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1.
Vaccine ; 40(2): 298-305, 2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lyme disease incidence is increasing, despite current prevention options. New Lyme disease vaccine candidates are in development, however, investigation of the acceptability of a Lyme disease vaccine among potential consumers is needed prior to any vaccine coming to market. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study to estimate willingness to receive a potential Lyme disease vaccine and factors associated with willingness. METHODS: The web-based survey was administered to a random sample of Connecticut, Maryland, Minnesota, and New York residents June-July 2018. Survey-weighted descriptive statistics were conducted to estimate the proportion willing to receive a potential Lyme disease vaccine. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression models were used to quantify the association of sociodemographic characteristics and Lyme disease vaccine attitudes with willingness to be vaccinated. RESULTS: Surveys were completed by 3313 respondents (6% response rate). We estimated that 64% of residents were willing to receive a Lyme disease vaccine, while 30% were uncertain and 7% were unwilling. Compared to those who were willing, those who were uncertain were more likely to be parents, adults 45-65 years old, non-White, have less than a bachelor's degree, or have safety concerns about a potential Lyme disease vaccine. Those who were unwilling were also more likely to be non-White, have less than a bachelor's degree, or have safety concerns about a potential Lyme disease vaccine. In addition, the unwilling had low confidence in vaccines in general, had low perceived risk of contracting Lyme disease, and said they would not be influenced by a positive recommendation from a healthcare provider. DISCUSSION: Overall, willingness to receive a Lyme disease vaccine was high. Effective communication by clinicians regarding safety and other vaccine parameters to those groups who are uncertain will be critical for increasing vaccine uptake and reducing Lyme disease incidence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lyme Disease Vaccines , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Connecticut/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Incidence , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
2.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(1): ofab599, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may vary over time; trends in clinical severity at admission during the pandemic among hospitalized patients in the United States have been incompletely described, so a historical record of severity over time is lacking. METHODS: We classified 466677 hospital admissions for COVID-19 from April 2020 to April 2021 into 4 mutually exclusive severity grades based on indicators present on admission (from most to least severe): Grade 4 included intensive care unit (ICU) admission and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV); grade 3 included non-IMV ICU and/or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation; grade 2 included diagnosis of acute respiratory failure; and grade 1 included none of the above indicators. Trends were stratified by sex, age, race/ethnicity, and comorbid conditions. We also examined severity in states with high vs low Alpha (B.1.1.7) variant burden. RESULTS: Severity tended to be lower among women, younger adults, and those with fewer comorbidities compared to their counterparts. The proportion of admissions classified as grade 1 or 2 fluctuated over time, but these less-severe grades comprised a majority (75%-85%) of admissions every month. Grades 3 and 4 consistently made up a minority of admissions (15%-25%), and grade 4 showed consistent decreases in all subgroups, including states with high Alpha variant burden. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical severity among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 has varied over time but has not consistently or markedly worsened over time. The proportion of admissions classified as grade 4 decreased in all subgroups. There was no consistent evidence of worsening severity in states with higher vs lower Alpha prevalence.

3.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(10): 2715-2717, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486734

ABSTRACT

Surveys indicate US residents spent more time outdoors in 2020 than in 2019, but fewer tick bite-related emergency department visits and Lyme disease laboratory tests were reported. Despite ongoing exposure, Lyme disease case reporting for 2020 might be artificially reduced due to coronavirus disease-associated changes in healthcare-seeking behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lyme Disease , Tick Bites , Humans , Lyme Disease/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
4.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(6): ofab230, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303927

ABSTRACT

During a recent outbreak of Bartonella quintana disease in Denver, 15% of 241 persons experiencing homelessness who presented for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 testing were seroreactive for Bartonella. Improved recognition of B quintana disease and prevention of louse infestation are critical for this vulnerable population.

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