Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311150

ABSTRACT

Aim: As a follow-up to the international survey conducted in April 2020, this survey aims to provide a situational snapshot of the COVID-19 impact on nuclear medicine services worldwide, one year later. The survey was designed to determine the impact of the pandemic at two specific time-points: June and October 2020 and compare them to the previously collected data. Materials: and Methods: A web-based questionnaire, in the same format as the April 2020 survey was disseminated to nuclear medicine facilities worldwide. Survey data was collected using a secure software platform hosted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA);it was made available for 6 weeks, from November 23 to December 31, 2020. Results: : From 505 replies from 96 countries, data was extracted from 355 questionnaires (of which 338 were fully completed). The responses came from centres evenly distributed in different regions of the world and with different income status. Regional differences and challenges across the world were identified and analysed. Globally, the volume of nuclear medicine procedures decreased by 73.3% in June 2020 and 56.9% in October 2020. Among the nuclear medicine procedures, oncological PET studies showed less of a decline in utilization compared to conventional nuclear medicine and particularly nuclear cardiology. The impact was also significantly less in high-income countries. A trend towards a return to the pre-COVID-19 situation of the supply chains of radioisotopes, generators, and other essential materials was evident. Conclusion: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a significant reduction in nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic procedures throughout 2020. In June, the global decline recorded in the survey was greater than in October when there was a slight improvement. However, the total number of procedures continued below that recorded in April 2020, and less than half of the volumes normally carried out before the pandemic

2.
Radiol Case Rep ; 16(12): 3744-3745, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379210

ABSTRACT

Reactive lymphadenopathy with increased 18F-Fluordeoxyglucose uptake in positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans is known after mRNA vaccination (BNT162B2, mRNA-1273) against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2. Besides this, increased 18F-Fluordeoxyglucose uptake in the thymus might occur after mRNA vaccination as shown in our case of a young patient with mantle cell lymphoma. Especially in patients with lymphoma but also in other patients with cancer it is critical to distinguish between immune responses and involvement of the disease to avoid inadequate treatment decisions.

3.
Semin Nucl Med ; 52(1): 86-89, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331413

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an unprecedented and unexpected challenge for societies and healthcare systems, including nuclear medicine providers. This article summarizes the major events imposed on nuclear medicine by COVID-19 from a global perspective, focuses on the major lessons learned regarding attitude, medical procedures, organizational implications and strategical considerations, and then discusses what to expect (and how to prepare) for the future. While the look back to what has happened is clearly evidence based, the look ahead and the conclusions drawn require the disclaimer of only representing the personal opinion and prediction of the authors. The COVID-19 pandemic relentlessly revealed deficiencies on an organizational, systematic and leadership level in nuclear medicine and beyond. Crisis gives us the opportunity to learn and furthermore perpare for the future. The authors' take home messages include the recommendation to focus on developing a culture of responsibility and ownership as opposed to blame, strengthening teams and communication, adapting existing structures based on the lessons learned during COVID-19, as well as establishing an environment of active decision making, prioritizing proposal of solutions rather than simply stating problems, incentivizing support and collaboration, not opposition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging ; 48(13): 4318-4330, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274812

ABSTRACT

AIM: As a follow-up to the international survey conducted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in April 2020, this survey aims to provide a situational snapshot of the COVID-19 impact on nuclear medicine services worldwide, 1 year later. The survey was designed to determine the impact of the pandemic at two specific time points: June and October 2020, and compare them to the previously collected data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A web-based questionnaire, in the same format as the April 2020 survey was disseminated to nuclear medicine facilities worldwide. Survey data was collected using a secure software platform hosted by the IAEA; it was made available for 6 weeks, from November 23 to December 31, 2020. RESULTS: From 505 replies received from 96 countries, data was extracted from 355 questionnaires (of which 338 were fully completed). The responses came from centres across varying regions of the world and with heterogeneous income distributions. Regional differences and challenges across the world were identified and analysed. Globally, the volume of nuclear medicine procedures decreased by 73.3% in June 2020 and 56.9% in October 2020. Among the nuclear medicine procedures, oncological PET studies showed less of a decline in utilization compared to conventional nuclear medicine, particularly nuclear cardiology. The negative impact was also significantly less pronounced in high-income countries. A trend towards a gradual return to the pre-COVID-19 situation of the supply chains of radioisotopes, generators, and other essential materials was evident. CONCLUSION: The year 2020 has a significant decrease in nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic procedures as a result of the pandemic-related challenges. In June, the global decline recorded in the survey was greater than in October when the situation began to show improvement. However, the total number of procedures remained below those recorded in April 2020 and fell to less than half of the volumes normally carried out pre-pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nuclear Medicine , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Nuklearmedizin ; 60(3): 210-215, 2021 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169437

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic imposed an unimaginable challenge to the healthcare systems worldwide. This online survey captured the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nuclear medicine services in Germany comparing 2020 to 2019. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A web-based questionnaire was developed to record the 2020 numbers of nuclear medicine procedures and, in particular, the change compared with 2019. The changes in nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy were queried, as well as the extent to which "Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2" recommendations provided by the DGN were implemented. RESULTS: 91 complete responses were recorded and evaluated. This corresponds to about 20 % of all German nuclear medicine facilities. Nuclear medicine diagnostic tests showed a decrease in scintigraphies for thyroid (15.9 %), bone (8.8 %), lung (7.6 %), sentinel lymph nodes (5.5 %), and myocardium (1.4 %) with small increases in PET/CT examinations (1.2 %) compared with 2019. Among nuclear medicine therapies, reductions were highest for benign indications (benign thyroid 13.3 %, RSO 7.7 %), while changes from 2019 were less pronounced for malignant indications (PRRT: + 2.2 %, PSMA: + 7.4 %, SIRT: -5.9 %, and RJT for thyroid carcinoma -2.4 %). The DGN recommendations for action were fully or partially applied in 90 %. CONCLUSIONS: The initial significant reduction in nuclear medicine procedures in the first three weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic did not continue, but there was no compensation of the previously not performed services. The decrease in diagnostics and therapy procedures of benign diseases was particularly severe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Germany , Humans , Radiography/methods , Radiography/statistics & numerical data , Radionuclide Imaging/methods , Radionuclide Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Radiotherapy/methods , Radiotherapy/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(5)2021 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115417

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to analyze individual changes in cancer patients' mental health before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, and to explore predictors of mental health impairment. Over a two-week period (16-30 March 2020), 150 cancer patients in Germany participated in this study. Validated instruments assessed demographic and medical data, depression and anxiety symptoms (PHQ-2, GAD-2), distress (DT), and health status (EQ-5D-3L). All instruments were adapted to measure the individual mental health before the COVID-19 outbreak. COVID-19-related fear, trust in governmental actions to face COVID-19, and the subjective level of information regarding COVID-19 were measured. Cancer patients showed a significant increase in depression and anxiety symptoms and distress, while health status deteriorated since the COVID-19 outbreak. Increased depression and generalized anxiety symptoms were predicted by COVID-19-related fear. Trust in governmental actions to face COVID-19 and COVID-19-related fear predicted increases in distress. Higher subjective levels of information predicted less increasing anxiety symptoms and distress. Present data suggests that cancer patients experienced a significant increase in mental health burden since the COVID-19 outbreak. Observed predictors of mental health impairment and protective factors should be addressed, and appropriate interventions established, to maintain mental health of cancer patients during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Neoplasms/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics
7.
Eur J Cancer ; 144: 200-214, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987581

ABSTRACT

Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are a heterogeneous family of uncommon tumours with challenging diagnosis, clinical management and unique needs that almost always requires a multidisciplinary approach. In the absence of guidance from the scientific literature, along with the rapidly changing data available on the effect of COVID-19, we report how 12 high-volume NEN centres of expertise in 10 countries at different stages of the evolving COVID-19 global pandemic along with members of international neuroendocrine cancer patient societies have suggested to preserve high standards of care for patients with NENs. We review the multidisciplinary management of neuroendocrine neoplasms during the COVID-19 pandemic, and we suggest potential strategies to reduce risk and aid multidisciplinary treatment decision-making. By sharing our joint experiences, we aim to generate recommendations for proceeding to other institutions facing the same challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoid Tumor/therapy , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/therapy , Medical Oncology/standards , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Carcinoid Tumor/diagnosis , Consensus , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Thoracic Neoplasms/diagnosis
9.
Front Psychol ; 11: 1984, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750733

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess cancer patients' psychological burden during the COVID-19 pandemic by investigating distress (distress-thermometer), health status (EQ-5D-3L), general anxiety (GAD-7), COVID-19-related fear and associated behavioral changes and comparing these to matched healthy controls, using propensity score matching (PSM). METHODS: During the first days of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany, March 16 to 30, 2020, 150 actually treated cancer patients and 150 matched healthy controls participated in this study. Participants completed an anonymous online survey assessing health status, distress, general anxiety, COVID-19-related fear and behavioral changes (i.e., adherent safety behavior and dysfunctional safety behavior). RESULTS: Cancer patients showed no elevated level of distress, U = 10,657.5, p = 0.428, general anxiety U = 10,015.5, p = 0.099, or COVID-19-related fear compared to healthy controls, U = 10,948, p = 0.680. Both groups showed elevated COVID-19-related fear. Cancer patients reported more adherent safety behavior, such as washing hands more often or avoiding public places, U = 8,285, p < 0.001, d = 0.468. They also reported more dysfunctional safety behavior such as buying larger quantities of basic food, compared to healthy controls U = 9,599, p = 0.029, d = 0.256. Adherent safety behavior could be significantly explained by cancer diagnosis, increased COVID-19-related fear and subjective level of information about COVID-19, R 2 = 0.215, F(3) = 27.026, p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: This suggests that cancer patients are more likely to utilize adherent safety behavior. Cancer patients reported comparable levels of distress and anxiety compared to healthy controls. Still, the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with elevated COVID-19-related fear. Therefore, specific interventions are needed to prevent anxiety and improve mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

11.
J Nucl Med ; 61(9): 1278-1283, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680355

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has placed significant challenges on health-care systems worldwide, whether in the preparation, response, or recovery phase of the pandemic. This has been primarily managed by dramatically reducing in- and outpatient services for other diseases and implementing infection prevention and control measures. The impact of the pandemic on nuclear medicine departments and their services has not yet been established. The aim of this online survey was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on nuclear medicine departments. Methods: A web-based questionnaire, made available from April 16 to May 3, 2020, was designed to determine the impact of the pandemic on in- and outpatient nuclear medicine departments, including the number of procedures, employee health, availability of radiotracers and other essential supplies, and availability of personal protective equipment. The survey also inquired about operational aspects and types of facilities as well as other challenges. Results: A total of 434 responses from 72 countries were registered and analyzed. Respondents reported an average decline of 54% in diagnostic procedures. PET/CT scans decreased by an average of 36%, whereas sentinel lymph-node procedures decreased by 45%, lung scans by 56%, bone scans by 60%, myocardial studies by 66%, and thyroid studies by 67%. Of all participating centers, 81% performed radionuclide therapies, and they reported a reduction of 45% on average in the last 4 wk, ranging from over 76% in Latin America and South East Asia to 16% in South Korea and Singapore. Survey results showed that 52% of participating sites limited their 99mTc/99Mo generator purchases, and 12% of them temporarily cancelled orders. Insufficient supplies of essential materials (radioisotopes, generators, and kits) were reported, especially for 99mTc/99Mo generators and 131I, particularly in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Conclusion: Both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures declined precipitously, with countries worldwide being affected by the pandemic to a similar degree. Countries that were in the postpeak phase of the pandemic when they responded to the survey, such as South Korea and Singapore, reported a less pronounced impact on nuclear medicine services; however, the overall results of the survey showed that nuclear medicine services worldwide had been significantly impacted. In relation to staff health, 15% of respondents experienced COVID-19 infections within their own departments.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospital Departments/statistics & numerical data , Internationality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics
13.
Nuklearmedizin ; 59(4): 294-299, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197118

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Preparations of health systems to accommodate large number of severely ill COVID-19 patients in March/April 2020 has a significant impact on nuclear medicine departments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A web-based questionnaire was designed to differentiate the impact of the pandemic on inpatient and outpatient nuclear medicine operations and on public versus private health systems, respectively. Questions were addressing the following issues: impact on nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy, use of recommendations, personal protective equipment, and organizational adaptations. The survey was available for 6 days and closed on April 20, 2020. RESULTS: 113 complete responses were recorded. Nearly all participants (97 %) report a decline of nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures. The mean reduction in the last three weeks for PET/CT, scintigraphies of bone, myocardium, lung thyroid, sentinel lymph-node are -14.4 %, -47.2 %, -47.5 %, -40.7 %, -58.4 %, and -25.2 % respectively. Furthermore, 76 % of the participants report a reduction in therapies especially for benign thyroid disease (-41.8 %) and radiosynoviorthesis (-53.8 %) while tumor therapies remained mainly stable. 48 % of the participants report a shortage of personal protective equipment. CONCLUSIONS: Nuclear medicine services are notably reduced 3 weeks after the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic reached Germany, Austria and Switzerland on a large scale. We must be aware that the current crisis will also have a significant economic impact on the healthcare system. As the survey cannot adapt to daily dynamic changes in priorities, it serves as a first snapshot requiring follow-up studies and comparisons with other countries and regions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Nuclear Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Austria , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/radiotherapy , Germany , Humans , Nuclear Medicine/instrumentation , Nuclear Medicine/organization & administration , Outpatients , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/radiotherapy , Switzerland
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL