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1.
Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare ; 31, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1897671

ABSTRACT

Background A proportion of patients with COVID-19 become critically ill, but few studies describe the functional outcomes and rehabilitation process of these patients. Objective To describe the complications encountered and functional outcomes of critically ill COVID-19 patients requiring intubation and subsequent intensive care unit (ICU) management and rehabilitation. Methods Retrospective case note review was conducted on all patients requiring intubation and ICU admission and subsequently discharged from our hospital from February 15, 2020 to May 1, 2020. Demographics, preexisting medical conditions, complications encountered in ICU, ICU and General Ward Length of Stay, number of therapy sessions delivered, nutritional data, and functional outcomes on discharge were collected from electronic medical records and entered in a deidentified database. Results Most patients developed significant breathlessness affecting post-ICU rehabilitation, a few patients developed ICU associated delirium while no patient developed ICU-associated weakness. All patients survived and could walk 20 m within 12 days post-extubation. Conclusion Early ICU and sustained post-ICU rehabilitation of critically ill, intubated COVID-19 patients is feasible. Further studies could look into the outcomes of this group of patients, in particular the effect of nutrition and pulmonary training on functional outcomes. We strongly recommend an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team approach in managing critically ill COVID-19 patients.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322457

ABSTRACT

Background: Arterial and venous thrombosis are reported to be common in critically ill COVID-19 patients.Method and Results: This is a national multicenter retrospective observational study involving all consecutive adult COVID-19 patients who required intensive care units (ICU) admission between 23 January 2020 and 30 April 2020 in Singapore. 111 patients were included and the venous and arterial thrombotic rates in ICU were 1.8% (n=2) and 9.9% (n=11), respectively. Major bleeding rate was 14.8% (n=16). Conclusions: Critically ill COVID-19 patients in Singapore have lower venous thromboembolism but higher arterial thrombosis rates and bleeding manifestations than other reported cohorts.

3.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 50(9): 686-694, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464249

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 is associated with a high mortality rate, though outcomes of the different lung compliance phenotypes are unclear. We aimed to measure lung compliance and examine other factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 patients with ARDS. METHODS: Adult patients with COVID-19 ARDS who required invasive mechanical ventilation at 8 hospitals in Singapore were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with both mortality and differences between high (<40mL/cm H2O) and low (<40mL/cm H2O) compliance were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients with COVID-19 who required invasive mechanical ventilation were analysed; 15 (14.7%) did not survive. Non-survivors were older (median 70 years, interquartile range [IQR] 67-75 versus median 61 years, IQR 52-66; P<0.01), and required a longer duration of ventilation (26 days, IQR 12-27 vs 8 days, IQR 5-15; P<0.01) and intensive care unit support (26 days, IQR 11-30 vs 11.5 days, IQR 7-17.3; P=0.01), with a higher incidence of acute kidney injury (15 patients [100%] vs 40 patients [46%]; P<0.01). There were 67 patients who had lung compliance data; 24 (35.8%) were classified as having high compliance and 43 (64.2%) as having low compliance. Mortality was higher in patients with high compliance (33.3% vs 11.6%; P=0.03), and was associated with a drop in compliance at day 7 (-9.3mL/cm H2O (IQR -4.5 to -15.4) vs 0.2mL/cm H2O (4.7 to -5.2) P=0.04). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 ARDS patients with higher compliance on the day of intubation and a longitudinal decrease over time had a higher risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Lung Compliance , Phenotype , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):37-38, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1338985

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveArterial and venous thrombosis are reported to be common in critically ill COVID-19 patients.This study aims to describe the thrombotic and bleeding rates in COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) in Singapore.DesignRetrospective observational study involving all consecutive adult COVID-19 patients who required ICU admission between 23 January 2020 and 30 April 2020.SettingNational multicenter study involving all eight public hospitals in Singapore.Patients111 consecutive COVID-19 patients who required ICU admission were included.Measurements and Main ResultsPrimary outcome was any venous or arterial thrombotic events occurred in ICU. Other measures included (1) the overall, venous and arterial thrombotic events throughout the hospitalisation, (2) major and minor bleeding events. The overall thrombotic rate in ICU was 11.7% (n=13), with 1.8% (n=2) venous and 9.9% (n=11) arterial events. The overall thrombotic rates throughout hospitalisation, censored at 30 April 2020, increased to 18.0% (n=20) with 6.3% (n=7) venous and 11.7% (n=13) arterial events. Major and minor bleeding rates were 14.8% (n=16) and 3.7% (n=4), respectively. Two-third of the patients received pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in ICU.ConclusionsCritically ill COVID-19 patients in Singapore have lower VTE but higher arterial thrombosis rates with higher bleeding manifestations than other reported cohorts. Standard thromboprophylaxis may be sufficient to prevent thrombotic complications in patients with similar demographics.

5.
Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare ; : 20101058211035195, 2021.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-1334724

ABSTRACT

BackgroundA proportion of patients with COVID-19 become critically ill, but few studies describe the functional outcomes and rehabilitation process of these patients.ObjectiveTo describe the complications encountered and functional outcomes of critically ill COVID-19 patients requiring intubation and subsequent intensive care unit (ICU) management and rehabilitation.MethodsRetrospective case note review was conducted on all patients requiring intubation and ICU admission and subsequently discharged from our hospital from February 15, 2020 to May 1, 2020. Demographics, preexisting medical conditions, complications encountered in ICU, ICU and General Ward Length of Stay, number of therapy sessions delivered, nutritional data, and functional outcomes on discharge were collected from electronic medical records and entered in a deidentified database.ResultsMost patients developed significant breathlessness affecting post-ICU rehabilitation, a few patients developed ICU associated delirium while no patient developed ICU-associated weakness. All patients survived and could walk 20 m within 12 days post-extubation.ConclusionEarly ICU and sustained post-ICU rehabilitation of critically ill, intubated COVID-19 patients is feasible. Further studies could look into the outcomes of this group of patients, in particular the effect of nutrition and pulmonary training on functional outcomes. We strongly recommend an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team approach in managing critically ill COVID-19 patients.

6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7477, 2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169408

ABSTRACT

We aim to describe a case series of critically and non-critically ill COVID-19 patients in Singapore. This was a multicentered prospective study with clinical and laboratory details. Details for fifty uncomplicated COVID-19 patients and ten who required mechanical ventilation were collected. We compared clinical features between the groups, assessed predictors of intubation, and described ventilatory management in ICU patients. Ventilated patients were significantly older, reported more dyspnea, had elevated C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase. A multivariable logistic regression model identified respiratory rate (aOR 2.83, 95% CI 1.24-6.47) and neutrophil count (aOR 2.39, 95% CI 1.34-4.26) on admission as independent predictors of intubation with area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.928 (95% CI 0.828-0.979). Median APACHE II score was 19 (IQR 17-22) and PaO2/FiO2 ratio before intubation was 104 (IQR 89-129). Median peak FiO2 was 0.75 (IQR 0.6-1.0), positive end-expiratory pressure 12 (IQR 10-14) and plateau pressure 22 (IQR 18-26) in the first 24 h of ventilation. Median duration of ventilation was 6.5 days (IQR 5.5-13). There were no fatalities. Most COVID-19 patients in Singapore who required mechanical ventilation because of ARDS were extubated with no mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Adult , Area Under Curve , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/cytology , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Rate , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Singapore
7.
Thromb J ; 19(1): 14, 2021 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123658

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Arterial and venous thrombosis are reported to be common in critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHOD AND RESULTS: This is a national multicenter retrospective observational study involving all consecutive adult COVID-19 patients who required intensive care units (ICU) admission between 23 January 2020 and 30 April 2020 in Singapore. One hundred eleven patients were included and the venous and arterial thrombotic rates in ICU were 1.8% (n = 2) and 9.9% (n = 11), respectively. Major bleeding rate was 14.8% (n = 16). CONCLUSIONS: Critically ill COVID-19 patients in Singapore have lower venous thromboembolism but higher arterial thrombosis rates and bleeding manifestations than other reported cohorts.

9.
J Ultrason ; 20(81): e154-e158, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-625945

ABSTRACT

Background: Point-of-care bedside lung ultrasound is a diagnostic adjunct in the management of respiratory diseases. We describe the clinical progress and lung ultrasound findings of a Singaporean COVID-19 intensive care unit patient who was diagnosed with COVID-19 infection. Methods: The clinical course of one COVID-19 patient managed in the intensive care unit was traced. The patient was diagnosed with COVID-19 virus infection and intubated after developing respiratory failure. Serial point-of-care bedside lung ultrasound was performed by the managing intensivist daily, and correlated with the clinical progress and chest X-ray imaging done for the patient. Results: The patient exhibited lung ultrasound findings consistent with that described for viral pneumonias. This included numerous B-lines and subpleural consolidations with disrupted pleural lines distributed symmetrically, predominantly in bilateral upper BLUE points, and lower BLUE points bilaterally. Coalescing B-lines leading on to the development of bilateral "white lung" were associated with worsening acute respiratory distress syndrome. An increased density or reduction of the B-lines was associated with clinical improvement or deterioration, respectively. Conclusions: Trained clinicians, who are familiar with point-of-care lung ultrasonography, may consider point-of-care bedside ultrasound as an important adjunct to history and physical examination for the diagnosis and management of COVID-19 when advanced imaging is not available because of logistical reasons or infectious control. This applies in particular to cases where resources are limited, and patient transfers to facilities offering such services may prove hazardous.Background: Point-of-care bedside lung ultrasound is a diagnostic adjunct in the management of respiratory diseases. We describe the clinical progress and lung ultrasound findings of a Singaporean COVID-19 intensive care unit patient who was diagnosed with COVID-19 infection. Methods: The clinical course of one COVID-19 patient managed in the intensive care unit was traced. The patient was diagnosed with COVID-19 virus infection and intubated after developing respiratory failure. Serial point-of-care bedside lung ultrasound was performed by the managing intensivist daily, and correlated with the clinical progress and chest X-ray imaging done for the patient. Results: The patient exhibited lung ultrasound findings consistent with that described for viral pneumonias. This included numerous B-lines and subpleural consolidations with disrupted pleural lines distributed symmetrically, predominantly in bilateral upper BLUE points, and lower BLUE points bilaterally. Coalescing B-lines leading on to the development of bilateral "white lung" were associated with worsening acute respiratory distress syndrome. An increased density or reduction of the B-lines was associated with clinical improvement or deterioration, respectively. Conclusions: Trained clinicians, who are familiar with point-of-care lung ultrasonography, may consider point-of-care bedside ultrasound as an important adjunct to history and physical examination for the diagnosis and management of COVID-19 when advanced imaging is not available because of logistical reasons or infectious control. This applies in particular to cases where resources are limited, and patient transfers to facilities offering such services may prove hazardous.

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