
Head Neck ; 42(10): 2782-2790, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-645281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has reduced clinical volume with a negative impact on trainee education. METHODS: Survey study of Otolaryngology trainees in North America, during the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2020. RESULTS: Of 216 respondents who accessed the survey, 175 (83%) completed the survey. Respondents reported a universal decrease in clinical activities (98.3%). Among participants who felt their program utilized technology well, there were significantly decreased concerns to receiving adequate educational knowledge (29.6% vs 65.2%, P = .003). However, 68% of trainees still expressed concern in ability to receive adequate surgical training. In addition, 54.7% of senior trainees felt that the pandemic had a negative impact on their ability to secure a job or fellowship after training. CONCLUSIONS: Trainees universally felt a negative impact due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Use of technology was able to alleviate some concerns in gaining adequate educational knowledge, but decreased surgical training remained the most prevalent concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Canada , Career Choice , Clinical Competence , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Self Concept , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
6.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1543-1547, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597089

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has become a major public health crisis. The diagnostic and containment efforts for the disease have presented significant challenges for the global health-care community. In this brief report, we provide perspective on the potential use of salivary specimens for detection and serial monitoring of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), based on current literature. Oral health-care providers are at an elevated risk of exposure to COVID-19 due to their proximity to nasopharynx of patients, and the practice involving the use of aerosol-generating equipment. Here, we summarize the general guidelines for oral health-care specialists for prevention of nosocomial transmission of COVID-19, and provide specific recommendations for clinical care management.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Dentists' , Saliva/virology , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Dentists , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Mouthwashes , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Povidone-Iodine/administration & dosage , Respiratory Protective Devices , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
7.
Head Neck ; 42(6): 1179-1186, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-380347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed health care, challenged by resource constraints and fears of transmission. We report the surgical practice pattern changes in a Head and Neck Surgery department of a tertiary cancer care center and discuss the issues surrounding multidisciplinary care during the pandemic. METHODS: We report data regarding outpatient visits, multidisciplinary treatment planning conference, surgical caseload, and modifications of oncologic therapy during this pandemic and compared this data to the same interval last year. RESULTS: We found a 46.7% decrease in outpatient visits and a 46.8% decrease in surgical caseload, compared to 2019. We discuss the factors involved in the decision-making process and perioperative considerations. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical practice patterns in head and neck oncologic surgery will continue to change with the evolving pandemic. Despite constraints, we strive to prioritize and balance the oncologic and safety needs of patients with head and neck cancer in the face of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/organization & administration , Surgical Oncology/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/mortality , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Humans , Male , Neoplasm Invasiveness/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Program Evaluation , Reference Values , Survival Analysis , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , United States
8.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1629-1633, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-133574

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Testing for SARS-CoV-2 is important for decision making prior to surgery in otolaryngology. An understanding of current and developing testing methods is important for interpreting test results. METHODS: We performed a literature review of current evidence surrounding SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic testing highlighting its utility, limitations, and implications for otolaryngologists. RESULTS: The currently accepted RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2 has varying sensitivity according to which subsite of the aerodigestive tract is sampled. Nasal swab sensitivities appear to be about 70%. Chest CT imaging for screening purposes is not currently recommended. CONCLUSION: Due to the current sensitivity of RT-PCR based testing for SARS-CoV-2, a negative test cannot rule out COVID-19. Full PPE should be worn during high-risk procedures such as aerosol generating procedures even if testing is negative. Patients who test positive during screening should have their surgeries postponed if possible until asymptomatic and have tested negative for SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Antibodies/blood , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cough/virology , Diarrhea/virology , Dyspnea/virology , Fatigue/virology , Fever/virology , Headache/virology , Hemoptysis/virology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Myalgia/virology , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Preoperative Care , Quarantine , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sputum/virology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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