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1.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 2022 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603944

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the world gained dramatic experience of the development of the 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Recent researches notice an increasing prevalence of anxiety and circadian rhythm disorders during COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the study was describing clinical features of circadian rhythm disorders and the level of anxiety in persons who have had COVID-19. We have conducted a cohort retrospective study that included 278 patients who were divided into 2 study groups according to medical history: group 1 includes patients with a history of COVID-19; group 2 consists of patients who did not have clinically confirmed COVID-19 and are therefore considered not to have had this disease. To objectify circadian rhythm disorders, they were verified in accordance with the criteria of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-3. The level of anxiety was assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The most common circadian rhythm disorders were sleep phase shifts. We found that COVID-19 in the anamnesis caused a greater predisposition of patients to the development of circadian rhythm disorders, in particular delayed sleep phase disorder. In addition, it was found that after COVID-19 patients have increased levels of both trait and state anxiety. In our study, it was the first time that relationships between post-COVID-19 anxiety and circadian rhythm disorders had been indicated. Circadian rhythm disorders are associated with increased trait and state anxiety, which may indicate additional ways to correct post-COVID mental disorders and their comorbidity with sleep disorders.

2.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-15, 2021 Dec 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592511

ABSTRACT

The Uttarakhand State, known for its Himalayan mountains, is a territory in Northern India that is extremely vulnerable to earthquakes, landslides, and floods. Therefore, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, currently, India is facing the dual challenge of containing a pandemic and responding to natural disasters. This situation can have a negative impact on the health and in the economic development of the region, leading to a long-lasting humanitarian crisis that can disrupt even more the already overburdened health service. In addition, it can pose serious threats to the wellbeing of the population as it complicates physical distancing and other COVID-19 prevention measures. It is of utmost importance to analyse the impact of floods, landslides, and COVID-19 pandemic on the health system of the Uttarakhand State, and how these crises interact with each other.

3.
Trop Med Health ; 49(1): 98, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581980

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) is a deadly infectious disease that kills approximately 1.5 million people per year and is among the most frequent respiratory infections in developing countries. Morocco has made significant progress in the control and management of TB during the past 30 years thanks to its National Plan for Tuberculosis and the continuous support of national and international partners. While tremendous efforts were undertaken to tilt the balance against the COVID-19 pandemic, new challenges resurfaced with regard to long-standing health problems amongst which is TB. The spill-over effect of the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted health service delivery globally, threatening to reverse years of progress made on the TB control front. In Morocco, this crisis highlighted deep shortcomings within the national health system and in the adopted approach to TB control. This article discusses national efforts to get back on track with regard to TB management, the multitude of challenges that co-emerged with the onset of COVID-19 and lays down key recommendations to implement in order to build back a TB control plan that is resilient in the face of health hazards.

4.
Trop Med Health ; 49(1): 101, 2021 Dec 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581978

ABSTRACT

Vaccines are the best chance to control the pandemic-unless leaders succumb to vaccine nationalism. Vaccine nationalism is a frequent recurrence, especially during a brand-new market distribution. The development of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines in such a short space of time is a testament to modern scientific abilities. It will also test the world's political will and moral commitment to end this pandemic. As desperate as the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccine nationalism is already setting a foundation for itself and is considered socially and economically counterproductive. Vaccine equity is not just a theoretical slogan, and it protects people worldwide from new vaccine-resistant variants. Understanding and anticipating the consequences is vital, and creating a global solution approach to avoid them. This article evaluates the common issues previously faced and the plausible ones during this pandemic. A few recommendations are made to warn and accentuate the reality of this dire matter.

5.
Clin Epidemiol Glob Health ; 13: 100960, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588157

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic that initiated in Wuhan, China, has been an international public health emergency since January 2020. India has been battling a brutal COVID-19's second wave since April 2021. The healthcare system was struggling with a substantial increase in COVID-19 cases when the lack of necessary resources further aroused a major setback. Opportunistic fungal infections, specifically mucormycosis and candidiasis have become a pressing matter of concern. Recent cases of aspergillosis have also heightened public alarm. Hence, call for an immediate response to this public health crisis is the need of the hour by establishing countrywide surveillance, diagnostic, and management system, as well as public awareness to alleviate the burden of COVID-19 and fungal infections in India.

6.
Clin Epidemiol Glob Health ; 13: 100920, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560163

ABSTRACT

In August 2021, the Marburg virus disease (MVD) outbreak was confirmed amid the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Republic of Guinea. This is the first time it is detected in Guinea and West Africa. Marburg virus is one of the world's most threatening diseases, causing severe haemorrhagic fever, with a case fatality rate of 90%. Currently, there are no vaccines and specific antiviral drugs for MVD. Technical teams and community health care workers that were set up as part of the recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak that was declared over on June 19, 2021, are now redeployed to support governments response activities of the MVD outbreak in the country. The MVD is an added burden to the fragile healthcare systems that are already overburdened with multiple reoccurring epidemics and the COVID-19 pandemic. Previous epidermic strategies are needed to contain the spread of the disease, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, so the health care systems are not overwhelmed. This commentary discusses the available evidence regarding the epidemic of MVD in Guinea amid the COVID-19 pandemic, and highlights the efforts, challenges to be prioritized, and provides evidence-based recommendations.

8.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 2021 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536147

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has become a global public health obstacle. This disease has caused negligence on mental health institutions, decreased trust in the healthcare system and traditional and religious beliefs, and has created a widespread stigma on people living with mental health illness, specifically in Nigeria. The increase of COVID-19 cases that have exhausted the healthcare system in Nigeria have brought further negligence to people living with mental disorder, thus increasing the burden of the disease on these patients. Overall, this article considerably highlighted the need for equal accessibility to healthcare resources, as well as the requirement of proper attention and care for mental health patients in Nigeria. This article discusses the challenges that surfaced because of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with mental illness and their implications, as well as suggesting necessary actions and recommendations.

9.
Trop Med Health ; 49(1): 93, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533287

ABSTRACT

Every year, about 4 million cases and 143,000 deaths due to cholera are recorded globally, of which 54% were from Africa, reported in 2016. The outbreak and spread of cholera have risen exponentially particularly in Africa. Coupled with the recent emergence of the Coronavirus Pandemic (COVID-19) in Africa, the local health systems are facing a double burden of these infectious diseases due to their cumulative impact. In this paper, we evaluate the dual impact of cholera and COVID-19 in Africa and suggest plausible interventions that can be put in place to cushion its impact.

10.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6798-6802, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530182

ABSTRACT

Viral infections have been on the rise for the past decades. The impact of the viruses worsened amidst the pandemic burdening the already overwhelmed health care system in African countries. This article sheds light on how the coronavirus together with the already existing viral infections, some of which re-emerged, impacted the continent. The strategies in place such as immunization, education, will have to be strengthened in all African countries to reduce the burden. Furthermore, governments can further collaborate with other countries in creating guidelines to reduce co-infection of the diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Africa/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/immunology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/virology
11.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512903

ABSTRACT

Afghanistan, a country challenged by war and conflicts, has been in a state of turmoil for several years. The prolonged suffering has brought many challenges to the country's inhabitants. Among these, food security is one important cause for concern. Food security occurs when people continuously have physical and economic access to adequate, safe, and nutritious food to meet their dietary requirements and food preferences for a functional and healthy life. Amid the pandemic, Afghanistan has witnessed a large increase in food shortages due to its dependence on neighboring countries. In light of current circumstances, food insecurity, coupled with political instability and the third wave of the COVID-19, have made it extremely hard for people to access daily provisions. Hence, people are left to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic with economic recession and poverty as the backdrop of the other health crises. To mitigate food security, international attempts are the required at this critical juncture. The aim of this article is to understand the causes leading to food insecurity and its implications in Afghanistan and to propose solutions that will improve the overall food security at the policy and implementation levels.

12.
Afr J Emerg Med ; 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499589

ABSTRACT

Malaria has become a serious public health concern in Burundi. An outbreak that has the potential to evolve into an epidemic has eradicated nearly as many individuals as the Ebola crisis within the adjacent Democratic Republic of the Congo. The government's delay to announce a national crisis, increased breeding sites as a result of flooding, and the presence of multi-drug resistant malaria have exacerbated the burden. With a concurrent COVID-19 pandemic, economic complications, and overlap of symptoms between both diseases, these challenges are complex, but not unfamiliar. Organizations such as Médecins Sans Frontières have carried out spraying campaigns, and the government is actively mitigating efforts to handle the pandemic. That being said, there is still a need to enhance preventive measures such as increasing technological capacity and epidemiological surveillance to better withstand challenges.

13.
Trop Med Health ; 49(1): 83, 2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477478

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc in the world from last year, and any further insults like Zika virus will surely bring the apocalypse unto us. In July 2021, Zika began spreading in India, mainly in the state of Kerala. Zika infection resembles closely COVID-19 and other arboviral infections, which might lead to delayed and misdiagnosis, further leading to underreporting of cases. Some of the feared complications of Zika include Guillain-Barré syndrome and congenital Zika syndrome leading to microcephaly. Thus, Zika virus disease (ZVD) has significant public health and social impacts. Since the trifecta of infectious diseases (host, agent and environment) are all conducive to the spread of Zika in India, there is a huge risk that ZVD might become endemic in India, which is especially dangerous in the backdrop of this pandemic. This has to be stopped at all costs: the main aspects of which are public health measures, vector control and early diagnosis, especially in case of pregnant women. The diversion of healthcare resources for this pandemic has albeit made this difficult, but we must do our bit if we have to overcome this situation.

14.
Trop Med Health ; 49(1): 84, 2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477477

ABSTRACT

India is home to the most significant number of tuberculosis (TB) cases around the globe. The COVID-19 crisis has deeply perturbed most of the essential TB services in India. Regulating TB is difficult in a densely populated country like India due to latent TB infection in millions of Indians, which can reactivate at any point in the future. Due to the ongoing pandemic, healthcare workers have been diverted to activities implemented for effective COVID-19 management, leaving a meager workforce to help deal with TB management. Integrating TB and COVID-19 to augment India's health outreach is the need of the hour to diminish the effect of the COVID-19 crisis on TB. Increasing overall testing capacity, active screening, implementation of strategies for easy identification of TB hotspots, and ensuring uninterrupted drug supply for treatment through heedful planning of local and regional distribution and transportation will especially help cater to the vulnerable population who are at a high risk of suffering from adverse outcomes of TB. Lessons learnt in the battle against COVID-19 can most definitely help in providing insights to fulfill the goal of eliminating TB from India.

15.
Trop Med Health ; 49(1): 69, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456015

ABSTRACT

Bangladesh, a low-middle-income country in South Asia is facing one of its worst public health emergencies due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The increase in the number of cases from the disease, since the second half of March 2021, can potentially cause the health system overload, and has, as one of the main reasons, the non-compliance with measures of social distance and the emergence of the variants of concern in the country. This increase in the contagion curve can also provide a favorable environment for the occurrence of more mutations in the structure and genome of the virus. Therefore, there is an urge to carry out genomic surveillance programs in order to identify, monitor and characterize these variants, and understand whether the vaccines currently used are effective against them.

17.
Confl Health ; 15(1): 70, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412291

ABSTRACT

The political and military advance of the Taliban, reduced healthcare capacity, and imminent humanitarian crisis risk exacerbating an already very serious threat posed by COVID-19 in Afghanistan. The continued rise of COVID-19 cases in Afghanistan appears inevitable, but poor diagnostic capacity prevents accurate case measurement, while vaccine provision is extremely limited. This letter highlights how the recent changes in Afghanistan risk exacerbating the COVID-19 and ongoing health emergency in the country.

18.
The International Journal of Health Planning and Management ; n/a(n/a), 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1409620

ABSTRACT

Abstract Dengue fever (DF) is a significant public health problem in the African continent. The primary prevention strategy against the disease is vaccination and entomological control of vectors;however, implementing such a strategy in several countries in the continent is far below what is necessary to control the disease. The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic further aggravated this situation and negatively impacted these measures, mainly the coverage of vaccination campaigns, due to restrictive measures to control the disease. Therefore, the most significant risk is that the incidence of DF in the continent will increase even more in the coming years, as a reflection of the negative impact of the pandemic on the control of the disease. To prevent another public health crisis, immediate and multidisciplinary approaches are required to address the epidemiological control of DF in African countries.

20.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 28(42): 59570-59593, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401068

ABSTRACT

Emerging from Wuhan, China, SARS-CoV-2 is the new global threat that killed millions of people, and many are still suffering. This pandemic has not only affected people but also caused economic crisis throughout the world. Researchers have shown good progress in revealing the molecular insights of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and developing vaccines, but effective treatment against SARS-CoV-2-infected patients are yet to be found. Several vaccines are available and used in many countries, while many others are still in clinical or preclinical studies. However, this involves a long-term process, considering the safety procedures and requirements and their long-term protection capacity and in different age groups are still questionable. Therefore, at present, the drug repurposing of the existing therapeutics previously designed against other viral diseases seems to be the only practical approach to mitigate the current situation. The safety of most of these therapeutic agents has already been tested. Recent clinical reports revealed promising therapeutic efficiency of several drugs such as remdesivir, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, azithromycin, lopinavir/ritonavir, chloroquine, baricitinib, and cepharanthine. Besides, plasma therapies were used to treat patients and prevent fatal outcomes. Thus, in this article, we have summarized the epidemiological and clinical data from several clinical trials conducted since the beginning of the pandemic, emphasizing the efficiency of the known agents against SARS-CoV-2 and their harmful side effects on the human body as well as their environmental implications. This review shows a clear overview of the current pharmaceutical perspective on COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , COVID-19 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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