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2.
J Epidemiol Glob Health ; 2022 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783063

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the impact of COVID-19 mitigation measures on the total number of consultations for respiratory and gastrointestinal infections among children under 16 years in Thai Binh Pediatric Hospital, Vietnam during the year 2020. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out to review consecutive consultations occurring in children admitted from January 01, 2016 to December 31, 2020. All medical records were collected from the central numeric database of the hospital. Diagnoses were documented according to the International Classification of Diseases 10 criteria. RESULTS: 436,276 children consulted at the outpatient department during the period of study. A gradual increase in the total number of outpatients was observed from 2016 to 2019, including those consulting for respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. However, the total number of outpatients and the numbers of those consulting for respiratory and gastrointestinal infections dramatically decreased in 2020. A significant decrease of respiratory infections relative proportion was observed in 2020 when compared to 2016-2019 (p < 0.0001). By contrast, the relative proportion of gastrointestinal infections did not significantly vary (p = 0.91). The proportion of outpatients aged under 5 years was significantly lower in 2020 compared to previous years (p < 0.0001). The proportion of male patients was significantly higher in 2020 than from 2016 to 2019 (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Public health measures against the COVID-19 pandemic likely decreased the prevalence of other respiratory tract infections. Further studies are needed to validate the effectiveness of each type of measure. Microbiological studies are also recommended, to better understand the effect of preventive measures.

3.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 2290-2295, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777588

ABSTRACT

One thousand one hundred and nineteen cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant cases have been diagnosed at the Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France, between November 28, 2021, and December 31, 2021. Among the 825 patients with known vaccination status, 383 (46.4%) were vaccinated, of whom 91.9% had received at least two doses of the vaccine. Interestingly, 26.3% of cases developed SARS-CoV-2 infection within 21 days following the last dose of vaccine suggesting possible early production of anti-SARS-CoV-2 facilitating antibodies. Twenty-one patients have been hospitalized, one patient required intensive care, and another patient who received a vaccine booster dose died.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , France/epidemiology , Humans
4.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330799

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The situation of COVID-19 pandemic is becoming more complex. The research institutes should focus on the most important challenge related to this outbreak at the national level. We aim to realize this scoping review to map publications on COVID-19 in Vietnam in order to guide research priorities and policies in the country. Methods: : This study was conducted at the Thai Binh University of Medicine and Pharmacy, from May to August 2020, according to the guidance for conducting systematic scoping review. Results: : A total of 72 studies met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent publications were original articles (27.8%), followed by letter to editor/correspondence (26.4%). According to the research priorities for COVID-19 set by the WHO, 41.7% studies focused on control and prevention of COVID-19, but none of studies on personal protective equipment or protocol for healthcare workers’ safety were conducted. 12.5% studies carried out a thorough investigation into epidemiology of the COVID-19 pandemic in Vietnam. Virology and genomics, natural history of the virus and its transmission in Vietnam were described by 18.1% papers. Only one study was conducted in terms of development for candidate therapeutics. Conclusion: We call for national investigation on treatment against SARS-CoV-2 and protocol for medical staff protection. The government and academic institutions should work in collaboration with international stakeholders, including the WHO, to combat together the COVID-19.

5.
Trop Med Int Health ; 2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752748

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the magnitude of active and recovering COVID-19 patients among at-risk communities and to identify the factors associated with positive serology. METHODS: Four hundred and eighty-three close contacts of COVID-19 patients residing in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, during the fourth wave of the COVID-19 epidemic (September and October 2021) were included. Five weeks after exposure to a COVID-19 patient, they underwent a serology test using the BIOSYNEX COVID-19 BSS kit. RESULTS: The median age of participants was 37 years. A total of 34.6% individuals presented at least one clinical symptom between the time of contact with the COVID-19 patient and inclusion in study. A total of 1.7% unvaccinated individuals tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 using real-time PCR, and 9.5% had evidence of recent infection (positive PCR and/or IgM). A further 26.7% unvaccinated individuals presented evidence of a past infection (positive IgG only). Socio-demographic characteristics, vaccination status and clinical symptoms were not associated with a positive IgM test. CONCLUSION: This is the first serosurvey conducted during the fourth wave of the epidemic in Vietnam. It revealed a seropositivity rate higher than in previous studies and confirmed the hyperendemicity of SARS-CoV-2. Testing using rapid serological tests proved to be a reliable, easy-to-use method and enabled a rapid estimation of the burden of COVID-19.

6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 794550, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742226

ABSTRACT

Smell and taste disorders are frequent symptoms during acute COVID-19 and may persist long after the resolution of the initial phase. This study aims to estimate the proportion and risk factors for smell and/or taste disorders at the onset of symptoms and their persistence after more than 6 months of follow-up in COVID-19 patients. We analyzed a prospective cohort of COVID-19 patients admitted to our institute in Marseille, France in early 2020. After being discharged from the hospital, patients with smell and/or taste disorders were contacted for a telephone interview. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the risk factors for smell and/or taste disorders. A total of 3,737 patients were included, of whom 1,676 reported smell and/or taste disorders at the onset of symptoms. Taste and/or smell disorders were independently associated with being younger and female, a lower likelihood of suffering from diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer, a longer delay between the onset of symptoms and consultation, and non-severe forms of COVID-19 at admission. Of the 605 patients with smell and/or taste disorders who were followed-up, 154 (25.5%) reported the persistence of symptoms for more than 6 months. At the time of follow-up, being female, having a chronic respiratory disease and using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) were factors independently associated with the persistence of smell and/or taste disorders. In conclusion, the long-term persistence of olfactory and gustative disorders is frequent among COVID-19 patients, notably affecting female patients and patients who suffered from chronic respiratory diseases before infection. The role of ACEis needs to be further evaluated in larger numbers of patients.

7.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 894-901, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735490

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 reinfection rate is low. The relative severity of the first and second episodes of infection remains poorly studied. In this study, we aimed at assessing the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 reinfections and comparing the severity of the first and second episodes of infection. We retrospectively included patients with SARS-CoV-2 positive RT-PCR at least 90 days after clinical recovery from a COVID-19 episode and with at least one negative RT-PCR after the first infection. Whole genome sequencing and variant-specific RT-PCR were performed and clinical symptoms and severity of infection were retrospectively documented from medical files. A total of 209 COVID-19 reinfected patients were identified, accounting for 0.4% of positive cases diagnosed from 19 March 2020 to 24 August 2021. Serology was performed in 64 patients, of whom 39 (60.1%) had antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 when sampled at the early stage of their second infection. Only seven patients (3.4%) were infected twice with the same variant. We observed no differences in clinical presentation, hospitalization rate, and transfer to ICU when comparing the two episodes of infections. Our results suggest that the severity of the second episode of COVID-19 is in the same range as that of the first infection, including patients with antibodies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Reinfection , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Whole Genome Sequencing
9.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312417

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiology of all COVID-19 patients in Vietnam and to describe the measures of disease control and prevention implemented. MethodsData were recovered from Wikipedia regarding the 2020 coronavirus pandemic in Vietnam. The period covered was from 23 January to 20 April 2020. Descriptive analysis was stratified by gender, age, country of origin, travel history, clinical symptoms and outcome. A survey of disease control and prevention measures was conducted at the Centre for Disease Control in the Thai Binh province, which is responsible for screening and isolating individuals at high risk of COVID-19. ResultsAs of 20 April 2020, Vietnam had recorded 268 confirmed COVID-19 patients. 55.2% were female. 67.9% were aged 20-49 years and 82.5% were Vietnamese. 60.4% of cases were imported from outside Vietnam. Other cases were acquired in Vietnam by individuals in close contact with imported cases. Only one patient who had not travelled had had no known contact with a confirmed case. 63.1% of patients were asymptomatic. 75.7% of patients were discharged. No deaths were recorded. The Thai Binh CDC surveyed a total of 2,203 persons at risk of COVID-19. 336 persons (15.2%) were isolated at hospitals and 1,411 (64.0%) in dedicated isolation facilities. 16.4% reported at least one respiratory symptom. No positive cases confirmed by RT-PCR have been reported in the Thai Binh province to date. ConclusionThe effect of the systematic screening and isolation strategy made it possible to limit local transmission in Vietnam. Vietnam needs to reinforce diagnostic capacities, prevention measures and provide the necessary epidemiological data on which to base interventions. The wider use of rapid serological tests is also advisable in order to be able to conduct extensive screening in the community.

10.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 41(4): 515-545, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long COVID-19 may affect patients after hospital discharge. AIMS: This study aims to describe the burden of the long-term persistence of clinical symptoms in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review by using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline. The PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies that included information on the prevalence of somatic clinical symptoms lasting at least 4 weeks after the onset of a PCR- or serology-confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. The prevalence of persisting clinical symptoms was assessed and risk factors were described when investigated. Psychological symptoms and cognitive disorders were not evaluated in this study. RESULTS: Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Eighteen studies involved in-patients only with a duration of follow-up of either less than 12 weeks, 12 weeks to 6 months, or more. In these studies, fatigue (16-64%), dyspnea (15-61%), cough (2-59%), arthralgia (8-55%), and thoracic pain (5-62%) were the most frequent persisting symptoms. In nineteen studies conducted in a majority of out-patients, the persistence of these symptoms was lower and 3% to 74% of patients reported prolonged smell and taste disorders. The main risk factors for persisting symptoms were being female, older, having comorbidities and severity at the acute phase of the disease. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients should have access to dedicated multidisciplinary healthcare allowing a holistic approach. Effective outpatient care for patients with long-COVID-19 requires coordination across multiple sub-specialties, which can be proposed in specialized post-COVID units.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 46: 102277, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We describe the epidemiology of the first cases diagnosed in our institute of infections with the SARS-CoV-2 Beta variant and how this variant was imported to Marseille. METHODS: The Beta variant was identified based on analyses of sequences of viral genomes or of a spike gene fragment obtained by next-generation sequencing using Illumina technology, or by a real-time reverse-transcription-PCR (qPCR) specific of the Beta variant. RESULTS: The first patient diagnosed as infected with the SARS-CoV-2 Beta variant was sampled on January 15, 2021. Twenty-nine patients were diagnosed in January 2021 (two weeks). Fifteen (52%) patients were of Comorian nationality. Eight (28%) had travelled abroad, including six who had returned from Comoros. Phylogeny based on SARS-CoV-2 genomes from 11 of these patients and their best BLAST hits from the GISAID database showed that seven patients, including the four returning from Comoros, were clustered with 27 other genomes from GISAID that included the six first Beta variant genomes described in Comoros in January 2021. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses highlight that, as for the case of other SARS-CoV-2 variants that have been diagnosed in Marseille, the Beta variant was imported to Marseille through travel from abroad. It had limited spread in our geographical area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comoros/epidemiology , Genome, Viral , Humans , Mutation , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
12.
Bioengineered ; 13(2): 3797-3809, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655951

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) has spread globally with catastrophic damages to the public health, social and economy since the beginning of the outbreak. In 2020, Southeast Asia proved that it could prevent the worst effects of a pandemic through the closure of activities and borders and movement restriction, as well as social distancing. Nevertheless, with the occurrence of the common variants of concern (VOCs), especially Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), Delta (B.1.617.2), Southeast Asia is facing a significant increase in the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections. Now, the area also has the threats of the spreading out of the dangerous variant - Omicron (B.1.1.529) from other close countries or regions. COVID-19 countermeasures such as closures and social distancing seem to be insufficient. Moreover, Southeast Asia is being held back by a shortage of vaccines and other medical resources. This work focuses on describing the COVID-19 situation, the virus variants, and the coverage of COVID-19 vaccination in the area. We also provide perspectives on the COVID-19 vaccine distribution, protecting the economic capitals, developing the green zone, and the importance of finding more vaccine supplies in Southeast Asia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Asia, Southeastern , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
14.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 45: 102236, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641695

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to challenge the hypothesis of an introduction of influenza viruses by international travellers and subsequent local circulation in Marseille, France. METHODS: We analysed the epidemiological data of PCR-confirmed cases over an eight-year period and compared the genomic data of local and imported influenza viruses during a six-month period. RESULTS: Between June 2013 and December 2020, 12,434 patients in the Assistance Publique-Hospitaux de Marseille were diagnosed with an influenza virus infection at the laboratory of the Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranéee Infection of Marseille. Half of the patients were below the age of 20. Most of the imported cases were diagnosed outside of epidemic periods. Fourteen genomes of the influenza A virus, including six in international travellers returning from Europe or from the Arabian Peninsula and eight from patients who had not travelled were analysed. Sequences of influenza A/H1N1 virus genomes detected in subjects who had travelled to Saudi Arabia were in the same clade and differed from sequences detected later in a traveller returning from Italy, and in non-travellers who were infected in Marseille. This suggests that influenza viruses imported from Saudi Arabia did not subsequently circulate in Marseille. CONCLUSION: Future studies with higher numbers of genomes are needed to confirm this result.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human , France/epidemiology , Genomics , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Travel
17.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the clinical severity in patients who were coinfected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and rhinovirus or monoinfected with a single one of these viruses. METHODS: The study period ranged from 1 March 2020 to 28 February 2021 (one year). SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses were identified by real-time reverse-transcription-PCR as part of the routine work at Marseille University hospitals. Bacterial and fungal infections were detected by standard methods. Clinical data were retrospectively collected from medical files. This study was approved by the ethical committee of our institute. RESULTS: A total of 6034/15,157 (40%) tested patients were positive for at least one respiratory virus. Ninety-three (4.3%) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients were coinfected with another respiratory virus, with rhinovirus being the most frequent (62/93, 67%). Patients coinfected with SARS-CoV-2 and rhinovirus were significantly more likely to report a cough than those with SARS-CoV-2 monoinfection (62% vs. 31%; p = 0.0008). In addition, they were also significantly more likely to report dyspnea than patients with rhinovirus monoinfection (45% vs. 36%; p = 0.02). They were also more likely to be transferred to an intensive care unit and to die than patients with rhinovirus monoinfection (16% vs. 5% and 7% vs. 2%, respectively) but these differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: A close surveillance and investigation of the co-incidence and interactions of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses is needed. The possible higher risk of increased clinical severity in SARS-CoV-2-positive patients coinfected with rhinovirus warrants further large scale studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Picornaviridae Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Coinfection/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Picornaviridae Infections/diagnosis , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Retrospective Studies , Rhinovirus , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
20.
Infect Genet Evol ; 95: 105092, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433676

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare the demographics, clinical characteristics and severity of patients infected with nine different SARS-CoV-2 variants, during three phases of the COVID-19 epidemic in Marseille. METHODS: A single centre retrospective cohort study was conducted in 1760 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 of Nextstrain clades 20A, 20B, and 20C (first phase, February-May 2020), Pangolin lineages B.1.177 (we named Marseille-2) and B.1.160 (Marseille-4) variants (second phase, June-December 2020), and B.1.1.7 (alpha), B.1.351 (beta), P.1 (gamma) and A.27 (Marseille-501) variants (third phase, January 2021-today). Outcomes were the occurrence of clinical failures, including hospitalisation, transfer to the intensive-care unit, and death. RESULTS: During each phase, no major differences were observed with regards to age and gender distribution, the prevalence of chronic diseases, and clinical symptoms between variants circulating in a given phase. The B.1.177 and B.1.160 variants were associated with more severe outcomes. Infections occurring during the second phase were associated with a higher rate of death as compared to infections during the first and third phases. Patients in the second phase were more likely to be hospitalised than those in the third phase. Patients infected during the third phase were more frequently obese than others. CONCLUSION: A large cohort study is recommended to evaluate the transmissibility and to better characterise the clinical severity of emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Genome, Viral , Hypertension/pathology , Obesity/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Female , France/epidemiology , Genotype , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/mortality , Heart Diseases/pathology , Heart Diseases/virology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/virology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/mortality , Obesity/virology , Phylogeny , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
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