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Journal of Higher Education Policy and Leadership Studies ; 2(3):180-187, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1904264

ABSTRACT

Higher education is facing the need for its leaders to adapt to an ever-increasingly virtual landscape. More than ever before, this became evident during the COVID-19 pandemic, which began in 2020. Previously-utilized leadership strategies proved less than effective tools for managing virtual faculty teams, and new, creative methods of leading people working remotely across wide geographical areas were launched almost overnight. Some worked;some did not. The purpose of this work is to explore the best practices for academic leaders to mentor, motivate, and guide their teams in virtual environments. The themes of creating a culture of trust, team-building and collaboration, and communication emerged in the literature as traits of effective leaders. Here, we apply those traits to personal experiences between March 2020 and May 2021 to propose a model for leadership in a virtual space. © 2021 The Author/s

2.
Transdisciplinary Journal of Engineering and Science ; 12:39-60, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1706929

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this research is to present a transdisciplinary research process which identifies the complexity of the issues surrounding COVID-19 using collective intelligence through transdisciplinary collaborative effort. Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM), a methodology for dealing with complex system design and development has been the key component of this research. Building collective intelligence to understand how factors affecting COVID-19 transmission and fatality and their relationships were investigated. Two different approaches were used to describe the complexity of the COVID-19 issue. (a) the Situation Complexity and (b) Cyclomatic complexity. The results showed that the complexity of the COVID-19 is difficult to understand and handle. © 2021 by the authors.

3.
Blood ; 138:2611, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582387

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The NHLBI MDS Natural History Study (NCT02775383) is an ongoing prospective cohort study conducted across 144 sites in the U.S. and Israel intended to establish a data and biospecimen repository to advance the understanding of MDS. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the study also collected data on COVID-19 infection and management. Here, we report a summary of COVID-19 outcomes from participants in this study and the impact of the pandemic on study operations. Methods: This prospective cohort study initiated in June, 2016 is enrolling patients (pts) undergoing diagnostic work up for suspected or newly diagnosed MDS or MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in the setting of cytopenia. Study enrollment was paused from Mar. 27, 2020 to May 18, 2020 due to COVID-19. Previously untreated pts underwent a bone marrow assessment with a centralized histopathology review at enrollment for assignment to a longitudinal cohort (MDS, MDS/MPN overlap, idiopathic cytopenia of undetermined significance (ICUS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with <30% blasts, or “At-Risk” (pts with sub-threshold dysplasia, select karyotype, or select genetic mutations) for follow-up every six months;or a cross-sectional cohort (other cytopenia or cancers) with no further follow-up. COVID-19 outcomes, including tests, status, hospitalizations and treatments for COVID-19, were collected for all eligible pts. Protocol deviations related to COVID-19 were also collected. Fisher's exact test was used for comparing the proportions of pts tested or positive between groups. Results: Of 758 eligible pts with available COVID-19 data, 507 (67%) were assigned to the longitudinal cohort and 251 (33%) to the cross-sectional cohort or are pending assignment. Among longitudinal pts, 74 (15%) had ICUS, 240 (47%) MDS, 47 (9%) MDS/MPN overlap, 11 (2%) AML with <30% blasts, and 135 (27%) At-Risk for MDS. The median age over all pts was 72 years (range=21-95) and 66% were male, 92% White, 4% Black, 2% Asian, and 2% other. Among 244 pts (32%) tested for COVID-19 (Table 1), 23 (9%) were positive. Twelve (>50% of the positive pts) were in Wisconsin, California (CA), and Missouri (Figure 1), with 8 identified from Sep. to Dec. 2020, which overlaps with third waves of COVID-19 reported in CA and in the Midwest. Tests from 17 (74%) of the 23 pts were based on a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The proportion of pts positive were similar between pooled disease (ICUS, MDS, MDS/MPN, AML <30%), At-Risk, and cross-sectional groups (8%, 8%, 16%, respectively;Table 2) but the proportions tested differed significantly (39%, 28%, and 25%, respectively, p=0.004). Among all positive pts, 21 (91%) are recovering or have recovered (16 with sequelae), 1 (4%) died, and 1 outcome is unknown (Table 1). The one participant who died had MDS with excess blasts-1 (MDS-EB1, 5-9% blasts). Eight pts (35% of positive pts) required hospitalization (median duration of 7 days (range=2-17)) or treatment (tx) in response to COVID-19, 7 of whom required both. In the 8 pts who required tx for COVID-19, 4 reported Remdesivir-use, 3 of whom were diagnosed with MDS or MDS/MPN overlap. The study monthly accrual rates were similar when compared pre- vs. post-study pause (23 vs. 22 pts, respectively) but the rate of missed follow-up visits increased from 5% to 11% post-pause. About half (49%) of the 144 COVID-19-related study deviations occurred during the months the study was paused. Conclusions: In this analysis of 758 pts with MDS and related conditions, the largest reported for these diagnoses, the COVID-19 mortality rate (13%) in MDS was lower than has been reported in a smaller (n=61) case study (39%, Feld et al Blood 2020) but is similar to the rates for MDS observed annually each year prior to study pause (range=11-19%) and to the rate reported in a larger (n=2186) observational study of cancer patients (16%, Rivera et al Cancer Discov 2020). Infection rates were similar across disease groups. The pandemic also resulted in substantial study-specific challenges, including incre sed rate of deviations, the study being paused, and difficulty sourcing material for biospecimen processing. Data on vaccine efficacy and rates of pts with long-haul symptoms post-COVID may be of interest in future work. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Padron: BMS: Research Funding;Kura: Research Funding;Taiho: Honoraria;Stemline: Honoraria;Blueprint: Honoraria;Incyte: Research Funding. Komrokji: Novartis: Honoraria;Geron: Honoraria;Acceleron: Honoraria;Agios: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Abbvie: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;JAZZ: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;BMS: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau. Saber: Govt. COI: Other. Al Baghdadi: Bristol-Myers Squibb: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;AstraZeneca: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company;Epizyme: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company;Heron Therapeutics: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company;Morphosys: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Cardinal Health: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. DeZern: Taiho: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Bristol-Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Takeda: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Sekeres: Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Takeda/Millenium: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.

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