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1.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(5): e34480, 2022 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847069

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing homes in the United States were devastated by COVID-19, with 710,000 cases and 138,000 deaths nationally through October 2021. Although facilities are required to have infection control staff, only 3% of designated infection preventionists have taken a basic infection control course prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Most research has focused on infection control in the acute care setting. However, little is known about the implementation of infection control practices and effective interventions in nursing homes. This study utilizes Project ECHO (Extension for Community Health Outcomes), an evidence-based telementoring model, to connect Penn State University subject matter experts with nursing home staff and administrators to proactively support evidence-based infection control guideline implementation. OBJECTIVE: Our study seeks to answer the research question of how evidence-based infection control guidelines can be implemented effectively in nursing homes, including comparing the effectiveness of two ECHO-delivered training interventions on key patient-centered outcomes such as reducing the number of residents with a COVID-19 diagnosis. METHODS: A stratified cluster randomized design was utilized. Using a 1:1 ratio, we randomly assigned 136 nursing homes to ECHO or ECHO Plus arms. Randomization was stratified by geographic location, baseline COVID-19 infection rate, and facility capacity. The study had two phases. In phase one, completed in July 2021, nursing homes in both study arms received a 16-week infectious disease and quality improvement training intervention via real-time, interactive videoconferencing and the ECHO learning model. Phase one sessions were up to 90 minutes in duration. In phase two, completed in November 2021, the ECHO group was offered optional 60-minute office hours for 9 weeks and the ECHO Plus group received 9 weeks of 60-minute sessions on emerging topics and an additional 8-session refresher series on infection control. RESULTS: A total of 290 nursing home facilities were assessed for eligibility, with 136 nursing homes recruited and randomly assigned to ECHO or ECHO Plus. Guided by the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework, we will simultaneously evaluate the study's effectiveness and implementation outcomes at baseline (intervention start date), and at 4, 6, 12, and 18 months. The primary outcome is the COVID-19 infection rate in nursing homes. Secondary outcomes include COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths, flu-like illness, and quality of life. Surveys and interviews with participants will also provide data as to the adoption, implementation, and maintenance of best practices taught throughout ECHO sessions. CONCLUSIONS: A multipronged approach to improving infection control and emergency preparedness in nursing homes is important, given the toll that the COVID-19 pandemic has taken on residents and staff. The ECHO model has significant strengths when compared to traditional training, as it allows for remote learning delivered by a multidisciplinary team of experts, and utilizes case discussions that match the context and capacity of nursing homes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04499391; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04499391.

2.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 16, 2022 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To support the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the World Health Organization and its partners developed an interactive virtual learning initiative through which vaccination stakeholders could receive the latest guidance, ask questions, and share their experiences. This initiative, implemented between 9 February 2021 and 15 June 2021, included virtual engagement between technical experts and participants during a 15-session interactive webinar series as well as web and text-messaging discussions in English and French. METHODS: This article uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze survey data collected following each webinar and a post-series survey conducted after the series had concluded. Participant data were tracked for each session, and feedback surveys were conducted after each session to gauge experience quality and content usability. Chi-square tests were used to compare results across professions (health workers, public health practitioners, and others). RESULTS: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity webinar series reached participants in 179 countries or 93% of the WHO Member States; 75% of participants were from low- and middle-income countries. More than 60% of participants reported using the resources provided during the sessions, and 47% reported sharing these resources with colleagues. More than 79% of participants stated that this initiative significantly improved their confidence in preparing for and rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations; an additional 20% stated that the initiative "somewhat" improved their confidence. In the post-series survey, 70% of participants reported that they will "definitely use" the knowledge derived from this learning series in their work; an additional 20% will "probably use" and 9% would "possibly use" this knowledge in their work. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity learning initiative used a digital model of dynamic, interactive learning at scale. The initiative enhanced WHO's ability to disseminate knowledge, provide normative guidance, and share best practices to COVID-19 vaccination stakeholders in real time. This approach allowed WHO to hear the information needs of stakeholders and respond by developing guidance, tools, and training to support COVID-19 vaccine introduction. WHO and its partners can learn from this capacity-building experience and apply best practices for digital interactive learning to other health programs moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Simulation Training , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291538

ABSTRACT

Background: To support the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the World Health Organization and its partners developed an interactive virtual learning initiative through which vaccination stakeholders could receive the latest guidance, ask questions, and share their experiences. This initiative, implemented between 9 February 2021 and 15 June 2021, included virtual engagement between technical experts and participants during a 15-session interactive webinar series as well as web and SMS-messaging discussions in English and French. Methods This article uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze survey data collected following each webinar and a post-series survey conducted after the series had concluded. Participant data was tracked for each session and feedback surveys were conducted after each session to gauge experience quality and content usability. Chi-square tests were used to compare results across professions (health workers, public health practitioners, and other). Results The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity webinar series reached participants in 181 countries or 93% of the WHO Member States;78% of participants were from low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). More than 60% of participants reported using the resources provided during the sessions and 47% reported sharing these resources with colleagues. More than 79% of participants stated that this initiative significantly improved their confidence in preparing for and rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations;an additional 20.3% stated that the initiative “somewhat” improved their confidence. In the post-series survey, 70% of participants reported that they will “definitely use” the knowledge derived from this learning series in their work;an additional 19.7% will “probably use” and 8.6% would “possibly use” this knowledge in their work. Conclusion The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity learning initiative used a digital model of dynamic, interactive learning at scale. The initiative enhanced the WHO’s ability to disseminate knowledge, normative guidance, and best practices to COVID-19 vaccination stakeholders in real-time. This approach allowed the WHO to hear the information needs of stakeholders and respond by developing guidance, tools, and trainings to support COVID-19 vaccine introduction. The WHO and its partners can learn from this capacity-building experience and apply best practices for digital interactive learning to other health programmes moving forward.

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