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1.
Med (N Y) ; 3(4): 233-248.e6, 2022 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882364

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop a febrile pro-inflammatory cytokinemia with accelerated progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here we report the results of a phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous (IV) plasma-purified alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) for moderate to severe ARDS secondary to COVID-19 (EudraCT 2020-001391-15). Methods: Patients (n = 36) were randomized to receive weekly placebo, weekly AAT (Prolastin, Grifols, S.A.; 120 mg/kg), or AAT once followed by weekly placebo. The primary endpoint was the change in plasma interleukin (IL)-6 concentration at 1 week. In addition to assessing safety and tolerability, changes in plasma levels of IL-1ß, IL-8, IL-10, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) and clinical outcomes were assessed as secondary endpoints. Findings: Treatment with IV AAT resulted in decreased inflammation and was safe and well tolerated. The study met its primary endpoint, with decreased circulating IL-6 concentrations at 1 week in the treatment group. This was in contrast to the placebo group, where IL-6 was increased. Similarly, plasma sTNFR1 was substantially decreased in the treatment group while remaining unchanged in patients receiving placebo. IV AAT did not definitively reduce levels of IL-1ß, IL-8, and IL-10. No difference in mortality or ventilator-free days was observed between groups, although a trend toward decreased time on ventilator was observed in AAT-treated patients. Conclusions: In patients with COVID-19 and moderate to severe ARDS, treatment with IV AAT was safe, feasible, and biochemically efficacious. The data support progression to a phase 3 trial and prompt further investigation of AAT as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic. Funding: ECSA-2020-009; Elaine Galwey Research Bursary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Interleukin-10/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/therapeutic use , Interleukin-8/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/therapeutic use , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency/drug therapy
2.
EBioMedicine ; 77: 103894, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703667

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is elevated in SARS-CoV-2 infection. IL-6 regulates acute-phase proteins, such as alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a key lung anti-protease. We investigated the protease-anti-protease balance in the circulation and pulmonary compartments in SARS-CoV-2 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) compared to non-SARS-CoV-2 ARDS (nsARDS) and the effects of tocilizumab (IL-6 receptor antagonist) on anti-protease defence in SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: Levels and activity of AAT and neutrophil elastase (NE) were measured in plasma, airway tissue and tracheal secretions (TA) of people with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS or nsARDS. AAT and IL-6 levels were evaluated in people with moderate SARS-CoV-2 infection who received standard of care +/- tocilizumab. FINDINGS: AAT plasma levels doubled in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. In lung parenchyma AAT levels were increased, as was the percentage of neutrophils involved in NET formation. A protease-anti-protease imbalance was detected in TA with active NE and no active AAT. The airway anti-protease, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor was decreased in SARS-CoV-2-infected lungs and cleaved in TA. In nsARDS, plasma AAT levels were elevated but TA samples had less AAT cleavage, with no detectable active NE in most samples. Induction of AAT in ARDS occurred mainly through IL-6. Tocilizumab down-regulated AAT during SARS-CoV-2 infection. INTERPRETATION: There is a protease-anti-protease imbalance in the airways of SARS-CoV-2-ARDS patients. This imbalance is a target for anti-protease therapy. FUNDING: NIH Serological Sciences Network, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Peptide Hydrolases , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 20, 2021 Jan 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388819

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to characterize the effects of prone positioning on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in invasively ventilated patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. RESULTS: This was a prospective cohort study in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary referral centre. We included 20 consecutive, invasively ventilated patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 related ARDS who underwent prone positioning in ICU as part of their management. The main outcome was the effect of prone positioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics. There was a median improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 132 in the prone position compared to the supine position (IQR 67-228). We observed lower PaO2/FiO2 ratios in those with low (< median) baseline respiratory system static compliance, compared to those with higher (> median) static compliance (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in respiratory system static compliance with prone positioning. Prone positioning was effective in improving oxygenation in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. Furthermore, poor respiratory system static compliance was common and was associated with disease severity. Improvements in oxygenation were partly due to lung recruitment. Prone positioning should be considered in patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Lung/metabolism , Prone Position , COVID-19/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/metabolism , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial
4.
Anesthesiology ; 134(5): 792-808, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202432

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by hypoxemia, altered alveolar-capillary permeability, and neutrophil-dominated inflammatory pulmonary edema. Despite decades of research, an effective drug therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome remains elusive. The ideal pharmacotherapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome should demonstrate antiprotease activity and target injurious inflammatory pathways while maintaining host defense against infection. Furthermore, a drug with a reputable safety profile, low possibility of off-target effects, and well-known pharmacokinetics would be desirable. The endogenous 52-kd serine protease α1-antitrypsin has the potential to be a novel treatment option for acute respiratory distress syndrome. The main function of α1-antitrypsin is as an antiprotease, targeting neutrophil elastase in particular. However, studies have also highlighted the role of α1-antitrypsin in the modulation of inflammation and bacterial clearance. In light of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the identification of a treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome is even more pertinent, and α1-antitrypsin has been implicated in the inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Neutrophils/drug effects , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/administration & dosage , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/enzymology , Lung/immunology , Neutrophils/enzymology , Neutrophils/immunology , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/enzymology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology
5.
Anesthesiology ; 134(5): 792-808, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135903

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by hypoxemia, altered alveolar-capillary permeability, and neutrophil-dominated inflammatory pulmonary edema. Despite decades of research, an effective drug therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome remains elusive. The ideal pharmacotherapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome should demonstrate antiprotease activity and target injurious inflammatory pathways while maintaining host defense against infection. Furthermore, a drug with a reputable safety profile, low possibility of off-target effects, and well-known pharmacokinetics would be desirable. The endogenous 52-kd serine protease α1-antitrypsin has the potential to be a novel treatment option for acute respiratory distress syndrome. The main function of α1-antitrypsin is as an antiprotease, targeting neutrophil elastase in particular. However, studies have also highlighted the role of α1-antitrypsin in the modulation of inflammation and bacterial clearance. In light of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the identification of a treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome is even more pertinent, and α1-antitrypsin has been implicated in the inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Neutrophils/drug effects , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/administration & dosage , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/enzymology , Lung/immunology , Neutrophils/enzymology , Neutrophils/immunology , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/enzymology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology
6.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 202(6): 812-821, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614625

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a global threat to health. Its inflammatory characteristics are incompletely understood.Objectives: To define the cytokine profile of COVID-19 and to identify evidence of immunometabolic alterations in those with severe illness.Methods: Levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and sTNFR1 (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1) were assessed in plasma from healthy volunteers, hospitalized but stable patients with COVID-19 (COVIDstable patients), patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission (COVIDICU patients), and patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia requiring ICU support (CAPICU patients). Immunometabolic markers were measured in circulating neutrophils from patients with severe COVID-19. The acute phase response of AAT (alpha-1 antitrypsin) to COVID-19 was also evaluated.Measurements and Main Results: IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, and sTNFR1 were all increased in patients with COVID-19. COVIDICU patients could be clearly differentiated from COVIDstable patients, and demonstrated higher levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, and sTNFR1 but lower IL-10 than CAPICU patients. COVID-19 neutrophils displayed altered immunometabolism, with increased cytosolic PKM2 (pyruvate kinase M2), phosphorylated PKM2, HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1α), and lactate. The production and sialylation of AAT increased in COVID-19, but this antiinflammatory response was overwhelmed in severe illness, with the IL-6:AAT ratio markedly higher in patients requiring ICU admission (P < 0.0001). In critically unwell patients with COVID-19, increases in IL-6:AAT predicted prolonged ICU stay and mortality, whereas improvement in IL-6:AAT was associated with clinical resolution (P < 0.0001).Conclusions: The COVID-19 cytokinemia is distinct from that of other types of pneumonia, leading to organ failure and ICU need. Neutrophils undergo immunometabolic reprogramming in severe COVID-19 illness. Cytokine ratios may predict outcomes in this population.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Reaction/immunology , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Cytokines/immunology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Lactic Acid/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Thyroid Hormones/metabolism , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology , Acute-Phase Reaction/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Blotting, Western , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/immunology , Community-Acquired Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pandemics , Phosphorylation , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/metabolism
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