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1.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 2022 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865207

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Bacterial lung microbiota are correlated with lung inflammation and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and altered in severe COVID-19. However, the association between lung microbiota (including fungi) and resolution of ARDS in COVID-19 remains unclear. We hypothesized that increased lung bacterial and fungal burdens are related to non-resolving ARDS and mortality in COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: To determine the relation between lung microbiota and clinical outcomes of COVID-19-related ARDS. METHODS: This observational cohort study enrolled mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients. All patients had ARDS and underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Lung microbiota were profiled using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and qPCR targeting the 16S and 18S rRNA genes. Key features of lung microbiota (bacterial and fungal burden, α-diversity and community composition) served as predictors. Our primary outcome was successful extubation adjudicated 60 days after intubation, analyzed using a competing risk regression model with mortality as competing risk. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: BAL samples of 114 unique COVID-19 patients were analyzed. Patients with increased lung bacterial and fungal burden were less likely to be extubated (subdistribution hazard ratio 0.64 [95% CI 0.42-0.97], p=0.034 and 0.59 [95% CI 0.42-0.83], p=0.0027 per log10 increase in bacterial and fungal burden, respectively) and had higher mortality (bacterial burden p=0.012, fungal burden p=0.0498). Lung microbiota composition was associated with successful extubation (p=0.0045). Proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumor necrosis factor-α) were associated with the microbial burdens. CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial and fungal lung microbiota are related to non-resolving ARDS in COVID-19, and represent an important contributor to heterogeneity in COVID-19-related ARDS. This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

2.
Trials ; 23(1): 158, 2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a disruptive increase in the number of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a severe, life-threatening medical condition characterized by widespread inflammation and vascular leak in the lungs. Although there is no proven therapy to reduce pulmonary vascular leak in ARDS, recent studies demonstrated that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib reinforces the endothelial barrier and prevents vascular leak in inflammatory conditions, while leaving the immune response intact. METHODS: This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial of intravenous (IV) imatinib mesylate in 90 mechanically ventilated subjects with COVID-19-induced ARDS. Subjects are 18 years or older, admitted to the ICU for mechanical ventilation, meeting the Berlin criteria for moderate-severe ARDS with a positive polymerase chain reaction test for SARS-CoV2. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either imatinib (as mesylate) 200 mg bis in die (b.i.d.) or placebo IV infusion for 7 days, or until ICU discharge or death. The primary study outcome is the change in Extravascular Lung Water Index (EVLWi) between day 1 and day 4. Secondary outcome parameters include changes in oxygenation and ventilation parameters, duration of invasive mechanical ventilation, number of ventilator-free days during the 28-day study period, length of ICU stay, and mortality during 28 days after randomization. Additional secondary parameters include safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics. DISCUSSION: The current study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of IV imatinib in mechanically ventilated subjects with COVID-19-related ARDS. We hypothesize that imatinib decreases pulmonary edema, as measured by extravascular lung water using a PiCCO catheter. The reduction in pulmonary edema may reverse hypoxemic respiratory failure and hasten recovery. As pulmonary edema is an important contributor to ARDS, we further hypothesize that imatinib reduces disease severity, reflected by a reduction in 28-day mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and ICU length of stay. TRIAL STATUS: Protocol version and date: V3.1, 16 April 2021. Recruitment started on 09 March 2021. Estimated recruitment period of approximately 40 weeks. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04794088 . Registered on 11 March 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/adverse effects , Multicenter Studies as Topic , RNA, Viral , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312255

ABSTRACT

Background: Lung ultrasound can adequately monitor disease severity in pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We hypothesize lung ultrasound can adequately monitor COVID-19 pneumonia in critically ill patients. Methods: Adult patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to the intensive care unit of two academic hospitals who underwent a 12-zone lung ultrasound and a chest CT examination were included. Baseline characteristics, and outcomes including composite endpoint death or ICU stay >30 days were recorded. Lung ultrasound and CT images were quantified as a Lung Ultrasound Score Involvement index (LUSI) and CT Severity Involvement index (CTSI). Primary outcome was the correlation, agreement, and concordance between LUSI and CTSI. Secondary outcome was the association of LUSI and CTSI with the composite endpoints. Results: We included 55 ultrasound examinations in 34 patients, which were 88% were male, with a mean age of 63 years and mean P/F ratio of 151. The correlation between LUSI and CTSI was strong (r=0.795), with an overall 15% bias, and limits of agreement ranging -40 to 9.7. Concordance between changes in sequentially measured LUSI and CTSI was 81%. In the univariate model, high involvement on LUSI and CTSI were associated with a composite endpoint. In the multivariate model, LUSI was the only remaining independent predictor. Conclusions: Lung ultrasound can be used as an alternative for chest CT in monitoring COVID-19 pneumonia in critically ill patients as it can quantify pulmonary involvement, register changes over the course of the disease, and predict death or ICU stay >30 days.Trial registration: NTR, NL8584. registered 01 May 2020 - retrospectively registered, https://www.trialregister.nl/trial/8584

4.
Clin Transl Sci ; 15(4): 854-858, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625873

ABSTRACT

Recently, we reported the phase II portion of the adaptive phase II/III PANAMO trial exploring potential benefit and safety of selectively blocking C5a with the monoclonal antibody vilobelimab (IFX-1) in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The potent anaphylatoxin C5a attracts neutrophils and monocytes to the infection site, causes tissue damage by oxidative radical formation and enzyme releases, and leads to activation of the coagulation system. Results demonstrated that C5a inhibition with vilobelimab was safe and secondary outcomes appeared in favor of vilobelimab. We now report the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of the phase II study. Between March 31 and April 24, 2020, 30 patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive vilobelimab plus best supportive care or best supportive care only. Samples for measurement of vilobelimab, C3a and C5a blood concentrations were taken. Vilobelimab predose (trough) drug concentrations in plasma ranged from 84,846 to 248,592 ng/ml (571 to 1674 nM) with a geometric mean of 151,702 ng/ml (1022 nM) on day 2 and from 80,060 to 200,746 ng/ml (539 to 1352 nM) with a geometric mean of 139,503 ng/ml (939 nM) on day 8. After the first vilobelimab infusion, C5a concentrations were suppressed in the vilobelimab group (median 39.70 ng/ml 4.8 nM, IQR 33.20-45.55) as compared to the control group (median 158.53 ng/ml 19.1 nM, IQR 60.03-200.89, p = 0.0006). The suppression was maintained on day 8 (p = 0.001). The current PK/PD analysis shows that vilobelimab efficiently inhibits C5a in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Complement C3a , Complement C5a , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
5.
Alzheimer's & Dementia ; 17(S5):e057841, 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1589190

ABSTRACT

Background COVID-19 is a respiratory disease where neurological sequelae are frequently reported. Neurofilament light (NfL) in plasma is a validated biomarker for neuronal damage. We assessed the trajectory of NfL levels in intensive care unit (ICU) patients diagnosed with COVID-19, and studied its relationship to clinical outcomes and markers of hypothesized pathophysiological mechanisms. Method As part of the Art-Deco study and Amsterdam UMC COVID-biobank, longitudinal samples and clinical data were collected weekly from a cohort of 31 prospectively admitted ICU patients with a minimum of 7 days of ventilation. The mean±sd age was 63±11 years. Admission duration ranged from 14-35 days and 156 samples were collected. We evaluated the NfL trajectory over time, and whether this trajectory differed by 90-day mortality outcome. Due to the non-linear trajectory of NfL, we applied linear mixed models including cubic splines for the time variable. Secondly, we tested whether baseline or peak NfL levels predicted mortality (n=7/31), delirium incidence after detubation (n=18/22), and duration of delirium (6±6 days). Third, we assessed if disease severity (day 7 Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA] score) and baseline hypoxemia (pAO2 before intubation), inflammation (IL1-b, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α), and coagulopathy (d-dimer, presence of pulmonary embolism) were predictive of the NfL trajectory. For the latter models, we included an interaction term for the pathophysiological markers in the linear mixed models. All models were adjusted for age. Result NfL increased during ICU admission (p<001), and persisted longer in the non-survivors (p<0.05;Figure 1). Baseline or maximum NfL was not predictive of mortality or delirium incidence. However, maximum NfL correlated to the duration of delirium (r=0.5;p=0.02). From the pathophysiological markers, SOFA scores (p<0.05) and baseline TNF-α (p<0.05) were related to a stronger increase of NfL over time. Conclusion NfL levels increased over time and plateaued after 2-3 weeks in most COVID-19 patients at the ICU. Peak levels of NfL were predictive of delirium persistence. Repeated NfL levels may provide a future method for monitoring neurological outcomes in sedated ICU patients. Disease severity and specific inflammatory components appear important predictors of the NfL trajectory reflecting axonal damage in severe COVID-19 patients.

6.
Int J Cardiol ; 349: 157-165, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Compelling evidence has shown cardiac involvement in COVID-19 patients. However, the overall majority of these studies use data obtained during the first wave of the pandemic, while recently differences have been reported in disease course and mortality between first- and second wave COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare cardiac pathology between first- and second wave COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Autopsied hearts from first- (n = 15) and second wave (n = 10) COVID-19 patients and from 18 non-COVID-19 control patients were (immuno)histochemically analyzed. CD45+ leukocyte, CD68+ macrophage and CD3+ T lymphocyte infiltration, cardiomyocyte necrosis and microvascular thrombosis were quantified. In addition, the procoagulant factors Tissue Factor (TF), Factor VII (FVII), Factor XII (FXII), the anticoagulant protein Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 (DPP4) and the advanced glycation end-product N(ε)-Carboxymethyllysine (CML), as markers of microvascular thrombogenicity and dysfunction, were quantified. RESULTS: Cardiac inflammation was significantly decreased in second wave compared to first wave COVID-19 patients, predominantly related to a decrease in infiltrated lymphocytes and the occurrence of lymphocytic myocarditis. This was accompanied by significant decreases in cardiomyocyte injury and microvascular thrombosis. Moreover, microvascular deposits of FVII and CML were significantly lower in second wave compared to first wave COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that in our cohort of fatal COVID-19 cases cardiac inflammation, cardiomyocyte injury and microvascular thrombogenicity were markedly decreased in second wave compared to first wave patients. This may reflect advances in COVID-19 treatment related to an increased use of steroids in the second COVID-19 wave.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Inflammation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
ERJ Open Res ; 7(4)2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518253

ABSTRACT

During the virtual European Respiratory Society Congress 2020, early career members summarised the sessions organised by the Respiratory Intensive Care Assembly. The topics covered included diagnostic strategies in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure, with a focus on patients with interstitial lung disease and for obvious reasons, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. These sessions are summarised in this article, with take-home messages highlighted.

8.
Crit Care Med ; 50(5): 750-759, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440663

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of extended lung ultrasonographic assessment, including evaluation of dynamic air bronchograms and color Doppler imaging to differentiate pneumonia and atelectasis in patients with consolidation on chest radiograph. Compare this approach to the Simplified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score, Lung Ultrasound Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score, and the Bedside Lung Ultrasound in Emergency protocol. DESIGN: Prospective diagnostic accuracy study. SETTING: Adult ICU applying selective digestive decontamination. PATIENTS: Adult patients that underwent a chest radiograph for any indication at any time during admission. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, coronavirus disease 2019, severe thoracic trauma, and infectious isolation measures were excluded. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Lung ultrasound was performed within 24 hours of chest radiograph. Consolidated tissue was assessed for presence of dynamic air bronchograms and with color Doppler imaging for presence of flow. Clinical data were recorded after ultrasonographic assessment. The primary outcome was diagnostic accuracy of dynamic air bronchogram and color Doppler imaging alone and within a decision tree to differentiate pneumonia from atelectasis. Of 120 patients included, 51 (42.5%) were diagnosed with pneumonia. The dynamic air bronchogram had a 45% (95% CI, 31-60%) sensitivity and 99% (95% CI, 92-100%) specificity. Color Doppler imaging had a 90% (95% CI, 79-97%) sensitivity and 68% (95% CI, 56-79%) specificity. The combined decision tree had an 86% (95% CI, 74-94%) sensitivity and an 86% (95% CI, 75-93%) specificity. The Bedside Lung Ultrasound in Emergency protocol had a 100% (95% CI, 93-100%) sensitivity and 0% (95% CI, 0-5%) specificity, while the Simplified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score and Lung Ultrasound Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score had a 41% (95% CI, 28-56%) sensitivity, 84% (95% CI, 73-92%) specificity and 68% (95% CI, 54-81%) sensitivity, 81% (95% CI, 70-90%) specificity, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients with pulmonary consolidation on chest radiograph, an extended lung ultrasound protocol is an accurate and directly bedside available tool to differentiate pneumonia from atelectasis. It outperforms standard lung ultrasound and clinical scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Pulmonary Atelectasis , Adult , Critical Illness , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Atelectasis/diagnostic imaging , Sensitivity and Specificity , Ultrasonography/methods
9.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430195

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The diaphragm is the main muscle of inspiration, and its dysfunction contributes to adverse clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. We recently reported the infiltration of SARS-CoV-2, and the development of fibrosis, in the diaphragm of critically ill patients with COVID-19. In the current study, we aimed to characterise myofiber structure in the diaphragm of critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Diaphragm muscle specimens were collected during autopsy from patients who died of COVID-19 in three academic medical centres in the Netherlands in April and May 2020 (n=27). We studied diaphragm myofiber gene expression and structure and compared the findings obtained to those of deceased critically ill patients without COVID-19 (n=10). RESULTS: Myofibers of critically ill patients with COVID-19 showed on average larger cross-sectional area (slow-twitch myofibers: 2441±229 vs 1571±309 µm2; fast-twitch myofibers: 1966±209 vs 1225±222 µm2). Four critically ill patients with COVID-19 showed extremely large myofibers, which were splitting and contained many centralised nuclei. RNA-sequencing data revealed differentially expressed genes involved in muscle regeneration. CONCLUSION: Diaphragm of critically ill patients with COVID-19 has distinct myopathic features compared with critically ill patients without COVID-19, which may contribute to the ongoing dyspnoea and fatigue in the patients surviving COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Diaphragm/pathology , Aged , Autopsy , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Muscle Fibers, Skeletal/pathology , Netherlands
11.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(9): 957-968, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275790

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The major complication of COVID-19 is hypoxaemic respiratory failure from capillary leak and alveolar oedema. Experimental and early clinical data suggest that the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor imatinib reverses pulmonary capillary leak. METHODS: This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was done at 13 academic and non-academic teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Hospitalised patients (aged ≥18 years) with COVID-19, as confirmed by an RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2, requiring supplemental oxygen to maintain a peripheral oxygen saturation of greater than 94% were eligible. Patients were excluded if they had severe pre-existing pulmonary disease, had pre-existing heart failure, had undergone active treatment of a haematological or non-haematological malignancy in the previous 12 months, had cytopenia, or were receiving concomitant treatment with medication known to strongly interact with imatinib. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either oral imatinib, given as a loading dose of 800 mg on day 0 followed by 400 mg daily on days 1-9, or placebo. Randomisation was done with a computer-based clinical data management platform with variable block sizes (containing two, four, or six patients), stratified by study site. The primary outcome was time to discontinuation of mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 consecutive hours, while being alive during a 28-day period. Secondary outcomes included safety, mortality at 28 days, and the need for invasive mechanical ventilation. All efficacy and safety analyses were done in all randomised patients who had received at least one dose of study medication (modified intention-to-treat population). This study is registered with the EU Clinical Trials Register (EudraCT 2020-001236-10). FINDINGS: Between March 31, 2020, and Jan 4, 2021, 805 patients were screened, of whom 400 were eligible and randomly assigned to the imatinib group (n=204) or the placebo group (n=196). A total of 385 (96%) patients (median age 64 years [IQR 56-73]) received at least one dose of study medication and were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. Time to discontinuation of ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 h was not significantly different between the two groups (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0·95 [95% CI 0·76-1·20]). At day 28, 15 (8%) of 197 patients had died in the imatinib group compared with 27 (14%) of 188 patients in the placebo group (unadjusted HR 0·51 [0·27-0·95]). After adjusting for baseline imbalances between the two groups (sex, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) the HR for mortality was 0·52 (95% CI 0·26-1·05). The HR for mechanical ventilation in the imatinib group compared with the placebo group was 1·07 (0·63-1·80; p=0·81). The median duration of invasive mechanical ventilation was 7 days (IQR 3-13) in the imatinib group compared with 12 days (6-20) in the placebo group (p=0·0080). 91 (46%) of 197 patients in the imatinib group and 82 (44%) of 188 patients in the placebo group had at least one grade 3 or higher adverse event. The safety evaluation revealed no imatinib-associated adverse events. INTERPRETATION: The study failed to meet its primary outcome, as imatinib did not reduce the time to discontinuation of ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 consecutive hours in patients with COVID-19 requiring supplemental oxygen. The observed effects on survival (although attenuated after adjustment for baseline imbalances) and duration of mechanical ventilation suggest that imatinib might confer clinical benefit in hospitalised patients with COVID-19, but further studies are required to validate these findings. FUNDING: Amsterdam Medical Center Foundation, Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek/ZonMW, and the European Union Innovative Medicines Initiative 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Imatinib Mesylate/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Capillary Permeability/drug effects , Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Placebos/administration & dosage , Placebos/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 664209, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247863

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Systemic activation of procoagulant and inflammatory mechanisms has been implicated in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. Knowledge of activation of these host response pathways in the lung compartment of COVID-19 patients is limited. Objectives: To evaluate local and systemic activation of coagulation and interconnected inflammatory responses in critically ill COVID-19 patients with persistent acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods: Paired bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma samples were obtained from 17 patients with COVID-19 related persistent acute respiratory distress syndrome (mechanical ventilation > 7 days) 1 and 2 weeks after start mechanical ventilation and compared with 8 healthy controls. Thirty-four host response biomarkers stratified into five functional domains (coagulation, complement system, cytokines, chemokines and growth factors) were measured. Measurements and Main Results: In all patients, all functional domains were activated, especially in the bronchoalveolar compartment, with significantly increased levels of D-dimers, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, soluble tissue factor, C1-inhibitor antigen and activity levels, tissue type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type I, soluble CD40 ligand and soluble P-selectin (coagulation), next to activation of C3bc and C4bc (complement) and multiple interrelated cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. In 10 patients in whom follow-up samples were obtained between 3 and 4 weeks after start mechanical ventilation many bronchoalveolar and plasma host response biomarkers had declined. Conclusions: Critically ill, ventilated patients with COVID-19 show strong responses relating to coagulation, the complement system, cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in the bronchoalveolar compartment. These results suggest a local pulmonary rather than a systemic procoagulant and inflammatory "storm" in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Critical Illness , Lung/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Aged , Blood Coagulation , Cohort Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial
13.
Thorax ; 76(10): 1010-1019, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180971

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the pathophysiology of COVID-19 is almost exclusively derived from studies that examined the immune response in blood. We here aimed to analyse the pulmonary immune response during severe COVID-19 and to compare this with blood responses. METHODS: This was an observational study in patients with COVID-19 admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Mononuclear cells were purified from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood, and analysed by spectral flow cytometry; inflammatory mediators were measured in BALF and plasma. FINDINGS: Paired blood and BALF samples were obtained from 17 patients, four of whom died in the ICU. Macrophages and T cells were the most abundant cells in BALF, with a high percentage of T cells expressing the ƴδ T cell receptor. In the lungs, both CD4 and CD8 T cells were predominantly effector memory cells (87·3% and 83·8%, respectively), and these cells expressed higher levels of the exhaustion marker programmad death-1 than in peripheral blood. Prolonged ICU stay (>14 days) was associated with a reduced proportion of activated T cells in peripheral blood and even more so in BALF. T cell activation in blood, but not in BALF, was higher in fatal COVID-19 cases. Increased levels of inflammatory mediators were more pronounced in BALF than in plasma. INTERPRETATION: The bronchoalveolar immune response in COVID-19 has a unique local profile that strongly differs from the immune profile in peripheral blood. Fully elucidating COVID-19 pathophysiology will require investigation of the pulmonary immune response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular/physiology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Aged , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Macrophages/physiology , Male , Middle Aged , T-Lymphocytes/physiology
14.
ERJ Open Res ; 6(2)2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177705

ABSTRACT

With a modified circuit, it is feasible to ventilate two patients with one ventilator over a relevant range of compliances. Adding inspiratory resistance allows individual titration of tidal volume, and incorporating one-way valves prevents pendelluft. https://bit.ly/3ex8SYP.

15.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(6): 1535-1538, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1151896

ABSTRACT

Despite high levels of CXCR3 ligands in mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients, BALF CD8 T cells were not enriched in CXCR3+ cells but rather CCR6+ , likely due to high CCL20 levels in BALF, and had very high PD-1 expression. In mechanically ventilated, but not ward, patients Th-1 immunity is impaired. ​.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokine CCL20/immunology , Lung/immunology , Receptors, CCR6/immunology , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged
16.
Lancet Microbe ; 1(7): e290-e299, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087376

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) targets multiple organs and causes severe coagulopathy. Histopathological organ changes might not only be attributable to a direct virus-induced effect, but also the immune response. The aims of this study were to assess the duration of viral presence, identify the extent of inflammatory response, and investigate the underlying cause of coagulopathy. METHODS: This prospective autopsy cohort study was done at Amsterdam University Medical Centers (UMC), the Netherlands. With informed consent from relatives, full body autopsy was done on 21 patients with COVID-19 for whom autopsy was requested between March 9 and May 18, 2020. In addition to histopathological evaluation of organ damage, the presence of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein and the composition of the immune infiltrate and thrombi were assessed, and all were linked to disease course. FINDINGS: Our cohort (n=21) included 16 (76%) men, and median age was 68 years (range 41-78). Median disease course (time from onset of symptoms to death) was 22 days (range 5-44 days). In 11 patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 tropism, SARS-CoV-2 infected cells were present in multiple organs, most abundantly in the lungs, but presence in the lungs became sporadic with increased disease course. Other SARS-CoV-2-positive organs included the upper respiratory tract, heart, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. In histological analyses of organs (sampled from nine to 21 patients per organ), an extensive inflammatory response was present in the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, and brain. In the brain, extensive inflammation was seen in the olfactory bulbs and medulla oblongata. Thrombi and neutrophilic plugs were present in the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, and brain and were most frequently observed late in the disease course (15 patients with thrombi, median disease course 22 days [5-44]; ten patients with neutrophilic plugs, 21 days [5-44]). Neutrophilic plugs were observed in two forms: solely composed of neutrophils with neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), or as aggregates of NETs and platelets.. INTERPRETATION: In patients with lethal COVID-19, an extensive systemic inflammatory response was present, with a continued presence of neutrophils and NETs. However, SARS-CoV-2-infected cells were only sporadically present at late stages of COVID-19. This suggests a maladaptive immune response and substantiates the evidence for immunomodulation as a target in the treatment of severe COVID-19. FUNDING: Amsterdam UMC Corona Research Fund.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Adult , Aged , Autopsy , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Intensive Care Med Exp ; 9(1): 1, 2021 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045593

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung ultrasound can adequately monitor disease severity in pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We hypothesize lung ultrasound can adequately monitor COVID-19 pneumonia in critically ill patients. METHODS: Adult patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to the intensive care unit of two academic hospitals who underwent a 12-zone lung ultrasound and a chest CT examination were included. Baseline characteristics, and outcomes including composite endpoint death or ICU stay > 30 days were recorded. Lung ultrasound and CT images were quantified as a lung ultrasound score involvement index (LUSI) and CT severity involvement index (CTSI). Primary outcome was the correlation, agreement, and concordance between LUSI and CTSI. Secondary outcome was the association of LUSI and CTSI with the composite endpoints. RESULTS: We included 55 ultrasound examinations in 34 patients, which were 88% were male, with a mean age of 63 years and mean P/F ratio of 151. The correlation between LUSI and CTSI was strong (r = 0.795), with an overall 15% bias, and limits of agreement ranging - 40 to 9.7. Concordance between changes in sequentially measured LUSI and CTSI was 81%. In the univariate model, high involvement on LUSI and CTSI were associated with a composite endpoint. In the multivariate model, LUSI was the only remaining independent predictor. CONCLUSIONS: Lung ultrasound can be used as an alternative for chest CT in monitoring COVID-19 pneumonia in critically ill patients as it can quantify pulmonary involvement, register changes over the course of the disease, and predict death or ICU stay > 30 days. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NTR, NL8584. Registered 01 May 2020-retrospectively registered, https://www.trialregister.nl/trial/8584.

18.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 2(12): e764-e773, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003183

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe COVID-19 is characterised by inflammation and coagulation in the presence of complement system activation. We aimed to explore the potential benefit and safety of selectively blocking the anaphylatoxin and complement protein C5a with the monoclonal antibody IFX-1 (vilobelimab), in patients with severe COVID-19. METHODS: We did an exploratory, open-label, randomised phase 2 trial (part of the adaptive phase 2/3 PANAMO trial) of intravenous IFX-1 in adults with severe COVID-19 at three academic hospitals in the Netherlands. Eligibility criteria were age 18 years or older; severe pneumonia with pulmonary infiltrates consistent with pneumonia, a clinical history of severe shortness of breath within the past 14 days, or a need for non-invasive or invasive ventilation; severe disease defined as a ratio of partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional concentration of oxygen in inspired air (PaO2/FiO2) between 100 mm Hg and 250 mm Hg in the supine position; and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection confirmed by RT-PCR. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive IFX-1 (up to seven doses of 800 mg intravenously) plus best supportive care (IFX-1 group) or best supportive care only (control group). The primary outcome was the percentage change in PaO2/FiO2 in the supine position between baseline and day 5. Mortality at 28 days and treatment-emergent and serious adverse events were key secondary outcomes. The primary analysis was done in the intention-to-treat population and safety analyses were done in all patients according to treatment received. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04333420). FINDINGS: Between March 31 and April 24, 2020, 30 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to the IFX-1 group (n=15) or the control group (n=15). During the study it became clear that several patients could not be assessed regularly in the supine position because of severe hypoxaemia. It was therefore decided to focus on all PaO2/FiO2 assessments (irrespective of position). At day 5 after randomisation, the mean PaO2/FiO2 (irrespective of position) was 158 mm Hg (SD 63; range 84-265) in the IFX-1 group and 189 mm Hg (89; 71-329) in the control group. Analyses of the least squares mean relative change in PaO2/FiO2 at day 5 showed no differences between treatment groups (17% change in the IFX-1 group vs 41% in the control group; difference -24% [95% CI -58 to 9], p=0·15. Kaplan-Meier estimates of mortality by 28 days were 13% (95% CI 0-31) for the IFX-1 group and 27% (4-49) for the control group (adjusted hazard ratio for death 0·65 [95% CI 0·10-4·14]). The frequency of serious adverse events were similar between groups (nine [60%] in the IFX-1 group vs seven [47%] in the control group) and no deaths were considered related to treatment assignment. However, a smaller proportion of patients had pulmonary embolisms classed as serious in the IFX-1 group (two [13%]) than in the control group (six [40%]). Infections classed as serious were reported in three (20%) patients in the IFX-1 group versus five (33%) patients in the control group. INTERPRETATION: In this small exploratory phase 2 part of the PANAMO trial, C5a inhibition with IFX-1 appears to be safe in patients with severe COVID-19. The secondary outcome results in favour of IFX-1 are preliminary because the study was not powered on these endpoints, but they support the investigation of C5a inhibition with IFX-1 in a phase 3 trial using 28-day mortality as the primary endpoint. FUNDING: InflaRx.

20.
ERJ Open Res ; 6(4)2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-952035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over 2 million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS CoV-2). Lung ultrasound has been proposed to diagnose and monitor it, despite the fact that little is known about the ultrasound appearance due to the novelty of the illness. The aim of this manuscript is to characterise the lung ultrasonographic appearance of critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, with particular emphasis on its relationship with the time course of the illness and clinical parameters. METHODS: Adult patients from the intensive care unit of two academic hospitals who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were included. Images were analysed using internationally recognised techniques which included assessment of the pleura, number of B-lines, pathology in the PLAPS (posterolateral alveolar and/or pleural syndrome) point, bedside lung ultrasound in emergency profiles, and the lung ultrasound score. The primary outcomes were frequencies, percentages and differences in lung ultrasound findings overall and between short (≤14 days) and long (>14 days) durations of symptoms and their correlation with clinical parameters. RESULTS: In this pilot observational study, 61 patients were included with 76 examinations available for analysis. 26% of patients had no anterior lung abnormalities, while the most prevalent pathological ultrasound findings were thickening of the pleura (42%), ≥3 B-lines per view (38%) and presence of PLAPS (74%). Patients with "long" duration of symptoms presented more frequently with a thickened and irregular pleura (32 (21%) versus 11 (9%)), C-profile (18 (47%) versus 8 (25%)) and pleural effusion (14 (19%) versus 3 (5%)), compared to patients with short duration of symptoms. Lung ultrasound findings did not correlate with arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction ratio, fluid balance or dynamic compliance. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 results in significant, but not specific, ultrasound changes, with decreased lung sliding, thickening of the pleura and a B-profile being the most commonly observed. With time, a thickened and irregular pleura, C-profile and pleural effusion become more common findings. When screening patients, a comprehensive ultrasound protocol might be necessary.

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