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1.
EXCLI J ; 21: 93-103, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667813

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to investigate the COVID-19 vaccination acceptance rate and its determinants among healthcare workers in a multicenter study. This was a cross-sectional multi-center survey conducted from February 5 to April 29, 2021. The questionnaire consisted of 26 items in 6 subscales. The English version of the questionnaire was translated into seven languages and distributed through Google Forms using snowball sampling; a colleague in each country was responsible for the forward and backward translation, and also the distribution of the questionnaire. A forward stepwise logistic regression was utilized to explore the variables and questionnaire factors tied to the intention to COVID-19 vaccination. 4630 participants from 91 countries completed the questionnaire. According to the United Nations Development Program 2020, 43.6 % of participants were from low Human Development Index (HDI) regions, 48.3 % high and very high, and 8.1 % from medium. The overall vaccination hesitancy rate was 37 %. Three out of six factors of the questionnaire were significantly related to intention to the vaccination. While 'Perceived benefits of the COVID-19 vaccination' (OR: 3.82, p-value<0.001) and 'Prosocial norms' (OR: 5.18, p-value<0.001) were associated with vaccination acceptance, 'The vaccine safety/cost concerns' with OR: 3.52, p-value<0.001 was tied to vaccination hesitancy. Medical doctors and pharmacists were more willing to take the vaccine in comparison to others. Importantly, HDI with OR: 12.28, 95 % CI: 6.10-24.72 was a strong positive determinant of COVID-19 vaccination acceptance. This study highlighted the vaccination hesitancy rate of 37 % in our sample among HCWs. Increasing awareness regarding vaccination benefits, confronting the misinformation, and strengthening the prosocial norms would be the primary domains for maximizing the vaccination coverage. The study also showed that the HDI is strongly associated with the vaccination acceptance/hesitancy, in a way that those living in low HDI contexts are more hesitant to receive the vaccine.

2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5555316, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156025

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is one of the challenging clinical problems not only in its diagnosis and treatment but also its concurring mental impact. This study is aimed at determining the association between psychological factors, including emotional stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep pattern among BMS patients. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 19 patients with idiopathic BMS were enrolled along with a control group equivalent in age and sex, but without BMS. Questionnaires used were the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Demographic information was also recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation among the two groups of BMS and non-BMS patients regarding stress, depression, and sleep disorder. The average severity of the burning score was 8.31 among the patients. Furthermore, a significant correlation was observed among mental disorders and educational level and sex, but not with age. There was also no significant correlation among the severity of the burning score with sex, education, and mental disorder. CONCLUSION: BMS is significantly associated with psychological symptoms. This condition requires proper treatment and support because it can represent psychological or mental issues and/or have a significant effect on daily life.


Subject(s)
Burning Mouth Syndrome , Depression , Pain Measurement , Psychological Distress , Sleep Wake Disorders , Surveys and Questionnaires , Burning Mouth Syndrome/etiology , Burning Mouth Syndrome/physiopathology , Depression/complications , Depression/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/physiopathology
3.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 26(1): 33, 2021 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: School closure is one of the main policies of global health care strategies performed worldwide. Despite all benefits, there might be some threats for younger groups spending their time in quarantine. This study aims to determine the impacts of lockdown and school closure on children's major lifestyle aspects, especially their leisure and sleep pattern during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: For the purpose of this study, an online questionnaire was distributed from 14th to 31st of March 2020 among the schools and students from the first grade to the 12th grade (before university) in Fars province, southern Iran. The questionnaire consisted of five sections which included data regarding the students' general information, activity priorities, adherence to quarantine, attitude toward school closure, and sleep patterns. RESULTS: In our study, 20,697 filled questionnaires were received from the participants with an average age of 13.76 years; 29.7% of them were male, 80.6% were from urban areas, and 83.3% were from public schools. The overall first preference of students during school closure was mobile and computer games (30.1%), followed by studying (26.6%) and watching television (13.8%). Our results demonstrated that the majority of students adhered to social distancing and there was also a significant correlation among education levels and desire for schools to be closed till the end of the semester (P = 0.015). Also, regarding sleep patterns, the majority (53.5%) had above 12 h of sleep throughout the day. CONCLUSION: It seems that lockdown following COVID-19 pandemic has changed various aspects of the students' lifestyle remarkably, especially by increasing screen time and even sleep duration and pattern. We believe that certain strategies should be implemented by the Health and Educational Ministry to control not only the visible side effects of the quarantine period, but also the collateral consequences on their psychological and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Schools , Sleep Hygiene , Students/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Life Style , Male , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 427, 2020 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-603848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the WHO declared the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak a global pandemic. Although the number of infected cases is increasing, information about its clinical characteristics in the Middle East, especially in Iran, a country which is considered to be one of the most important focal points of the disease in the world, is lacking. To date, there is no available literature on the clinical data on COVID-19 patients in Iran. METHODS: In this multicenter retrospective study, 113 hospitalized confirmed cases of COVID-19 admitted to university affiliated hospitals in Shiraz, Iran from February 20 to March 20 were entered in the study. RESULTS: The mean age was 53.75 years and 71 (62.8%) were males. The most common symptoms at onset were fatigue (75: 66.4%), cough (73: 64.6%), and fever (67: 59.3%). Laboratory data revealed significant correlation between lymphocyte count (P value = 0.003), partial thromboplastin time (P value = 0.000), international normalized ratio (P value = 0.000) with the severity of the disease. The most common abnormality in chest CT scans was ground-glass opacity (77: 93.9%), followed by consolidation (48: 58.5%). Our results revealed an overall 8% (9 out of 113 cases) mortality rate among patients, in which the majority was among patients admitted to the ICU (5: 55.6%). CONCLUSION: Evaluating the clinical data of COVID-19 patients and finding the source of infection and studying the behavior of the disease is crucial for understanding the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
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