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1.
Health Education and Health Promotion ; 10(1):1-12, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1989889

ABSTRACT

Aims: This study aimed to assess the impact of Benson's Relaxation Technique (PRT) on psychological distress and sleep quality among older people's during COVID 19 pandemic. Instrument & Methods: A quasi‐experimental research design was used to achieve the aim of this study. 95 elders, recruited randomly as follows;50 from Geriatric social club in Zagazig City, 20 from El‐Resala geriatric house in Zagazig City, and 25 from geriatric home in Met Ghamr City. Three tools were utilized for data collection, namely, Interview questionnaire sheet, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) for measuring depression, anxiety as well as stress, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for measuring sleep quality. Findings: More than three‐quarters of the participants had chronic diseases. The majority had unsatisfactory knowledge about Benson's Relaxation Technique at the pre‐intervention phase. Two thirds of elders had severe depression level;slightly less than two thirds had severe anxiety, about three quarters had severe stress at the pre‐intervention phase with statistical significant reduction post intervention phase. The majority had poor sleep quality (97.9%) at the pre‐intervention phase, which decreased at the post‐intervention phase to 50.5%. Conclusion: This study concluded that. Benson's Relaxation Technique have great effect on psychological distress and sleep quality of elderly people. Gero‐psychiatric nurses should encourage elderly people to apply BRT for enhancement of their psychological wellbeing. © 2022, Tarbiat Modares University. All rights reserved.

2.
Annals of Behavioral Medicine ; 56(SUPP 1):S633-S633, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1848741
3.
Thorax ; 76(Suppl 2):A26-A27, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1505867

ABSTRACT

Introduction and ObjectiveThe COVID-19 pandemic has witnessed a reduction in asthma exacerbations in the UK. Several factors may underpin this, including reduced transmission of seasonal viruses and improved use of or adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). This study aims to investigate whether ICS use has changed during the pandemic for patients with asthma.MethodsUsing the OpenPrescribing database, we analysed prescribing patterns of ICS, salbutamol and peak flow meters from January 2019 to January 2021 across England. Additionally, using a sample asthma cohort from 3 primary care practices, we assessed individual prescription patterns and ICS adherence across the two-year period. ICS adherence has been defined according to the medication possession (MPR) ratio: good (≥75%), sub-optimal (50–74%), poor (25–49%) and non-adherence (<25%).ResultsA sharp increase in national ICS prescriptions was observed at the start of the pandemic in March 2020 representing a 50% increase compared to February 2020. Thereafter national ICS prescription rates appear to have returned to normal levels. The sample asthma cohort included 1132 patients (762 patients treated with ICS across 2019 and 2020). Overall, adherence to ICS improved in 2020 (P<0.001), with the proportion of patients meeting ‘good adherence’ (≥75%) increasing from 34% to 42% (P<0.001). Analysis of this cohort suggested the March 2020 spike predominantly reflected improved adherence rather than a hoarding effect of multiple inhalers or new prescriptions for ICS-naïve individuals. Increasing age was associated with higher levels of ICS adherence. A similar spike in salbutamol occurred in March 2020, however, an overall reduction in salbutamol prescriptions was seen in 2020 (P=0.039). National figures highlighted a progressive increase in prescription of peak flow meters over 2020.ConclusionA marked spike in national ICS prescriptions occurred in March 2020. This increase appears to reflect improved adherence in patients with low levels of adherence rather than a hoarding effect or large-scale initiation in ICS-naïve patients. Despite a comparable spike in salbutamol prescriptions, 2020 saw an overall reduction in salbutamol prescriptions. Prescription of peak flow meters steadily increased over 2020 in keeping with the need for more remote monitoring.

4.
Revue d'Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique ; 69:S56, 2021.
Article in French | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1240590

ABSTRACT

Introduction Dans le but de réduire le nombre de personnes infectées par la COVID-19, plusieurs pays ont mis en œuvre des applications mobiles pour retracer les contacts étroits de la personne infectée par le SARS-CoV-2. Cependant, cette approche nécessite une large adhésion de la population pour être efficace. Cependant, depuis mars, de telles applications n’ont été installées que par 9,3 % des personnes dans le monde. Nos objectifs étaient d’estimer, en France, l’acceptabilité d’une application utilisant les téléphones mobiles pour retracer les contacts étroits entre les personnes lors d’épidémies, et les barrières potentielles à son utilisation. Méthodes Nos données ont été collectées parallèlement à l’enquête « Health Literacy Survey 2019 » réalisée en ligne auprès de 1003 français deux semaines après la fin du premier confinement en France (du 27 mai au 5 juin 2020). Les données utilisées étaient les caractéristiques sociodémographiques, la littératie en santé, la confiance dans les institutions et les connaissances sur la COVID-19 et les comportements préventifs. L’acceptabilité d’une application mobile de traçage a été mesurée par le biais d’une question ad hoc, dont les réponses ont été regroupées en trois modalités : App-partisan, App-favorable et App-réticent. Résultats Seulement 19,2 % étaient des partisans de l’application tandis que la moitié des participants (50,3 %) étaient réticents. Les facteurs associés à la non-réticence (App-adepte, App-favorable) étaient : l‘absence de difficultés financières et l’utilité perçue d’applications mobiles pour envoyer des questionnaires de santé aux médecins. L’âge de plus de 60 ans, la confiance dans les représentants politiques, les préoccupations envers la situation pandémique et des connaissances adéquates sur la transmission du SARS-CoV-2 augmentaient la probabilité d’adhérer complétement à l’application de traçage. Conclusion Les personnes les plus démunies, connues pour être plus à risque d’être atteintes par la COVID-19, sont également les plus réticentes à utiliser une application de traçage des contacts. Par conséquent, une adhésion optimale nécessite de mieux comprendre ces réticences et de larges campagnes de sensibilisation, proposant un discours rationalisé sur les avantages de santé publique d’adopter une telle application.

5.
Journal of Youth and Theology ; 35(3):1-25, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1153762
6.
ACM SIGGRAPH 2020 Panels - International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 2020 ; 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-879703

ABSTRACT

This panel brings together academics and practitioners to discuss the structural problems facing visual effects within the film and television industry today. This discussion is organized around four sub-Topics: 1) labor solutions and what unionization would mean, 2) perceptions of VFX artists and their contributions within the industry by filmmakers and artists themselves, as well as the audience, 3) issues of inclusivity along gender and racial lines, and their effects on work/life balances, and 4) VFX as equal creative partners rather than isolated, temporary, highly-skilled specialists. This panel is a continuation of work begun by the faculty and practitioner organizers, Heath Hanlin (Syracuse University, VPA) and Shaina Holmes (Syracuse University, Newhouse) on studying structural challenges and obstacles to entry for students hoping to enter the VFX industry, in particular women, and artists of color. An earlier iteration of this discussion was held at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival. The hope is that the technical focus and high attendance by industry practitioners at Siggraph, adds practitioner perspectives and educator feedback to the sub-Topics listed above. Simply put, today's film and television industry rely heavily on visual effects, both to advance the story or as a means to hide imperfections to keep the audience engaged without technical distractions. Traditional conceptions of VFX artistry as a production step that comes after primary cinematography is simply outdated. Unfortunately, the economic and work-flow structure of the industry accepts this new reality while at the same time attempting to compensate, credit, and organize VFX artists within the outdated framework. Often this aspect of the conversation is moored in debates surrounding the potentiality of AI to either positively impact the industry (no more underpaid routinized tasks for artists) or negatively (crafts persons and artists can be replaced by algorithms). Rather, a more fruitful discussion around this point should be centered on labor issues and globalization (sub-Topic #1) of VFX within the industry to reflect the VFX Artist's increased importance in most contemporary productions. This new economic bargaining power cannot be established if we first don't engage with, educate, and change the discourse surrounding how other creatives in the industry view VFX artists (sub-Topic #2) and their critical roles. This panel discusses the stereotype of today's VFX workers as "easily trainable, easily replaceable, ĝ€button-pushers', who can be substituted with intuitive AI"and how we can shift the narrative artisans and craft persons working on the level of a writer, director, or editor, using their talents to equally construct the narrative vision of the piece. The film and television industry relies so heavily on VFX artists for their visions, that similar to the video game industry, long hours are required from those artists who toil away behind a monitor and keyboard. At the same time, similar to the film and television industry as a whole, it is overly represented by majority white male workers who also disproportionately are not responsible for childcare and its accompanying social and emotional labor. As such, VFX professionals, who are women, find themselves working within an unregulated part of the industry working over 100 hours per week on a project to project basis, not knowing what city, let alone country, their next job will be in, and if they will have time to dedicate to supporting, or even starting, a family (see sub-Topic #3). This panel discussion hopes to expand these voices and their perception on solutions to inclusivity within the industry. Issues of equality are revealed in a broader sense when we realize VFX artists need to be recognized more as equal creative partners (see sub-Topic #2) due to their increased reliance upon and importance in the contemporary digital workflow of content creation and visual storytelling. More than merely surveying other creators' perceptions of VFX artists' contributions, there eeds to be new contractual precedents and workflow procedures established in order to accomplish structural changes. For example, VFX artists need to be at the beginning of production choices, not merely as pre-visualization workers, but as co-creators and organized division heads who can ready their departments for the production troubleshooting invariably ahead. VFX need not be an afterthought-not secondary "fixers"who through a combination of creativity and technical know-how, solve problems quickly with little to no additional compensation. Rather, they need to be co-leaders beginning right from pre-production until post as co-creatives. This discussion amongst the panelists is expected to explore the topics above, but also expand and evolve into new conversations and connections to the artist, technology, industry, globalization, COVID-19 impact, and education spaces. Towards the end of the dialogue, we will invite the audience to participate by asking questions to the panel for open discussion and sharing their own knowledge and experiences. © 2020 Owner/Author.

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