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1.
Wiener klinische Wochenschrift ; : 1-7, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1863916

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic caused an important reduction in surgical activities during the first wave. Aim of this retrospective time-trend analysis was to examine whether also during the second wave in fall and winter 2020/2021 surgical interventions decreased. Methods Absolut numbers and types of surgeries in a tertiary university hospital during the second COVID-19 wave in fall/winter 2020/2021 were collected from the surgical planning software and compared with the same time frame over the last 5 years. In a second step, the reduction of surgical interventions during the second wave was compared with the reduction of surgical procedures during the first wave in spring 2020 at the same hospital. Results Despite a higher 7‑day incidence of COVID-19 infection and a higher number of patients needing ICU treatment during the second wave, the reduction of surgical interventions was 3.22% compared to 65.29% during the first wave (p < 0.0001). Elective surgical interventions decreased by 88.63% during the first wave compared to 1.79% during the second wave (p < 0.0001). Emergency and oncological interventions decreased by 35.17% during the first wave compared to 5.15% during the second wave (p : 0.0007) and 47.59% compared to 3.89% (p < 0.0001), respectively. Surgical activity reduction in our institution was less pronounced despite higher occupancy of ICU beds during the second COVID-19 wave in fall/winter 2020/2021. Conclusion Better understanding of the disease, adequate supply of disposables and improved interdisciplinary day by day management of surgical and ICU resources may have contributed to this improvement.

2.
Wien Klin Wochenschr ; 2022 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858997

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic caused an important reduction in surgical activities during the first wave. Aim of this retrospective time-trend analysis was to examine whether also during the second wave in fall and winter 2020/2021 surgical interventions decreased. METHODS: Absolut numbers and types of surgeries in a tertiary university hospital during the second COVID-19 wave in fall/winter 2020/2021 were collected from the surgical planning software and compared with the same time frame over the last 5 years. In a second step, the reduction of surgical interventions during the second wave was compared with the reduction of surgical procedures during the first wave in spring 2020 at the same hospital. RESULTS: Despite a higher 7­day incidence of COVID-19 infection and a higher number of patients needing ICU treatment during the second wave, the reduction of surgical interventions was 3.22% compared to 65.29% during the first wave (p < 0.0001). Elective surgical interventions decreased by 88.63% during the first wave compared to 1.79% during the second wave (p < 0.0001). Emergency and oncological interventions decreased by 35.17% during the first wave compared to 5.15% during the second wave (p : 0.0007) and 47.59% compared to 3.89% (p < 0.0001), respectively. Surgical activity reduction in our institution was less pronounced despite higher occupancy of ICU beds during the second COVID-19 wave in fall/winter 2020/2021. CONCLUSION: Better understanding of the disease, adequate supply of disposables and improved interdisciplinary day by day management of surgical and ICU resources may have contributed to this improvement.

3.
Transplantation ; 106(7): 1450-1454, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784436

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transplantation activity during the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was severely affected worldwide. This retrospective analysis aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on organ donations and transplantations in the Eurotransplant region during the first 12 mo of the pandemic. Specifically, we compared donor and transplantation numbers during both waves to determine whether transplant systems adapted to this new reality. METHODS: All reported organ donations and transplantations from March 1, 2015, to February 28, 2021, were collected from the Eurotransplant International Foundation registry. The observation period from 2020 to 2021 was divided into three 4-mo periods, which were then compared with the corresponding periods of the preceding 5 y. COVID-19 cases for Eurotransplant countries were retrieved from the OurWorldInData.org database. RESULTS: Overall, the number of organ donors decreased by 18.3% (P < 0.0001) and the number of organ transplantations by 12.5% (P > 0.0001) compared with previous years. Pancreas transplantation was the most affected, followed by kidney, liver, heart, and lung transplant. In detail, during period 1, the number of organ donors decreased by 26.2% (P < 0.0001) and the number of organ transplantations by 16.5% (P < 0.0001), in period 2 by 5.5% (P < 0.0091) and 4.9% (P < 0.0001), and in period 3 by 23.1% (P < 0.0001) and 16.4% (P < 0.0001), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Organ donation and transplantation decreased drastically also during the second wave; however, despite the severity of the second wave, the decline was comparable with that of the first wave.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Tissue Donors
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 625582, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365584

ABSTRACT

Innsbruck Medical University Hospital, Austria, provides the highest level of care for a region of approximately 1.8 million people. During the early COVID-19 outbreak in spring 2020 surgical activity was drastically reduced with the prime goal of preserving hospital capacities, especially intensive care beds. We conducted a retrospective analysis of surgical activities performed at Innsbruck Medical University Hospital during the lockdown period from March 15 to April 14, 2020 and compared these activities to the same period during the previous 5 years. Total surgical activity was reduced by 65.4% compared to the same period during the previous 5 years (p < 0.001); elective surgeries were reduced by 88.7%, acute surgeries by 35.3% and oncological surgeries by 47.8% compared to the previous 5 years (all p < 0.001). This dramatic decrease in acute and oncological surgeries can most likely be ascribed to the fact that many patients avoided health care facilities because of the strict stay-at-home policy and/or the fear of contracting SARS-CoV-2 in the hospital. In view of future waves, the population should be encouraged to seek medical help for acute symptoms and to attend cancer screening programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Austria , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitals, University , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Br J Anaesth ; 126(3): 590-598, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965444

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients present with a hypercoagulable state with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular thrombosis, for which hypofibrinolysis might be an important contributing factor. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 20 critically ill COVID-19 patients at Innsbruck Medical University Hospital whose coagulation function was tested with ClotPro® and compared with that of 60 healthy individuals at Augsburg University Clinic. ClotPro is a viscoelastic whole blood coagulation testing device. It includes the TPA test, which uses tissue factor (TF)-activated whole blood with added recombinant tissue-derived plasminogen activator (r-tPA) to induce fibrinolysis. For this purpose, the lysis time (LT) is measured as the time from when maximum clot firmness (MCF) is reached until MCF falls by 50%. We compared COVID-19 patients with prolonged LT in the TPA test and those with normal LT. RESULTS: Critically ill COVID-19 patients showed hypercoagulability in ClotPro assays. MCF was higher in the EX test (TF-activated assay), IN test (ellagic acid-activated assay), and FIB test (functional fibrinogen assay) with decreased maximum lysis (ML) in the EX test (hypofibrinolysis) and highly prolonged TPA test LT (decreased fibrinolytic response), as compared with healthy persons. COVID-19 patients with decreased fibrinolytic response showed higher fibrinogen levels, higher thrombocyte count, higher C-reactive protein levels, and decreased ML in the EX test and IN test. CONCLUSION: Critically ill COVID-19 patients have impaired fibrinolysis. This hypofibrinolytic state could be at least partially dependent on a decreased fibrinolytic response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Fibrinolysis/drug effects , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Blood Coagulation Tests/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fibrinolysis/physiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage
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