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1.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 61(2): 277-290.e2, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263300

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A consortium of 8 academic child and adolescent psychiatry programs in the United States and Canada examined their pivot from in-person, clinic-based services to home-based telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aims were to document the transition across diverse sites and to present recommendations for future telehealth service planning. METHOD: Consortium sites completed a Qualtrics survey assessing site characteristics, telehealth practices, service use, and barriers to and facilitators of telehealth service delivery prior to (pre) and during the early stages of (post) the COVID-19 pandemic. The design is descriptive. RESULTS: All sites pivoted from in-person services to home-based telehealth within 2 weeks. Some sites experienced delays in conducting new intakes, and most experienced delays establishing tele-group therapy. No-show rates and use of telephony versus videoconferencing varied by site. Changes in telehealth practices (eg, documentation requirements, safety protocols) and perceived barriers to telehealth service delivery (eg, regulatory limitations, inability to bill) occurred pre-/post-COVID-19. CONCLUSION: A rapid pivot from in-person services to home-based telehealth occurred at 8 diverse academic programs in the context of a global health crisis. To promote ongoing use of home-based telehealth during future crises and usual care, academic programs should continue documenting the successes and barriers to telehealth practice to promote equitable and sustainable telehealth service delivery in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
3.
Contemp Sch Psychol ; : 1-15, 2021 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1018558

ABSTRACT

For the last decade, there has been growing concern regarding the rising rates of youth engagement in self-injury and suicide. The worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has elevated these concerns due to increased risk factors pertaining to social, family, economic, and health stressors, in addition to changes to typical routines and support systems. Unfortunately, there are many barriers to at-risk youth being able to access evidence-based mental health services including cost, lack of trained providers, transportation issues, and physical distancing due to the pandemic. Providing school-based prevention and intervention programs that promote social, emotional, and behavioral well-being helps to address many of these barriers. This article highlights important considerations to providing these services in a school-based telehealth modality. Symptom clusters that put youth at risk of harm to self are described. Best practice therapeutic modalities that can be disseminated in a school-based telehealth modality, such as cognitive behavior therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and mindfulness-based approaches, are reviewed. Although there is growing empirical literature for these school-based prevention and intervention approaches, additional research is needed to determine how to best support at-risk youth remotely.

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