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1.
J Nutr Sci ; 11: e64, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972473

ABSTRACT

Marketing influences consumers' dietary purchases. However, little is known about marketing environments in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-authorised stores. The present study explored SNAP-authorised store marketing environments in Louisiana by rurality, store ownership and store type (n 42). Sampling methods were designed to include randomly selected stores in each geographic area of the state. The GroPromo was used to measure placement, promotion, and child-focused aspects of marketing strategies used for healthier (fruits and vegetables) and less healthy products (chips, candy, sugar-sweetened beverages, child-focused cereal) in medium- and high-prominence marketing areas. In using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) (P < 0⋅05) for data analysis, variations in GroPromo scores were found among SNAP-authorised stores by rurality (P < 0⋅05) and store ownership (P < 0⋅001); no differences were found by store type (P > 0⋅05). Future research, practice and policy strategies are required to understand the influence of marketing environments on SNAP participants' dietary quality and to design responsive public health interventions.


Subject(s)
Food Assistance , Beverages , Commerce , Food Supply , Humans , Marketing , Poverty
2.
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior ; 53(7):S75-S76, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1828985

ABSTRACT

The Louisiana Healthy Communities Initiative, led by the LSU AgCenter, guides SNAP-Ed policy, systems, and environmental change efforts. Prior to COVID19, agents held in-person community forums to gather input and community priorities for interventions. COVID19 spurred innovation in this process. Although many states have used videoconferencing services to host meetings, lack of functional internet access posed a barrier for many communities in Louisiana.To gather broad community input through Qualtrics surveys in order to assess needs and assets, guide project prioritization, and gather feedback on previous projects.Qualtrics surveys were distributed via email to community members, stakeholders, and partners serving low-income audiences. Three surveys solicited feedback for existing Healthy Communities coalitions (n = 45);1 survey gathered initial input for a newly formed Healthy Communities coalition (n = 63). The overall response rate across all surveys was 23.6%.Survey responses to community health and engagement questions were separated by counties and analyzed through qualitative content analysis. The research team worked with Extension agents to conduct member checking through discussing survey results with participants.One hundred and eight responses were received from 4 communities. Extension agents reported high satisfaction with the process. Surveys provided action items and potential new coalition members. Across all 4 communities, common themes included acknowledging racial health disparities, a need for greater community involvement in coalition efforts, and a lack of healthy food options.Qualtrics surveys were an effective way to gather community input and allowed wider participation than would have been possible with a virtual meeting. Post-COVID, agents plan to continue to solicit community input through Qualtrics surveys, in addition to face-to-face forums. This method is a valuable tool for lower-income and rural communities. Results reflected an awareness of low community engagement, racial health disparities and limited healthy food access.

3.
Prev Med Rep ; 24: 101578, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440295

ABSTRACT

Healthy food retail strategies are delivered by Cooperative Extension Services in Louisiana to improve public health among communities with lower income. To guide Cooperative Extension Services Programming, the aim of this study was to assess healthy food access among SNAP-authorized stores. This included comparing the availability, affordability, and quality of healthy foods sold in these stores by geography, ownership, and store type. Seventy-five Louisiana SNAP-authorized stores were selected for measurement. Between October 2019 and March 2020 (prior to the COVID-19 national emergency declaration), trained researchers used the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores (NEMS-S) to assess the availability, affordability, and quality of healthy versus less healthy foods and beverages in 42 SNAP-authorized stores, including: grocery (n = 12, 29%), convenience (n = 17, 41%), drug (n = 1, 2%), dollar (n = 11, 26%), and butcher/meat (n = 1, 2%). Multivariate analysis of variance (a priori, p < 0.05) determined if differences in total NEMS-S scores or subscores existed by geography (urban versus rural), ownership (corporate/chain versus independent), or store type. No urban/rural differences were identified. Corporate/chain SNAP-authorized stores scored higher on average than independent SNAP-authorized stores for the total NEMS-S score (17.2 versus 8.1; p = 0.009) and availability subscore (13.1 versus 6.1; p = 0.02). SNAP-authorized grocery stores scored higher than all other store types (total NEMS-S score 27.6), followed by SNAP-authorized dollar stores (total NEMS-S score 10.7), and SNAP-authorized convenience stores (total NEMS-S score 5) (p < 0.001). Louisiana Cooperative Extension Services should explore ways to scale healthy food retail strategies statewide with a specific emphasis on independent and smaller SNAP-authorized retailers.

4.
Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior ; 53(7):S75-S76, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1297174

ABSTRACT

The Louisiana Healthy Communities Initiative, led by the LSU AgCenter, guides SNAP-Ed policy, systems, and environmental change efforts. Prior to COVID19, agents held in-person community forums to gather input and community priorities for interventions. COVID19 spurred innovation in this process. Although many states have used videoconferencing services to host meetings, lack of functional internet access posed a barrier for many communities in Louisiana. To gather broad community input through Qualtrics surveys in order to assess needs and assets, guide project prioritization, and gather feedback on previous projects. Qualtrics surveys were distributed via email to community members, stakeholders, and partners serving low-income audiences. Three surveys solicited feedback for existing Healthy Communities coalitions (n = 45);1 survey gathered initial input for a newly formed Healthy Communities coalition (n = 63). The overall response rate across all surveys was 23.6%. Survey responses to community health and engagement questions were separated by counties and analyzed through qualitative content analysis. The research team worked with Extension agents to conduct member checking through discussing survey results with participants. One hundred and eight responses were received from 4 communities. Extension agents reported high satisfaction with the process. Surveys provided action items and potential new coalition members. Across all 4 communities, common themes included acknowledging racial health disparities, a need for greater community involvement in coalition efforts, and a lack of healthy food options. Qualtrics surveys were an effective way to gather community input and allowed wider participation than would have been possible with a virtual meeting. Post-COVID, agents plan to continue to solicit community input through Qualtrics surveys, in addition to face-to-face forums. This method is a valuable tool for lower-income and rural communities. Results reflected an awareness of low community engagement, racial health disparities and limited healthy food access. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Education. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior is the property of Elsevier B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

5.
Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior ; 53(7):S26-S27, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1297161

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study is to evaluate the implementation of a rural farmer's market You SNAP, We Match (YSWM) program during the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2018, the St. Helena Healthy Communities Coalition held a forum to develop strategies to improve community health. Participants identified that a local farmer's market accepting Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits was no longer operational and reopening the market with SNAP would increase food access and improve community health. SNAP recipients in a rural, majority Black parish in Louisiana. The St. Helena Farmer's Market YSWM program launched during the COVID-19 pandemic (July 2020), offering a $3 match for fresh fruit and vegetables for every $1 in SNAP benefits spent at the market. Observational data (customer counts, zip codes, and vendor sales) were collected at the market before and after the implementation of the YSWM program. Prior to implementation, the market averaged 33 customers per day. Five months following implementation, the market averaged 76 customers per day (+131.42%), and a total of $6,6213 SNAP and "match" dollars were reinvested into the local food system. Market reach also expanded. Prior to YSWM implementation, a majority of customers (95%) resided in the same town as the market. Following implementation, 66% of market customers resided in the market town (with 5% coming from over 30 miles away). More than half of SNAP customers reported being first time customers, with 92% reported visiting the market specifically for SNAP. Since implementation, the YSWM program has remained successful while confronting unique challenges. YSWM Program implementation generated an increase in market customers, a wider geographical reach, and increased access to fresh produce for surrounding communities during a public health crisis. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior is the property of Elsevier B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

6.
Current Developments in Nutrition ; 5(Supplement_2):226-226, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1262099
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