Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 152
Filter
1.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 11(5)2023 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232283

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy continues to be a widespread problem in Pakistan due to various conspiracy beliefs, myths and misconceptions. Since the hemodialysis population is at a higher risk of contracting infections, we sought to investigate the current COVID-19 immunization status and reasons for any vaccine hesitancy among these patients in Pakistan. This cross-sectional study was conducted among maintenance hemodialysis patients at six hospitals in the Punjab Province of Pakistan. Data were collected anonymously using a questionnaire. A total of 399 hemodialysis patients took part in the survey, the majority of them were male (56%) and aged 45-64 years. A calculated 62.4% of the patients reported receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Of those vaccinated (249), 73.5% had received two doses and 16.9% had received a booster dose. The most common reasons for vaccination were "being aware they were at high risk" (89.6%), "fear of getting infected" (89.2%) and "willingness to fight against COVID-19-pandemic" (83.9%). Of the 150 patients who had not yet been vaccinated, only 10 showed a willingness to take the COVID-19 vaccine. The major reasons for refusal included "COVID-19 is not a real problem" (75%), the "corona vaccine is a conspiracy (72.1%)" and "I don't need the vaccine" (60.7%). Our study revealed that only 62% patients receiving hemodialysis were partially or completely vaccinated against COVID-19. Consequently, there is a need to initiate aggressive approaches to educate this high-risk population in order to address their concerns with vaccine safety and efficacy as well as correct current myths and misconceptions to improve the COVID-19 immunization status in this population.

2.
Inflammopharmacology ; 2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238140

ABSTRACT

The present review critically appraised the randomized clinical trials that compared mortality outcomes between intermediate- to high-dose dexamethasone and low-dose dexamethasonein patients with COVID-19 and reported pooled mortality risk estimates associated with these two dosing regimens of dexamethasone. The systematic searching of electronic databases was limited to randomized clinical trials that compared mortality outcomes between intermediate- to high-dose dexamethasone with low-dose dexamethasone in patients with COVID-19 requiring respiratory support. The primary outcome of interest in this review was all-cause mortality. A total of eight trials with 1800 patients randomized to receive intermediate to high-dose dexamethasone and 1715 patients randomized to low-dose dexamethasone were included. The meta-analysis of six trials revealed no significant difference in the risk of 28-day all-cause mortality between intermediate- to high-dose dexamethasone and low-dose dexamethasone (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.74). Similarly, the meta-analysis of five trials revealed no significant difference between the two doses regarding 60-day all-cause mortality (odds ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.74-1.26). The results suggest intermediate- to high-dose dexamethasone to be as effective as low-dose dexamethasone in reducing the risk of mortality among patients with COVID-19 requiring respiratory support. However, higher dexamethasone doses could expose patients with COVID-19 to an increased risk of adverse events, such as hyperglycemia.

3.
Eur J Clin Pharmacol ; 2023 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238139
5.
Drugs ; 83(7):645-648, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2324204

ABSTRACT

[...]the mortality reduction has previously been reported in the prospective meta-analysis [2] conducted by The WHO Rapid Evidence Appraisal for COVID-19 Therapies (REACT) Working Group. Nonetheless, owing to relatively scarce evidence, it is still unclear whether monoclonal IL-6 antibodies reduce mortality in patients with COVID-19, similar to the IL-6 receptor inhibitors. [...]large-scale randomised trials should also be conducted to establish the role of monoclonal IL-6 antibodies in the treatment of COVID-19. [...]among hypothetical long-term complications, peripheral neuropathy would also be noticeable [10] and may contribute to the broad long COVID pattern. [...]there is a theoretical risk of altering the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors during tumour disease management [11].

7.
Inflammopharmacology ; 31(4): 2077-2078, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298165
8.
Inflammopharmacology ; 2023 Apr 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Vitamin C appears to be a viable treatment option for patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of vitamin C versus comparative interventions in patients with COVID-19. The outcome of interest was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: The meta-analysis of eleven trials using a random-effects model revealed significant reduction in the risk of all-cause mortality with the administration of vitamin C among patients with COVID-19 relative to no vitamin C (pooled odds ratio = 0.53; 95% confidence interval 0.30-0.92). Subgroup analysis of studies that included patients with severe COVID-19 also produced findings of significant mortality reduction with the administration of vitamin C relative to no vitamin C (pooled odds ratio = 0.47; 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.84). CONCLUSION: Overall, evidence from RCTs suggests a survival benefit for vitamin C in patients with severe COVID-19. However, we should await data from large-scale randomized trials to affirm its mortality benefits.

9.
Journal of cystic fibrosis : official journal of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society ; 2023.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2277582
11.
J Gen Intern Med ; 2022 Nov 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267147
15.
Ann Pharmacother ; : 10600280231164500, 2023 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267146
18.
Lancet Reg Health Eur ; 25: 100567, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242315
19.
Ir J Med Sci ; 2023 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232083

ABSTRACT

We summarized through systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies the risk of mortality as well as severe illness of COVID-19 caused by omicron variant relative to delta variant of SARS-CoV-2. A total of twelve studies were included. Our results showed significantly reduced odds of mortality (pooled OR = 0.33; 95% CI: 0.16-0.67) and significantly reduced odds of severe illness (pooled OR = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.21-0.28) in patients infected with the omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 relative to their counterparts infected with the delta variant. Findings of lower disease severity following infection with the omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 than the delta variant are encouraging during the ongoing transition from the pandemic phase into the endemic phase of COVID-19.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL