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2.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 106(6): 1589-1592, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903692

ABSTRACT

The United Nations has declared Yemen as the world's worst humanitarian crisis with 21 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. Due to the convergence of severe economic instability exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, stifling war, and spiking food prices, the Yemeni people are at the brink of famine with women and children especially malnourished. Desperate to feed their families, civilians are forced to resort to begging, participate in child marriages, or plunge into debt. An inflated currency has significantly diminished the purchasing power of the Yemeni population, and COVID-19 restrictions have made acquisition of food and essential commodity imports arduous. Immediate action by global and local governments is essential to prevent the deaths of thousands of people in the wake of severe food scarcity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Female , Food Insecurity , Food Supply , Humans , Pandemics , Yemen/epidemiology
6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312566

ABSTRACT

Background: As a part of South- Eastern Asia- Pacific, Bangladesh has been following to adopt proactive non-therapeutic means to repress the spread of nCoV-2 just like other countries. As stated in reports of September, the COVID-19 pandemic has become very distressing in Iraq, a Country in Southwestern Asia Pacific reporting around 4,000 new cases every day and around 500 deaths a week. Method: ology: A descriptive, survey-based, cross sectional study was conducted among 1000 participants aged > 18 years old from Bangladesh and Iraq.The survey was conducted as an online survey distributed for the general population for a month. The questions were assessed using Likert-type response scale from 1 to 5 for almost all questions. Chi 2 , mean and standard deviation were used to present the data. Results: : There are significant differences between the mental health assessment, the country, educational level, hypertension and smoking. While the other variables have no effect on mental health. Approximately 99% of the participants said they had heard about COVID-19. More than 90% of the participants have stated that they know about COVID- 19. Also, more than 85% of the participants have claimed that they know the causes of COVID-19. Furthermore, participants (around 84%) were largely aware of the death rate for people infected by the virus. Conclusion: Mental health is mostly affected by the pandemic and need to be regularly assessed to keep the immunity competent. Poverty and lack of proper education are contributing factors in increment of COVID-19 cases and discarding about preventions.

7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312363

ABSTRACT

Ivermectin is an antiparasitic drug being investigated for repurposing to SARS-CoV-2. In-vitro, ivermectin showed limited antiviral activity and a COVID-19 animal model demonstrated pathological benefits but no effect on viral RNA. This meta-analysis investigated ivermectin in 18 randomized clinical trials (2282 patients) identified through systematic searches of PUBMED, EMBASE, MedRxiv and trial registries. Ivermectin was associated with reduced inflammatory markers (C-Reactive Protein, d-dimer and ferritin) and faster viral clearance by PCR. Viral clearance was treatment dose- and duration-dependent. In six randomized trials of moderate or severe infection, there was a 75% reduction in mortality (Relative Risk=0.25 [95%CI 0.12-0.52];p=0.0002);14/650 (2.1%) deaths on ivermectin;57/597 (9.5%) deaths in controls) with favorable clinical recovery and reduced hospitalization. Many studies included were not peer reviewed and meta-analyses are prone to confounding issues. Ivermectin should be validated in larger, appropriately controlled randomized trials before the results are sufficient for review by regulatory authorities.

8.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 41(2): 643-649, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616037

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a massive cutdown in outpatient urological investigations, procedures, and interventions. Female and functional urology (FFU) has been probably the most affected subspecialty in urology. Several scientific societies have published guidelines to manage this new situation, providing general recommendations. The aim of this study was to devise a robust questionnaire covering every different aspect of FFU to obtain recommendations on COVID-19 adaptations. METHODS: Delphi methodology was adapted to devise the survey questionnaires for male/female lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), pelvic organ prolapse (POP), chronic pelvic pain (CPP), and neuro-urological disease. Content validity, face validity, and internal consistence were assessed to establish the final questionnaire. This study was ethically approved by the Local Research Ethics Committee. RESULTS: A total 97, 59, 79, 85, and 84 items for female and male LUTS, POPs, CPP, and neuro-urology respectively were approved by the participants. Content validity over 0.70 was obtained which seemed reasonable content validity scores. Internal consistency obtains values of Cronbach's alpha was between 0.70 and 0.90 which was acceptable. CONCLUSIONS: The collective wisdom obtained through a global survey using validated questionnaires covering every different aspect of FFU patient management is necessary. We have developed a robust and validated tool consisting of five questionnaires covering the most prevalent pathologies in FFU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urology , Female , Humans , Male , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods
9.
Arch Public Health ; 80(1): 8, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605259

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged in late 2019, with the first case identified in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, on 12 December 2019. In order to perceive the comprehensive impact of this pandemic, we have to know that misinformation and denials about COVID-19 have surely exacerbated its diffusion and hindered the response against it. Turkmenistan remains one of the very few countries in the world that lacks reports about emerging cases of the novel coronavirus. Turkmen authorities claim that they have adopted all attainable measures required in order to combat the virus, asserting that COVID-19 has yet to reach their country. Despite the government's reported absence of COVID-19 in the country, rumors, media reports and independent sources suggest the spread of the pandemic in Turkmenistan. By mid-June 2020, the outbreak was referred to as being serious with patients suffering extreme health risks, and following its state of disrepair and unethical practices, many of those anticipated to be COVID-19 infected tend to suffer at home, discouraging any interaction with the healthcare system. The civil society in Turkmenistan, for the time being, takes full part of the government's duty in the process of informing and educating the public regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, and endeavors to keep the government and WHO accountable for behaving in such repressive ways that could lead to rather preventable loss of human life in Turkmenistan. Yet, efforts hang fire before unveiling the real situation, and Turkmenistan's government owning up to the negations and roaming speculations, not only regarding the coronavirus crisis, but every public-related issue itself.

10.
Ann Med Surg (Lond) ; 69: 102779, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466016

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has ignited the urge for repurposing old drugs as candidate antiviral medicines to treat novel challenges of viral infections. Niclosamide (NCS) is an anti-parasitic drug of known antiviral potential. Therefore, this study attempts to investigate the antiviral effect and safety of NCS on SARS-CoV-2 caused COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Randomized controlled open label clinical trial encompassed 75 COVID-19 patients treated with standard of care plus NCS were included as experimental group and 75 COVID-19 patients treated with only standard of care therapy as control group. Survival rate, time to recovery, and side effects were the main endpoints for the assessment of the therapeutic effect and safety of NCS. RESULTS: No significant difference between the two study groups in the incidence of death Vs recovery within 30 days of follow up(p = 1).Median survival time to cure in the NCS addon group was significantly less than controls (5 Vs 7days, Log rank p = 0.005).All the recoveries took place within 20 days in the NCS add on group, which is 10 days shorter than that in the controls (30 days), NCS add on treatment increased the risk of cure by 60% per day compared to control group (adjusted HR = 1.6,p = 0,007) after adjusting for the count of comorbidities. Additionally, two or more comorbidities reduced the risk of cure to 33% (p < 0.001).Male gender increased the risk of cure by 42% (p = 0.046). Older age group decreased the risk of recovery per day to 0.58 and 0.53 for 50-59 and 60+ years of age. Hyypertension (HT) and diabetes mellitus (DM) significantly reduced the risk of being cured per day to 0.56 (p = 0.003)and 0.65 (p = 0.039) respectively. No significant signals of safety in NCS add on therapy compared to control group. CONCLUSION: adding NCS to the standards of care measures increased the risk of the cure and had shorter time to stay in the hospital compared with controls., male gender increased the risk of cure, while older patients>40 years, HT, and DM decreased the risk of cure. Also, NCS add on therapy was relatively safe; hence, NCS is of clinical benefit for freeing hospital beds for more patients in pandemic crisis.

11.
Fertility & Sterility ; 116(3):e113-e113, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1427903
12.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(4)2021 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311408

ABSTRACT

Objective: To measure the mental health effects (perceived stress, anxiety, and depression) among health care workers and medical students in Lebanon during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and subsequent to the Beirut blast.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a self-administered online questionnaire was developed and distributed between late December 2020 and early February 2021 among health care workers and medical students via social media. The 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and the 4-item Patient Health Questionnaire for Depression and Anxiety (PHQ-4) were administered. P values between variables were calculated using χ2 test.Results: Overall, 98% of the respondents had a low PSS-10 score and 89% had a low PHQ-4 score. About 58.1% of health care workers and 69.0% of student respondents had moderate to severe stress on the PSS-10, and 48.7% and 46.8%, respectively, reported moderate to severe anxiety and depression on the PHQ-4. Prevalence of depression and anxiety was relatively higher among health care workers with monthly incomes < LBP 4 million (57.1%) and higher in women (39.9%) compared to men (17.2%). Furthermore, the prevalence of depression and anxiety was higher among health care workers traveling between different districts (63.0%) compared to those with residence and work location within the same district and was higher among females (65.4%) compared to males (34.6%).Conclusions: The resilience of the Lebanese people as well as their ability to adapt in the face of trauma, tragedy, threats, or any significant source of stress is remarkable and seen in their everyday lives, especially subsequent to the Beirut blast. However, the psychological well-being and mental health of health care workers and medical students in Lebanon should be carefully surveilled and recorded during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially within the ongoing socioeconomic crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Economic Recession , Female , Humans , Lebanon , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Resilience, Psychological , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
Int Urogynecol J ; 32(12): 3287-3291, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305145

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to translate the International Consultation of Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) bladder diary into Persian and validate it among the Iranian population with lower urinary tract symptoms. METHODS: After obtaining permission from the ICIQ group to translate the ICIQ bladder diary into Persian, we translated, back-translated it, and developed a Persian ICIQ bladder diary. Then, we evaluated its reliability and validity virtually via social media owing to some limitations caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. We calculated the content validity index (CVI) and content validity ratio (CVR) quantitatively. RESULTS: Thirty-nine participants completed the final version of the ICIQ bladder diary. Most of the participants were female (76.3%). For face validity, we interviewed 10 participants. Most of them considered it easy to complete the bladder diary, using a 500-ml measuring cup. Ten experts' panel determined the CVI, and the CVR. All ICIQ bladder diary criteria gained a high score, and all experts believed that all criteria of the diary were essential for patient evaluation (CVI: 0.89 to 1). Cronbach's alpha coefficient in all diary parameters was greater than 0.80 indicating high internal consistency. The test-retest reliability by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for each diary parameters showed a high score indicating good agreement between the first and second test diaries. CONCLUSION: The Persian ICIQ bladder diary demonstrates good stability and strong content validity among the Iranian population with lower urinary tract symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urinary Bladder , Female , Humans , Iran , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Turk J Urol ; 47(2): 87-97, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170529

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has been predominantly respiratory. This study aimed to evaluate the presence of virus in non-airborne body fluids as transmission vehicles. Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from December 01, 2019, to July 01, 2020, using terms relating to SARS-CoV-2 and non-airborne clinical sample sources (feces, urine, blood, serum, serum, and peritoneum). Studies in humans, of any design, were included. Risk of bias assessment was performed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy 2 tool. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews & Meta-Analyses) guidelines were used for abstracting data. If ≥5 studies reported proportions for the same non-respiratory site, a meta-analysis was conducted using either a fixed or random-effects model, depending on the presence of heterogeneity. A total of 22 studies with 648 patients were included. Most were cross-sectional and cohort studies. The SARS-CoV-2 RNA was most frequently detected in feces. Detectable RNA was reported in 17% of the blood samples, 8% of the serum, 16% in the semen, but rarely in urine. Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in non-airborne sites varies widely with a third of non-airborne fluids. Patients with bowel and non-specific symptoms have persistence of virus in feces for upto 2 weeks after symptom resolution. Although there was a very low detection rate in urine, given the more frequent prevalence in blood samples, the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in patients with disrupted urothelium or undergoing urinary tract procedures, is likely to be higher. Healthcare providers need to consider non-airborne transmission and persistence of SARS-CoV-2 in body fluids to enable appropriate precautions to protect healthcare workers and carers.

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