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1.
Obesity Science & Practice ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2308709

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe first year of the Covid-19 pandemic saw drastic changes to bariatric surgical practice, including postponement of procedures, altered patient care and impacting on the role of bariatric surgeons. The consequences of this both personally and professionally amongst bariatric surgeons has not as yet been explored. AimsThe aim of this research was to understand bariatric surgeons' perspectives of working during the first year of the pandemic to explore the self-reported personal and professional impact. MethodsUsing a retrospective, two phased, study design with global participants recruited from closed, bariatric surgical units. The first phase used a qualitative thematic analytic framework to identify salient areas of importance to surgeons. Themes informed the construction of an on-line, confidential survey to test the potential generalizability of the interview findings with a larger representative population from the global bariatric surgical community. FindingsFindings of the study revealed that the first year of the pandemic had a detrimental effect on bariatric surgeons both personally and professionally globally. ConclusionThis study has identified the need to build resilience of bariatric surgeons so that the practice of self-care and the encouragement of help-seeking behaviors can potentially be normalized, which will in turn increase levels of mental health and wellbeing.

2.
2022 IEEE Games, Entertainment, Media Conference, GEM 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2286152

ABSTRACT

In the past decade, the gaming industry has seen a sharp rise in popularity, particularly in mobile gaming, and these numbers have only increased with the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Given the amount of user information being collected and shared by these gaming apps as well as the demographics of its users such as minors, it is critical to examine these apps' privacy vulnerabilities. In this study, we reviewed and analyzed 20 popular gaming apps' privacy policies and evaluated their explicit privacy protections or lack thereof. In particular, we examined if any specific privacy protections are provided to vulnerable groups like children and teenagers. Results found that although these gaming apps have privacy protections listed in their policies, only a few of them explicitly identify individual's consent and choice. Also, most of the privacy protections on minors like children and teenagers provided by these gaming apps are only at a basic level. Results from this study can provide guidance to both app users and app developers on the measures that each app is already taking on privacy protections, as well as identifying the vulnerabilities and potential privacy risks that currently exist. Furthermore, it can provide guidance for implementing appropriate privacy policies to protect users' personal data. © 2022 IEEE.

3.
Obesity Science and Practice. ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2173330

ABSTRACT

Background: The first year of the Covid-19 pandemic saw drastic changes to bariatric surgical practice, including postponement of procedures, altered patient care and impacting on the role of bariatric surgeons. The consequences of this both personally and professionally amongst bariatric surgeons has not as yet been explored. Aim(s): The aim of this research was to understand bariatric surgeons' perspectives of working during the first year of the pandemic to explore the self-reported personal and professional impact. Method(s): Using a retrospective, two phased, study design with global participants recruited from closed, bariatric surgical units. The first phase used a qualitative thematic analytic framework to identify salient areas of importance to surgeons. Themes informed the construction of an on-line, confidential survey to test the potential generalizability of the interview findings with a larger representative population from the global bariatric surgical community. Finding(s): Findings of the study revealed that the first year of the pandemic had a detrimental effect on bariatric surgeons both personally and professionally globally. Conclusion(s): This study has identified the need to build resilience of bariatric surgeons so that the practice of self-care and the encouragement of help-seeking behaviors can potentially be normalized, which will in turn increase levels of mental health and wellbeing. Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Obesity Science & Practice published by World Obesity and The Obesity Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

4.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 57(12): 2491-2501, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is evidence of increased mental health problems during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to identify the factors that put certain groups of people at greater risk of mental health problems. METHODS: We took a participatory approach, involving people with lived experience of mental health problems and/or carers, to generate a set of risk factors and potential moderators of the effects of COVID on mental health. An online cross-sectional survey was completed by 1464 United Kingdom residents between 24th April and 27th June 2020. The survey had questions on whether respondents were existing mental health service users and or carers, level of depression (PHQ9) and anxiety (GAD7), demographics, threat and coping appraisals, perceived resilience (BRS), and specific coping behaviours (validated as part of this study). The relationship between responses and coping strategies was measured using tetrachoric correlations. Structural equation modelling was used to test the model. RESULTS: A model significantly fit our data (rel χ2 = 2.05, RMSEA = 0.029 95%, CI (0.016, 0.042), CFI = 0.99, TLI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.014). Age and coping appraisal predicted anxiety and depression. Whereas, threat appraisal and ethnicity only predicted anxiety, and resilience only predicted depression. Additionally, specific coping behaviours predicted anxiety and depression, with overlap on distraction. CONCLUSIONS: Some, but not all, risk factors significantly predict anxiety and depression. While there is a relationship between anxiety and depression, different factors may put people at greater risk of one or the other during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/psychology , Models, Psychological , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology
5.
Transfusion ; 61(SUPPL 3):35A-36A, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1467626

ABSTRACT

Background/Case Studies: COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) is plasma collected from individuals who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection. The FDA Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) restricts use of CCP to high titer units only. The purpose of this study was to determine if donor ABO blood group was associated with SARS-CoV-2 antibody response and subsequent qualification as high titer CCP. Study Design/Methods: All CCP donations collected from April 21, 2020 to September 1, 2020 were included. The Abbott ARCHITECT semi-quantitative chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay was used to assess IgG antibodies to the nucleocapsid protein of SARSCoV- 2. The EUA-defined S/C threshold of ≥4.5 was used to qualify units as high titer. Results/Findings: A total of 232 CCP donations were evaluated. Donation characteristics stratified by ABO blood group are presented in Table 1. There were no significant differences in the distribution of donor gender (p=.166), donor age (p=0.342) and interval from symptom resolution to donation (p=0.770) by ABO blood group. The mean SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody S/C value was significantly lower in blood group O donations, compared to blood group A donations (p<0.001). There was no difference in antibody response between the other blood group pairings. There was a significant relationship between ABO blood group and number of high titer donations (p=.003), with blood group O donations having fewer high SARS-CoV-2 IgG titer units. Conclusions: Blood group O donations were found to have significantly lower levels of SARS-CoV-2 IgG nucleocapsid antibodies compared to blood group A donations and were less likely to produce CCP units that qualified as high titer. These findings may aid donor recruitment to promote availability of high titer CCP to meet patient needs. (Table Presented).

7.
Krisis ; 40(1):180-202, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1016538

ABSTRACT

At a time when monuments are falling and learning processes accelerating, it seems apposite to pay attention also to artworks commissioned by established institutions in order to give form to good intentions. This essay focuses on a commissioned portrait of female professors, on art (history) education, Dutch art policy and the former colonial (VOC) site that the University of Amsterdam occupies, in order to aide this institution’s desired process to become more inclusive. It proposes Art(istic) Research as a realm that can contribute a thoughtful positioning of research and universities in visual and public domains: a necessary ally. Since the essay was written in Summer 2019 (with additions), much has happened: the Faculty in question has been found to be the locus of ongoing sexual harassment. The student victims did not feel that the (internal) complaints procedures were safeguarding them. They went to the media. A first investigation found no systemic deficiencies. Since George Floyd’s death, we know better what “systemic” means. The university’s Board has admitted systemic failures. This essay is meant to show that art (history) and philosophy can jointly analyze organizations as a basis for necessary conversations, followed by action . During Covid lock-down, it became deceptively obvious how unimportant art is. An essay such as this, can hopefully show how art can indicate institutional culture: e.g. in relation to how embedded the principle to consult specialists is, even if this seems to be unimportant. And that is a matter of life and death. © 2020 Boom Uitgevers. All rights reserved.

8.
International Journal of Sport Communication ; 13(3):408-418, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-960990

ABSTRACT

In this essay, the authors explored Pinsker's conception of two pandemics, as reflected in the concerns expressed about the future of women's sport, prospects for female athletes, and the security of women leaders in sport as they emerged in articles published in national news sources. The purpose of this essay was to capture, in a limited way, how women's sport concerns surfaced in the media in the aftermath of a forced industry shutdown;to gauge reactions, assess real and perceived threats;and to examine how and whether this crisis inspired positive thoughts about women's sport opportunities for the future. Our work is based on the tracking of articles published in major news outlets about the impact of the pandemic on women's sport from March 10, 2020, to May 25, 2020. Readings of the collected articles revealed several themes that fit within the two pandemics framework: reactions to the loss of momentum in women's sport;fears regarding a reversal in gains made by women's sport in the marketplace as competition for limited resources escalates;concerns about women's sport participation decreasing due to cuts and delays in programs;and a focused commitment to gender equity and maintaining momentum, even in the face of significant headwinds.

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