Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Am J Transplant ; 22(11): 2616-2626, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895940

ABSTRACT

Potential regional variations in effects of COVID-19 on federally mandated, program-specific evaluations by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) have been controversial. SRTR January 2022 program evaluations ended transplant follow-up on March 12, 2020, and excluded transplants performed from March 13, 2020 to June 12, 2020 (the "carve-out"). This study examined the carve-out's impact, and the effect of additionally censoring COVID-19 deaths, on first-year posttransplant outcomes for transplants from July 2018 through December 2020. Program-specific hazard ratios (HRs) for graft failure and death estimated under two alternative scenarios were compared with published HRs: (1) the carve-out was removed; (2) the carve-out was retained, but deaths due to COVID-19 were additionally censored. The HRs estimated by censoring COVID-19 deaths were highly correlated with those estimated with the carve-out alone (r2  = .96). Removal of the carve-out resulted in greater variation in HRs while remaining highly correlated (r2  = .82); however, little geographic impact of the carve-out was observed. The carve-out increased average HR in the Northwest by 0.049; carve-out plus censoring reduced average HR in the Midwest by 0.009. Other regions of the country were not significantly affected. Thus, the current COVID-19 carve-out does not appear to impart substantial bias based on the region of the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Program Evaluation , Pandemics , Transplant Recipients , Registries
2.
Clin Transplant ; 36(5): e14596, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: More patients are waitlisted for solid organs than transplants are performed each year. The COVID-19 pandemic immediately increased waitlist mortality and decreased transplants and listings. METHODS: To calculate the number of candidate listings after the pandemic began and short-term changes that may affect waiting time, we conducted a Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients surveillance study from January 1, 2012 to February 28, 2021. RESULTS: The number of candidates on the liver waitlist continued a steady decline that began before the pandemic. Numbers of candidates on the kidney, heart, and lung waitlists decreased dramatically. More than 3000 fewer candidates were awaiting a kidney transplant on March 7, 2021, than on March 8, 2020. Listings and removals decreased for each solid organ beginning in March 2020. The number of heart and lung listings returned to equal or above that of removals. Listings for kidney transplant, which is often less urgent than heart and lung transplant, remain below numbers of removals. Removals due to transplant decreased for all organs, while removals due to death increased for only kidneys. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of the predicted surge in listings for solid organ transplant with a plateau or control of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Organ Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Waiting Lists
3.
Am J Transplant ; 21(6): 2262-2268, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096670

ABSTRACT

We examined the effects of COVID-19 on solid organ waiting list mortality in the United States and compared effects across patient demographics (e.g., race, age, and sex) and donation service areas. Three separate piecewise exponential survival models estimated for each solid organ the overall, demographic-specific, and donation service area-specific differences in the hazard of waitlist mortality before and after the national emergency declaration on March 13, 2020. Kidney waiting list mortality was higher after than before the national emergency (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.37; 95% CI, 1.23-1.52). The hazard of waitlist mortality was not significantly different before and after COVID-19 for liver (aHR, 0.94), pancreas (aHR, 1.01), lung (aHR, 1.00), and heart (aHR, 0.94). Kidney candidates had notable variability in differences across donation service areas (aHRs, New York City, 2.52; New Jersey, 1.84; and Michigan, 1.56). The only demographic group with increased waiting list mortality were Blacks versus Whites (aHR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07-1.86) for kidney candidates. The first 10 weeks after the declaration of a national emergency had a heterogeneous effect on waitlist mortality rate, varying by geography and ethnicity. This heterogeneity will complicate comparisons of transplant program performance during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Humans , Michigan , New York City , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Waiting Lists
4.
Transplantation ; 104(11): 2215-2220, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-636385

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) disease has transformed innumerable aspects of medical practice, particularly in the field of transplantation. MAIN BODY: Here we describe a single-center approach to creating a generalizable, comprehensive, and graduated set of recommendations to respond in stepwise fashion to the challenges posed by these conditions, and the underlying principles guiding such decisions. CONCLUSIONS: Creation of a stepwise plan will allow transplant centers to respond in a dynamic fashion to the ongoing challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Organ Transplantation/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Health Resources , Humans , Immunosuppression Therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Donors , Waiting Lists
5.
Am J Transplant ; 20(11): 3131-3139, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-618776

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spread rapidly nationally, causing widespread emergent changes to the health system. Our goal was to understand the impact of the epidemic on kidney transplantation (KT), at both the national and center levels, accounting statistically for waitlist composition. Using Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data, we compared data on observed waitlist registrations, waitlist mortality, and living-donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants (LDKT/DDKT) March 15-April 30, 2020 to expected events calculated from preepidemic data January 2016-February 2020. There were few changes before March 15, at which point the number of new listings/DDKT/LDKT dropped to 18%/24%/87% below the expected value (all P < .001). Only 12 centers performed LDKT March 15-31; by April 30, 40 centers had resumed LDKT. The decline in new listings and DDKT was greater among states with higher per capita confirmed COVID-19 cases. The number of waitlist deaths was 2.2-fold higher than expected in the 5 states with highest COVID-19 burden (P < .001). DCD DDKT and regional/national imports declined nationwide but most steeply in states with the highest COVID-19 burden. The COVID-19 epidemic has resulted in substantial changes to KT; we must adapt and learn rapidly to continue to provide safe access to transplantation and limit the growing indirect toll of an already deadly disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Kidney Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Living Donors/supply & distribution , Pandemics , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue and Organ Procurement/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Female , Graft Survival , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Renal Insufficiency/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Transplant Recipients , United States/epidemiology , Waiting Lists , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL