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1.
Methods Inf Med ; 60(1-02): 32-48, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331415

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The electronic health record (EHR) has become increasingly ubiquitous. At the same time, health professionals have been turning to this resource for access to data that is needed for the delivery of health care and for clinical research. There is little doubt that the EHR has made both of these functions easier than earlier days when we relied on paper-based clinical records. Coupled with modern database and data warehouse systems, high-speed networks, and the ability to share clinical data with others are large number of challenges that arguably limit the optimal use of the EHR OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to provide an exhaustive reference for those who use the EHR in clinical and research contexts, but also for health information systems professionals as they design, implement, and maintain EHR systems. METHODS: This study includes a panel of 24 biomedical informatics researchers, information technology professionals, and clinicians, all of whom have extensive experience in design, implementation, and maintenance of EHR systems, or in using the EHR as clinicians or researchers. All members of the panel are affiliated with Penn Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and have experience with a variety of different EHR platforms and systems and how they have evolved over time. RESULTS: Each of the authors has shared their knowledge and experience in using the EHR in a suite of 20 short essays, each representing a specific challenge and classified according to a functional hierarchy of interlocking facets such as usability and usefulness, data quality, standards, governance, data integration, clinical care, and clinical research. CONCLUSION: We provide here a set of perspectives on the challenges posed by the EHR to clinical and research users.


Subject(s)
Electronic Health Records , Health Information Systems , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans
2.
Healthc (Amst) ; 9(3): 100568, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320151

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic required rapid scale of telemedicine as well as other digital workflows to maintain access to care while reducing infection risk. Both patients and clinicians who hadn't used telemedicine before were suddenly faced with a multi-step setup process to log into a virtual meeting. Unlike in-person examination rooms, locking a virtual meeting room was more error-prone and posed a risk of multiple patients joining the same online session. There was administrative burden on the practice staff who were generating and manually sending links to patients, and educating patients on device set up was time-consuming and unsustainable. A solution had to be deployed rapidly system-wide, without the usual roll out across months. Our answer was to design and implement a novel EHR-integrated web application called the Switchboard, in just two weeks. The Switchboard leverages a commercial, cloud-based video meeting platform and facilitates an end-to-end virtual care encounter workflow, from pre-visit reminders to post-visit SMS text message-based measurement of patient experience, with tools to extend contact-less workflows to in-person appointments. Over the first 11 months of the pandemic, the in-house platform has been adopted across 6 hospitals and >200 practices, scaled to 8,800 clinicians who at their peak conducted an average of 30,000 telemedicine appointments/week, and enabled over 10,000-20,000 text messages/day to be exchanged through the platform. Furthermore, it enabled our organization to convert from an average of 75% of telehealth visits being conducted via telephone to 75% conducted via video within weeks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
3.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(5): 613-621, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to surge in the United States and globally. OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of COVID-19-related critical illness, including trends in outcomes and care delivery. DESIGN: Single-health system, multihospital retrospective cohort study. SETTING: 5 hospitals within the University of Pennsylvania Health System. PATIENTS: Adults with COVID-19-related critical illness who were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) with acute respiratory failure or shock during the initial surge of the pandemic. MEASUREMENTS: The primary exposure for outcomes and care delivery trend analyses was longitudinal time during the pandemic. The primary outcome was all-cause 28-day in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were all-cause death at any time, receipt of mechanical ventilation (MV), and readmissions. RESULTS: Among 468 patients with COVID-19-related critical illness, 319 (68.2%) were treated with MV and 121 (25.9%) with vasopressors. Outcomes were notable for an all-cause 28-day in-hospital mortality rate of 29.9%, a median ICU stay of 8 days (interquartile range [IQR], 3 to 17 days), a median hospital stay of 13 days (IQR, 7 to 25 days), and an all-cause 30-day readmission rate (among nonhospice survivors) of 10.8%. Mortality decreased over time, from 43.5% (95% CI, 31.3% to 53.8%) to 19.2% (CI, 11.6% to 26.7%) between the first and last 15-day periods in the core adjusted model, whereas patient acuity and other factors did not change. LIMITATIONS: Single-health system study; use of, or highly dynamic trends in, other clinical interventions were not evaluated, nor were complications. CONCLUSION: Among patients with COVID-19-related critical illness admitted to ICUs of a learning health system in the United States, mortality seemed to decrease over time despite stable patient characteristics. Further studies are necessary to confirm this result and to investigate causal mechanisms. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Shock/mortality , Shock/therapy , APACHE , Academic Medical Centers , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/virology , Survival Rate
4.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 9(3)2021 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158372

ABSTRACT

Biosensors represent one of the numerous promising technologies envisioned to extend healthcare delivery. In perioperative care, the healthcare delivery system can use biosensors to remotely supervise patients who would otherwise be admitted to a hospital. This novel technology has gained a foothold in healthcare with significant acceleration due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, few studies have attempted to narrate, or systematically analyze, the process of their implementation. We performed an observational study of biosensor implementation. The data accuracy provided by the commercially available biosensors was compared to those offered by standard clinical monitoring on patients admitted to the intensive care unit/perioperative unit. Surveys were also conducted to examine the acceptance of technology by patients and medical staff. We demonstrated a significant difference in vital signs between sensors and standard monitoring which was very dependent on the measured variables. Sensors seemed to integrate into the workflow relatively quickly, with almost no reported problems. The acceptance of the biosensors was high by patients and slightly less by nurses directly involved in the patients' care. The staff forecast a broad implementation of biosensors in approximately three to five years, yet are eager to learn more about them. Reliability considerations proved particularly troublesome in our implementation trial. Careful evaluation of sensor readiness is most likely necessary prior to system-wide implementation by each hospital to assess for data accuracy and acceptance by the staff.

5.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 9(1)2021 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028823

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the demand for virtual healthcare delivery and highlighted the scarcity of telehealth medical student curricula, particularly tele-critical care. In partnership with the Penn E-lert program and the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, the Perelman School of Medicine (PSOM) established a tele-ICU rotation to support the care of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The four-week course had seven elements: (1) 60 h of clinical engagement; (2) multiple-choice pretest; (3) faculty-supervised, student-led case and topic presentations; (4) faculty-led debriefing sessions; (5) evidence-based-medicine discussion forum; (6) multiple-choice post-test; and (7) final reflection. Five third- and fourth-year medical students completed 300 h of supervised clinical engagement, following 16 patients over three weeks and documenting 70 clinical interventions. Knowledge of critical care and telehealth was demonstrated through improvement between pre-test and post-test scores. Professional development was demonstrated through post-course preceptor and learner feedback. This tele-ICU rotation allowed students to gain telemedicine exposure and participate in the care of COVID patients in a safe environment.

6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(12): e2031640, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995811

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has required a shift in health care delivery platforms, necessitating a new reliance on telemedicine. Objective: To evaluate whether inequities are present in telemedicine use and video visit use for telemedicine visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this cohort study, a retrospective medical record review was conducted from March 16 to May 11, 2020, of all patients scheduled for telemedicine visits in primary care and specialty ambulatory clinics at a large academic health system. Age, race/ethnicity, sex, language, median household income, and insurance type were all identified from the electronic medical record. Main Outcomes and Measures: A successfully completed telemedicine visit and video (vs telephone) visit for a telemedicine encounter. Multivariable models were used to assess the association between sociodemographic factors, including sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and language, and the use of telemedicine visits, as well as video use specifically. Results: A total of 148 402 unique patients (86 055 women [58.0%]; mean [SD] age, 56.5 [17.7] years) had scheduled telemedicine visits during the study period; 80 780 patients (54.4%) completed visits. Of 78 539 patients with completed visits in which visit modality was specified, 35 824 (45.6%) were conducted via video, whereas 24 025 (56.9%) had a telephone visit. In multivariable models, older age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.85 [95% CI, 0.83-0.88] for those aged 55-64 years; aOR, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.72-0.78] for those aged 65-74 years; aOR, 0.67 [95% CI, 0.64-0.70] for those aged ≥75 years), Asian race (aOR, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.66-0.73]), non-English language as the patient's preferred language (aOR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.78-0.90]), and Medicaid insurance (aOR, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89-0.97]) were independently associated with fewer completed telemedicine visits. Older age (aOR, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.76-0.82] for those aged 55-64 years; aOR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.74-0.83] for those aged 65-74 years; aOR, 0.49 [95% CI, 0.46-0.53] for those aged ≥75 years), female sex (aOR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.90-0.95]), Black race (aOR, 0.65 [95% CI, 0.62-0.68]), Latinx ethnicity (aOR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.83-0.97]), and lower household income (aOR, 0.57 [95% CI, 0.54-0.60] for income <$50 000; aOR, 0.89 [95% CI, 0.85-0.92], for $50 000-$100 000) were associated with less video use for telemedicine visits. These results were similar across medical specialties. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of patients scheduled for primary care and medical specialty ambulatory telemedicine visits at a large academic health system during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, older patients, Asian patients, and non-English-speaking patients had lower rates of telemedicine use, while older patients, female patients, Black, Latinx, and poorer patients had less video use. Inequities in accessing telemedicine care are present, which warrant further attention.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telephone/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Adult , African Americans , Age Factors , Aged , Asian Americans , COVID-19 , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Humans , Income , Language , Male , Medicaid , Medicare , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Care , Sex Factors , Tertiary Healthcare , United States
8.
Ann Intern Med ; 173(1): 21-28, 2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-38773

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic challenges hospital leaders to make time-sensitive, critical decisions about clinical operations and resource allocations. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the timing of surges in clinical demand and the best- and worst-case scenarios of local COVID-19-induced strain on hospital capacity, and thus inform clinical operations and staffing demands and identify when hospital capacity would be saturated. DESIGN: Monte Carlo simulation instantiation of a susceptible, infected, removed (SIR) model with a 1-day cycle. SETTING: 3 hospitals in an academic health system. PATIENTS: All people living in the greater Philadelphia region. MEASUREMENTS: The COVID-19 Hospital Impact Model (CHIME) (http://penn-chime.phl.io) SIR model was used to estimate the time from 23 March 2020 until hospital capacity would probably be exceeded, and the intensity of the surge, including for intensive care unit (ICU) beds and ventilators. RESULTS: Using patients with COVID-19 alone, CHIME estimated that it would be 31 to 53 days before demand exceeds existing hospital capacity. In best- and worst-case scenarios of surges in the number of patients with COVID-19, the needed total capacity for hospital beds would reach 3131 to 12 650 across the 3 hospitals, including 338 to 1608 ICU beds and 118 to 599 ventilators. LIMITATIONS: Model parameters were taken directly or derived from published data across heterogeneous populations and practice environments and from the health system's historical data. CHIME does not incorporate more transition states to model infection severity, social networks to model transmission dynamics, or geographic information to account for spatial patterns of human interaction. CONCLUSION: Publicly available and designed for hospital operations leaders, this modeling tool can inform preparations for capacity strain during the early days of a pandemic. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: University of Pennsylvania Health System and the Palliative and Advanced Illness Research Center.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Decision Making , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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