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1.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295743

ABSTRACT

Objective We examine the feasibility of an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-powered clinical decision support system (CDSS), which combines the operationalized 2016 Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments guidelines with a neural-network based individualized treatment remission prediction. Methods Due to COVID-19, the study was adapted to be completed entirely at a distance. Seven physicians recruited outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) as per DSM-V criteria. Patients completed a minimum of one visit without the CDSS (baseline) and two subsequent visits where the CDSS was used by the physician (visit 1 and 2). The primary outcome of interest was change in session length after CDSS introduction, as a proxy for feasibility. Feasibility and acceptability data were collected through self-report questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Results Seventeen patients enrolled in the study;14 completed. There was no significant difference between appointment length between visits (introduction of the tool did not increase session length). 92.31% of patients and 71.43% of physicians felt that the tool was easy to use. 61.54% of the patients and 71.43% of the physicians rated that they trusted the CDSS. 46.15% of patients felt that the patient-clinician relationship significantly or somewhat improved, while the other 53.85% felt that it did not change. Conclusions Our results confirm the primary hypothesis that the integration of the tool does not increase appointment length. Findings suggest the CDSS is easy to use and may have some positive effects on the patient-physician relationship. The CDSS is feasible and ready for effectiveness studies.

2.
JMIR Form Res ; 5(10): e31862, 2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484964

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Approximately two-thirds of patients with major depressive disorder do not achieve remission during their first treatment. There has been increasing interest in the use of digital, artificial intelligence-powered clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) to assist physicians in their treatment selection and management, improving the personalization and use of best practices such as measurement-based care. Previous literature shows that for digital mental health tools to be successful, the tool must be easy for patients and physicians to use and feasible within existing clinical workflows. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine the feasibility of an artificial intelligence-powered CDSS, which combines the operationalized 2016 Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments guidelines with a neural network-based individualized treatment remission prediction. METHODS: Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, the study was adapted to be completed entirely remotely. A total of 7 physicians recruited outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria. Patients completed a minimum of one visit without the CDSS (baseline) and 2 subsequent visits where the CDSS was used by the physician (visits 1 and 2). The primary outcome of interest was change in appointment length after the introduction of the CDSS as a proxy for feasibility. Feasibility and acceptability data were collected through self-report questionnaires and semistructured interviews. RESULTS: Data were collected between January and November 2020. A total of 17 patients were enrolled in the study; of the 17 patients, 14 (82%) completed the study. There was no significant difference in appointment length between visits (introduction of the tool did not increase appointment length; F2,24=0.805; mean squared error 58.08; P=.46). In total, 92% (12/13) of patients and 71% (5/7) of physicians felt that the tool was easy to use; 62% (8/13) of patients and 71% (5/7) of physicians rated that they trusted the CDSS. Of the 13 patients, 6 (46%) felt that the patient-clinician relationship significantly or somewhat improved, whereas 7 (54%) felt that it did not change. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirm that the integration of the tool does not significantly increase appointment length and suggest that the CDSS is easy to use and may have positive effects on the patient-physician relationship for some patients. The CDSS is feasible and ready for effectiveness studies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04061642; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04061642.

3.
Anesth Analg ; 131(1): 55-60, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599935

ABSTRACT

Since the first recognition of a cluster of novel respiratory viral infections in China in late December 2019, intensivists in the United States have watched with growing concern as infections with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus-now named coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19)-have spread to hospitals in the United States. Because COVID-19 is extremely transmissible and can progress to a severe form of respiratory failure, the potential to overwhelm available critical care resources is high and critical care management of COVID-19 patients has been thrust into the spotlight. COVID-19 arrived in the United States in January and, as anticipated, has dramatically increased the usage of critical care resources. Three of the hardest-hit cities have been Seattle, New York City, and Chicago with a combined total of over 14,000 cases as of March 23, 2020.In this special article, we describe initial clinical impressions of critical care of COVID-19 in these areas, with attention to clinical presentation, laboratory values, organ system effects, treatment strategies, and resource management. We highlight clinical observations that align with or differ from already published reports. These impressions represent only the early empiric experience of the authors and are not intended to serve as recommendations or guidelines for practice, but rather as a starting point for intensivists preparing to address COVID-19 when it arrives in their community.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Chicago , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Critical Care/trends , Health Resources , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Laboratories , New York City , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Reference Values , Washington
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