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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324602

ABSTRACT

BAckground Severe COVID-19 patients account for most of the mortality of this disease. Early detection of severe cases of the disease remains a major challenge. Here, we performed clinical and laboratory profiling of COVID-19 to explore the early warning indicators of severe cases. Methods An analysis of the evolution during the hospitalization of clinical and laboratory findings from 78 confirmed COVID-19 patients and the associated risk factors. Results Of the 78 patients who were classified as un-severe at admission, 60 patients(stable group) were stable as mild cases until discharge, and the remaining 18 patients progressed to severe cases(exacerbated group) during hospitalization. Compared with stable patients, exacerbated patients exhibited older, higher BMI values and higher proportion of smokers. In the exacerbated patients, the median time from onset to deterioration was 7.5 days. Before the time point(days 0–7 from onset), we observed higher-levels of White blood cells(WBC), neutrophil, Neutrophi-Lymphocyte-Ratio(NLR), Lactose-dehydrogenase(LDH), D-dimer, and lower-levels of albumin in the exacerbated group, compared with the stable group. In the second week after the time point, the exacerbated patients displayed lower numbers of lymphocytes, CD3 + , and CD8 + T-cells, and higher-levels of C-reactive protein(CRP), erythrocyte-sedimentation-rate(ESR), Alanine-aminotransferase(ALT),Aspartate-aminotransferase(AST), and Interleukin-6. In the third week, the highest temperature and the proportion of febrile patients declined. All of the laboratory indicators gradually improved. Conclusions Advanced age and smoking history could be risk factors for COVID-19 progression. In the early stage, high-levels of WBC and neutrophils, with noticeably increased LDH and D-dimer, could be early indicators of the disease’s conversion from mild to severe, followed by elevated inflammatory markers, liver enzymes, and decreased T-lymphocytes in the next week.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324225

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has become a global pandemic. Studies about SARS-CoV-2 co-infection with influenza A virus (IAV) in the influenza season will contribute to the antiviral interventions of co-infected patients. Methods: : A cohort of 145 COVID-19 patients in Wuhan union hospital were reviewed and we found 2 patients were co-infected with both SARS-CoV-2 and IAV. Then we searched from PubMed, Web of Science and CNKI with combinations of the following key words: “COVID-19, SARS-COV-2, influenza A and co-infection” from January 1 up to May 1, and 6 studies were included in this descriptive analysis. Results: : Of the 13 co-infected patients, 2 were from Wuhan union hospital, another 11 were collected from the reports published on PubMed, Web of Science and CNKI. Of the 13 patients, the median age was 50 years (IQR, 40.5-67.5). Among the 13 patients, 7 (53.8%) were severe types. The most common symptoms among the 13 patients were cough (100%), fever (92.3%) and dyspnea (76.9%). 8 patients had lymphocytopenia on admission and all the 13 patients had abnormal radiological changes. The median time from symptom onset to hospital admission was 4.5 days (IQR, 2.75-5.5), and the median time of hospital stay was 17 days (IQR,15-20). Conclusion: Patients with both SARS-COV-2 and IAV infection showed similar changes in symptoms and radiological images with patients infected with SARS-COV-2 only. SARS-COV-2 co-infection with IAV can lead to more severe clinical condition but had similar hospital stay compared with patients infected with SARS-COV-2 only in the fast review.

3.
Curr Med Sci ; 41(6): 1096-1104, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404664

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study data about SARS-CoV-2 virus shedding and clarify the risk factors for prolonged virus shedding. METHODS: Data were retrospectively collected from adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in Wuhan Union Hospital. We compared clinical features among patients with prolonged (a positive SARS-CoV-2 RNA on day 23 after illness onset) and short virus shedding and evaluated risk factors associated with prolonged virus shedding by multivariate regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 238 patients, the median age was 55.5 years, 57.1% were female, 92.9% (221/238) were administered with arbidol, 58.4% (139/238) were given arbidol in combination with interferon. The median duration of SARS-CoV-2 virus shedding was 23 days (IQR, 17.8-30 days) with a longest one of 51 days. The patients with prolonged virus shedding had higher value of D-dimer (P=0.002), IL-6 (P<0.001), CRP (P=0.005) and more lobes lung lesion (P=0.014) on admission, as well as older age (P=0.017) and more patients with hypertension (P=0.044) than in those the virus shedding less than 23 days. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that prolonged viral shedding was significantly associated with initiation arbidol >8 days after symptom onset [OR: 2.447, 95% CI (1.351-4.431)], ≥3 days from onset of symptoms to first medical visitation [OR: 1.880, 95% CI (1.035-3.416)], illness onset before Jan. 31, 2020 [OR: 3.289, 95% CI (1.474-7.337)]. Arbidol in combination with interferon was also significantly associated with shorter virus shedding [OR: 0.363, 95% CI (0.191-0.690)]. CONCLUSION: Duration of SARS-CoV-2 virus shedding was long. Early initiation of arbidol and arbidol in combination with interferon as well as consulting doctor timely after illness onset were helpful for SARS-CoV-2 clearance.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Indoles/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Shedding , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Interferons/administration & dosage , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time Factors , Virus Shedding/drug effects
4.
Curr Med Sci ; 41(1): 51-57, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084616

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) occurs in the influenza season and has become a global pandemic. The present study aimed to examine severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) co-infection with influenza A virus (IAV) in an attempt to provide clues for the antiviral interventions of co-infected patients. We described two patients who were co-infected with SARS-CoV-2 and IAV treated at Wuhan Union Hospital, China. In addition, we performed a review in PubMed, Web of Science and CNKI (from January 1 up to November 1, 2020) with combinations of the following key words: "COVID-19, SARS-COV-2, influenza A and co-infection". A total of 28 co-infected patients were enrolled in the analysis. Of the 28 patients, the median age was 54.5 years (IQR, 34.25-67.5) and 14 cases (50.0%) were classified as severe types. The most common symptoms were fever (85.71%), cough (82.14%) and dyspnea (60.71%). Sixteen patients had lymphocytopenia on admission and 23 patients exhibited abnormal radiological changes. The median time from symptom onset to hospital admission was 4 days (IQR, 3-6), and the median time of hospital stay was 14 days (IQR, 8.5-16.75). In conclusion, patients with SARS-COV-2 and IAV co-infection were similar to those infected with SARS-COV-2 alone in symptoms and radiological images. SARS-COV-2 co-infection with IAV could lead to more severe clinical condition but did not experience longer hospital stay compared with patients infected with SARS-COV-2 alone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Curr Med Sci ; 41(1): 24-30, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082574

ABSTRACT

The role of corticosteroids in the treatment of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is controversial. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of adjuvant corticosteroids treatment on the outcome of patients with COVID-19 (n=966), using Propensity Score Matching to adjust for potential differences between the corticosteroids group (n=289) and the non-corticosteroids group (n=677). Analysis of data without adjusting differences in baseline characteristics indicated that the proportion of mechanical ventilation and the mortality was higher in the corticosteroids treatment group in total or severe/critical patients. The duration of viral shedding was longer in the non-corticosteroids treatment group in total or general/mild patients. After adjusting the difference between the corticosteroids and non-corticosteroids treatment group, the analysis revealed that the use of corticosteroids had no effect on the duration of viral shedding, in-hospital mortality or 28-day mortality.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Aged , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Shedding/drug effects
6.
Respiration ; 100(2): 116-126, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044350

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is still no clinical evidence available to support or to oppose corticosteroid treatment for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of corticosteroid given to the hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, single-blind, randomized control trial. Adult patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who were admitted to the general ward were randomly assigned to either receive methylprednisolone or not for 7 days. The primary end point was the incidence of clinical deterioration 14 days after randomization. RESULTS: We terminated this trial early because the number of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia in all the centers decreased in late March. Finally, a total of 86 COVID-19 patients underwent randomization. There was no difference of the incidence of clinical deterioration between the methylprednisolone group and control group (4.8 vs. 4.8%, p = 1.000). The duration of throat viral RNA detectability in the methylprednisolone group was 11 days (interquartile range, 6-16 days), which was significantly longer than that in the control group (8 days [2-12 days], p = 0.030). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in other secondary outcomes. Mass cytometry discovered CD3+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and NK cells in the methylprednisolone group which were significantly lower than those in the control group after randomization (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: From this prematurely closed trial, we found that the short-term early use of corticosteroid could suppress the immune cells, which may prolong severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 shedding in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04273321.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Pharynx/chemistry , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Virus Shedding , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , CD3 Complex , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Disease Progression , Early Medical Intervention , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Patients' Rooms , Pharynx/virology , Proportional Hazards Models , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Blind Method , T-Lymphocyte Subsets , T-Lymphocytes , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
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