Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(6): 1039-1046, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tracing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission chains is still a major challenge for public health authorities, when incidental contacts are not recalled or are not perceived as potential risk contacts. Viral sequencing can address key questions about SARS-CoV-2 evolution and may support reconstruction of viral transmission networks by integration of molecular epidemiology into classical contact tracing. METHODS: In collaboration with local public health authorities, we set up an integrated system of genomic surveillance in an urban setting, combining a) viral surveillance sequencing, b) genetically based identification of infection clusters in the population, c) integration of public health authority contact tracing data, and d) a user-friendly dashboard application as a central data analysis platform. RESULTS: Application of the integrated system from August to December 2020 enabled a characterization of viral population structure, analysis of 4 outbreaks at a maximum care hospital, and genetically based identification of 5 putative population infection clusters, all of which were confirmed by contact tracing. The system contributed to the development of improved hospital infection control and prevention measures and enabled the identification of previously unrecognized transmission chains, involving a martial arts gym and establishing a link between the hospital to the local population. CONCLUSIONS: Integrated systems of genomic surveillance could contribute to the monitoring and, potentially, improved management of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Genomics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): 2065-2072, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560424

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has led to the development of various vaccines. Real-life data on immune responses elicited in the most vulnerable group of vaccinees older than age 80 years old are still underrepresented despite the prioritization of the elderly in vaccination campaigns. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study with 2 age groups, young vaccinees below the age of 60 years and elderly vaccinees over the age of 80 years, to compare their antibody responses to the first and second dose of the BNT162b2 coronavirus disease 2019 vaccination. RESULTS: Although the majority of participants in both groups produced specific immunoglobulin G antibody titers against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, titers were significantly lower in elderly participants. Although the increment of antibody levels after the second immunization was higher in elderly participants, the absolute mean titer of this group remained lower than the <60 years of age group. After the second vaccination, 31.3% of the elderly had no detectable neutralizing antibodies in contrast to the younger group, in which only 2.2% had no detectable neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed differences between the antibody responses raised after the first and second BNT162b2 vaccination, in particular lower frequencies of neutralizing antibodies in the elderly group. This suggests that this population needs to be closely monitored and may require earlier revaccination and/or an increased vaccine dose to ensure stronger long-lasting immunity and protection against infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(6): 1039-1046, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tracing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission chains is still a major challenge for public health authorities, when incidental contacts are not recalled or are not perceived as potential risk contacts. Viral sequencing can address key questions about SARS-CoV-2 evolution and may support reconstruction of viral transmission networks by integration of molecular epidemiology into classical contact tracing. METHODS: In collaboration with local public health authorities, we set up an integrated system of genomic surveillance in an urban setting, combining a) viral surveillance sequencing, b) genetically based identification of infection clusters in the population, c) integration of public health authority contact tracing data, and d) a user-friendly dashboard application as a central data analysis platform. RESULTS: Application of the integrated system from August to December 2020 enabled a characterization of viral population structure, analysis of 4 outbreaks at a maximum care hospital, and genetically based identification of 5 putative population infection clusters, all of which were confirmed by contact tracing. The system contributed to the development of improved hospital infection control and prevention measures and enabled the identification of previously unrecognized transmission chains, involving a martial arts gym and establishing a link between the hospital to the local population. CONCLUSIONS: Integrated systems of genomic surveillance could contribute to the monitoring and, potentially, improved management of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Genomics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
4.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(5): e04068, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242709

ABSTRACT

This case of secondary sclerosing cholangitis (SSC-CIP) emphasizes the need to provide follow-up care for patients that have recovered from COVID-19 in order to understand the complexity of SARS-CoV-2 associated sequela.

5.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(5): 1063-1071, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061091

ABSTRACT

Evaluation and power of seroprevalence studies depend on the performed serological assays. The aim of this study was to assess four commercial serological tests from EUROIMMUN, DiaSorin, Abbott, and Roche as well as an in-house immunofluorescence and neutralization test for their capability to identify SARS-CoV-2 seropositive individuals in a high-prevalence setting. Therefore, 42 social and working contacts of a German super-spreader were tested. Consistent with a high-prevalence setting, 26 of 42 were SARS-CoV-2 seropositive by neutralization test (NT), and immunofluorescence test (IFT) confirmed 23 of these 26 positive test results (NT 61.9% and IFT 54.8% seroprevalence). Four commercial assays detected anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in 33.3-40.5% individuals. Besides an overall discrepancy between the NT and the commercial assays regarding their sensitivity, this study revealed that commercial SARS-CoV-2 spike-based assays are better to predict the neutralization titer than nucleoprotein-based assays are.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing/standards , Contact Tracing , Female , Humans , Immunoassay , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
6.
EMBO J ; 39(20): e106230, 2020 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740598

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection is a public health emergency. COVID-19 typically exhibits respiratory illness. Unexpectedly, emerging clinical reports indicate that neurological symptoms continue to rise, suggesting detrimental effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that a Düsseldorf isolate of SARS-CoV-2 enters 3D human brain organoids within 2 days of exposure. We identified that SARS-CoV-2 preferably targets neurons of brain organoids. Imaging neurons of organoids reveal that SARS-CoV-2 exposure is associated with altered distribution of Tau from axons to soma, hyperphosphorylation, and apparent neuronal death. Our studies, therefore, provide initial insights into the potential neurotoxic effect of SARS-CoV-2 and emphasize that brain organoids could model CNS pathologies of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Brain/virology , Neurons/virology , Animals , Cell Death , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Organoids , SARS-CoV-2 , Vero Cells , tau Proteins/metabolism
7.
J Clin Virol ; 130: 104579, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fast and reliable detection of SARS-CoV-2 is crucial for efficient control of the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the high demand for SARS-CoV-2 testing there is a worldwide shortage of RNA extraction reagents. Therefore, extraction-free RT-qPCR protocols are urgently needed. OBJECTIVES: To establish a rapid RT-qPCR protocol for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 without the need of RNA extraction suitable for all respiratory materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Different SARS-CoV-2 positive respiratory materials from our routine laboratory were used as crude material after heat inactivation in direct RT-qPCR with the PrimeDirect™ Probe RT-qPCR Mix (TaKaRa). SARS-CoV-2 was detected using novel primers targeted to the E-gene. RESULTS: The protocol for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in crude material used a prepared frozen-PCR mix with optimized primers and 5 µl of fresh, undiluted and pre-analytically heat inactivated respiratory material. For validation, 91 respiratory samples were analyzed in direct comparison to classical RNA-based RT-qPCR. Overall 81.3 % of the samples were detected in both assays with a strong correlation between both Ct values (r = 0.8492, p < 0.0001). The SARS-CoV-2 detection rate by direct RT-qPCR was 95.8 % for Ct values <35. All negative samples were characterized by low viral loads (Ct >35) and/or long storage times before sample processing. CONCLUSION: Direct RT-qPCR is a suitable alternative to classical RNA RT-qPCR, provided that only fresh samples (storage <1 week) are used. RNA extraction should be considered if samples have longer storage times or if PCR inhibition is observed. In summary, this protocol is fast, inexpensive and suitable for all respiratory materials.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Respiratory System/virology , Specimen Handling/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Coronavirus Infections/virology , DNA Primers/genetics , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Time Factors
8.
Euro Surveill ; 25(22)2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-525969

ABSTRACT

We whole-genome sequenced 55 SARS-CoV-2 isolates from Germany to investigate SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks in 2020 in the Heinsberg district and Düsseldorf. While the genetic structure of the Heinsberg outbreak indicates a clonal origin, reflecting superspreading dynamics from mid-February during the carnival season, distinct viral strains were circulating in Düsseldorf in March, reflecting the city's international links. Limited detection of Heinsberg strains in the Düsseldorf area despite geographical proximity may reflect efficient containment and contact-tracing efforts.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Genome, Viral/genetics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Whole Genome Sequencing/methods , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL