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1.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 949, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962837

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic led to increased work-related strain and psychosocial burden in nurses worldwide, resulting in high prevalences of mental health problems. Nurses in long-term care facilities seem to be especially affected by the pandemic. Nevertheless, there are few findings indicating possible positive changes for health care workers. Therefore, we investigated which psychosocial burdens and potential positive aspects nurses working in long-term care facilities experience during the Covid-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a mixed-methods study among nurses and nursing assistants working in nursing homes in Germany. The survey contained the third German version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ III). Using Welch's t-tests, we compared the COPSOQ results of our sample against a pre-pandemic reference group of geriatric nurses from Germany. Additionally, we conducted semi-structured interviews with geriatric nurses with a special focus on psychosocial stress, to reach a deeper understanding of their experiences on work-related changes and burdens during the pandemic. Data were analysed using thematic coding (Braun and Clarke). RESULTS: Our survey sample (n = 177) differed significantly from the pre-pandemic reference group in 14 out of 31 COPSOQ scales. Almost all of these differences indicated negative changes. Our sample scored significantly worse regarding the scales 'quantitative demands', 'hiding emotions', 'work-privacy conflicts', 'role conflicts', 'quality of leadership', 'support at work', 'recognition', 'physical demands', 'intention to leave profession', 'burnout', 'presenteeism' and 'inability to relax'. The interviews (n = 15) revealed six main themes related to nurses' psychosocial stress: 'overall working conditions', 'concern for residents', 'management of relatives', 'inability to provide terminal care', 'tensions between being infected and infecting others' and 'technicisation of care'. 'Enhanced community cohesion' (interviews), 'meaning of work' and 'quantity of social relations' (COPSOQ III) were identified as positive effects of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Results clearly illustrate an aggravation of geriatric nurses' situation and psychosocial burden and only few positive changes due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Pre-existing hardships seem to have further deteriorated and new stressors added to nurses' strain. The perceived erosion of care, due to an overemphasis of the technical in relation to the social and emotional dimensions of care, seems to be especially burdensome to geriatric nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
2.
BMJ Open ; 12(6): e058266, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902003

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In order to better understand the continued barriers to the provision of vascular endothelial inhibitor therapy, this study aims to investigate patients' experiences with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in Germany during the injection process and how they deal with it. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: This analysis is part of the qualitative arm of a wider mixed-methods study. We recruited participants all over Germany via ophthalmologists, eye clinics, general practitioners, care bases and support groups between June 2018 and December 2020 and selected a subsample of study participants with nvAMD who were either undergoing or had previously undergone vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor therapy. We conducted narrative, semistructured, face-to-face interviews at the participants' homes, which were audio-recorded. The interviews were thematically analysed. RESULTS: Twenty-two participants were included in this analysis. Experiencing neovascular macular degeneration was dominated by the injection experience. Study participants perceived the treatment with vascular endothelial inhibitor injections as uncomfortable, and they described undergoing varying levels of anxiety during the whole injection process. After some years of receiving multiple injections, the pain and not experiencing any positive effects made participants with significant vision loss want to discontinue therapy. Furthermore, they narrated negative injection experiences in association with their interactions with medical staff and doctors. CONCLUSION: Although time in the medical setting is limited, efficient and good doctor-patient relationships seem crucial for satisfying care experiences. A respectful and humane relationship may be one key to achieving treatment adherence.


Subject(s)
Intravitreal Injections , Macular Degeneration , Wet Macular Degeneration , Angiogenesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Germany , Humans , Intravitreal Injections/psychology , Macular Degeneration/drug therapy , Macular Degeneration/psychology , Qualitative Research , Ranibizumab , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/antagonists & inhibitors , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/therapeutic use , Wet Macular Degeneration/drug therapy , Wet Macular Degeneration/psychology
3.
Rural Remote Health ; 22(2): 6658, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1893584

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Evidence on the association of socioeconomic deprivation with occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is available from international studies and urban settings in western Germany. This study aimed to assess this association based on small geographical areas in a rural setting in eastern Germany. METHODS: This study used routine data of all patients with AMI who were treated in the Hospital Brandenburg in the city of Brandenburg, Germany, between May 2019 and May 2020. Hospitalisation rates of AMI were calculated for postal code regions that were located within the catchment area of the Hospital Brandenburg. Poisson regression was used to compare hospitalisation rates in areas with medium socioeconomic deprivation to areas with high deprivation, controlling for age group, sex and period (before or during COVID-19 pandemic). Publicly available social, infrastructure and healthcare-related features were mapped to characterise the study region. RESULTS: In total, 265 cases of AMI were registered in the study area, which comprised 116,126 inhabitants. The city of Brandenburg was characterised by the highest level of socioeconomic deprivation, while neighbouring areas showed a rural settlement structure and medium levels of deprivation. The number of general practitioners per 10 000 inhabitants did not differ between both areas. The adjusted rate ratio comparing hospitalisations due to AMI in areas with medium socioeconomic deprivation to areas with high socioeconomic deprivation was 0.71 (95%CI 0.56-0.91, p=0.01). CONCLUSION: This study adds evidence about the association of socioeconomic deprivation and AMI occurrence from a rural area in eastern Germany. Further research about the relationship of socioeconomic deprivation and cardiovascular health is needed from heterogeneous contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Germany/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Socioeconomic Factors
4.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e048212, 2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467703

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: German government regulations such as physical distancing and limited group numbers, designed to curb the spread of COVID-19, have had far-reaching consequences for the very foundations of social life. They have, to name only a few, transformed greetings and goodbyes, blurred private and public worlds, and complicated basic communication with mandatory mask wearing. The ethnographic study CoronaCare investigates how these sociopolitical measures affect social health, a form of health which unfolds through and across social relations. It explores how caring as a fundamental human activity and one integral to sustaining social health is impacted when in-person and person-to-person contacts are restricted and everyone is radically redefined as at risk from others and a risk to others. It explores care relationships, relationships involving the giving or receiving of care in everyday life, institutional settings such as an assisted living facility, and informal settings, such as a housing block. Inside of the pandemic, relationships are a pivotal site at which the negotiation of caring and risk is intensified and where the consequences for social health and social life more generally are pronounced. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This ethnographic project aims to understand the tensions that arise in the lives of individuals and communities living under the sociopolitical regulations and to analyse the tacit forms of practice that individuals and communities develop to uphold social health. Fueled by citizen science, the ethnography uses a variety of methods namely telephone and video interviews with 60-70 research participants, the collection of ethnographic material including video and audio diaries, storyboards, first-person camera footage, photographs and a survey to enrich the sample description based on the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. The analysis will draw on elements of grounded theory and through the aid of the qualitative software MAXQDA it will rigorously document and explain how the social regulations are (re)shaping our ability to be cared for and to care for one another. The survey data will be analysed through the use of the quantitative software programme R. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The ethics committee of the Brandenburg Medical School Theodor Fontane has approved the project (E-01-20200605). The dissemination strategy includes publications in medical, sociological and research methods journals, as well as a stakeholder discussion with political and civil society leaders where the research team will present its recommendations for future pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anthropology, Cultural , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
BMC Emerg Med ; 21(1): 42, 2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169949

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown a decrease of admissions to accident and emergency (A&E) departments after the local outbreaks of COVID-19. However, differential trends of admission counts, for example according to diagnosis, are less well understood. This information is crucial to inform targeted intervention. Therefore, we aimed to compare admission counts in German A&E departments before and after 12th march in 2020 with 2019 according to demographic factors and diagnosis groups. METHODS: Routine data of all admissions between 02.12.2019-30.06.2020 and 01.12.2018-30.06.2019 was available from six hospitals in five cities from north-western, eastern, south-eastern, and south-western Germany. We defined 10 diagnosis groups using ICD-10 codes: mental disorders due to use of alcohol (MDA), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), heart failure, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cholelithiasis or cholecystitis, back pain, fractures of the forearm, and fractures of the femur. We calculated rate ratios comparing different periods in 12.03.2020-30.06.2020 with 12.03.2019-30.06.2019. RESULTS: Forty-one thousand three hundred fifty-three cases were admitted between 12.03.2020-30.06.2020 and 51,030 cases between 12.03.2019-30.06.2019. Admission counts prior to 12.03. were equal in 2020 and 2019. In the period after 12.03., the decrease of admissions in 2020 compared to 2019 was largest between 26.03. and 08.04. (- 30%, 95% CI - 33% to - 27%). When analysing the entire period 12.03.-30.06., the decrease of admissions was heterogeneous among hospitals, and larger among people aged 0-17 years compared to older age groups. In the first 8 weeks after 12.03., admission counts of all diagnoses except femur fractures and pneumonia declined. Admissions with pneumonia increased in this early period. Between 07.05. and 30.6.2020, we noted that admissions with AMI (+ 13%, 95% CI - 3% to + 32%) and cholelithiasis or cholecystitis (+ 20%, 95% CI + 1% to + 44%) were higher than in 2019. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest differential trends of admission counts according to age, location, and diagnosis. An initial decrease of admissions with MDA, AMI, stroke or TIA, heart failure, COPD, cholelithiasis or cholecystitis, and back pain imply delays of emergency care in Germany. Finally, our study suggests a delayed increase of admissions with AMI and cholelithiasis or cholecystitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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