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1.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; : 1-4, 2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747311

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) delta variant is highly transmissible, and current vaccines may have reduced effectiveness in preventing symptomatic infection. Using epidemiological and genomic analyses, we investigated an outbreak of the variant in an acute-care setting among partially and fully vaccinated individuals. Effective outbreak control was achieved using standard measures.

2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(6): 1085-1088, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699692

ABSTRACT

In a P.1 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in a long-term care home, vaccine effectiveness against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection was 52.5% (95% confidence interval: 26.9%-69.1%) in residents and 66.2% (2.3%-88.3%) in staff. Vaccine effectiveness against severe illness was 78.6% (47.9%-91.2%) in residents. Two of 19 vaccinated resident case patients died. Outbreak management required both vaccination and infection control measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Long-Term Care , Ontario/epidemiology , Vaccination
3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e3981-e3982, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573984

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E1175-E1180, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575909

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reliable reports on hand hygiene performance throughout the COVID-19 pandemic are lacking as most hospitals continue to rely on direct observation to measure this quality indicator. Using group electronic hand hygiene monitoring, we sought to assess the impact of COVID-19 on adherence to hand hygiene. METHODS: Across 12 Ontario hospitals (5 university and 7 community teaching hospitals), a group electronic hand hygiene monitoring system was installed before the pandemic to provide continuous measurement of hand hygiene adherence across 978 ward and 367 critical care beds. We performed an interrupted time-series study of institutional hand hygiene adherence in association with a COVID-19 inpatient census and the Ontario daily count of COVID-19 cases during a baseline period (Nov. 1, 2019, to Feb. 29, 2020), the pre-peak period of the first wave of the pandemic (Mar. 1 to Apr. 24, 2020), and the post-peak period of the first wave (Apr. 25 to July 5, 2020). We used a Poisson regression model to assess the association between the hospital COVID-19 census and institutional hand hygiene adherence while adjusting for the correlation within inpatient units. RESULTS: At baseline, the rate of hand hygiene adherence was 46.0% (6 325 401 of 13 750 968 opportunities) and this improved beginning in March 2020 to a daily peak of 79.3% (66 640 of 84 026 opportunities) on Mar. 30, 2020. Each patient admitted with COVID-19 was associated with improved hand hygiene adherence (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.0621, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0619-1.0623). Increasing Ontario daily case count was similarly associated with improved hand hygiene (IRR 1.0026, 95% CI 1.0021-1.0032). After peak COVID-19 community and inpatient numbers, hand hygiene adherence declined and returned to baseline. INTERPRETATION: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with significant improvement in hand hygiene adherence, measured using a group electronic monitoring system. Future research should seek to determine whether strategies that focus on health care worker perception of personal risk can achieve sustainable improvements in hand hygiene performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hand Hygiene , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Hand Hygiene/methods , Health Impact Assessment , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Public Health Surveillance
6.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S311-S312, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1565005

ABSTRACT

Background Hand hygiene (HH) is a standard infection prevention and control precaution to be applied in healthcare settings to prevent transmission of COVID-19. Many healthcare institutions observed significant improvements in HH performance during wave one of the COVID-19 pandemic but the sustainability of this change is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate long-term HH performance throughout subsequent waves of the pandemic across acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Methods HH adherence was measured using a previously validated group electronic monitoring system which was installed on all alcohol handrub and sink soap dispensers inside and outside each patient room across 56 inpatient units (35 wards and 21 critical care units) spanning 13 acute care hospitals (6 university and 7 community teaching hospitals) from 1 November 2019 to 31 May 2021. Daily HH adherence was compared with daily COVID-19 case count across Ontario. During this period, weekly performance continued to be reported to units but unit-based quality improvement discussions were inconsistent due to the COVID-19 response. Results Figure 1 depicts daily aggregate HH adherence plotted against the new daily COVID-19 case count across Ontario. An elevation in HH adherence was seen prior to the start of the first wave, rising almost to 80% and then remained above 70% for the peak of wave one. During waves two and three, peak COVID-19 case counts were associated with a maximum HH adherence of 51%, only marginally above the pre-pandemic baseline. After the end of wave one (from 1 July 2020 to 31 May 2021) the median HH performance was only 49% (interquartile range 47%-50%). Figure 1. Hand hygiene adherence across 13 acute care hospitals in comparison to overall new daily COVID-19 cases in Ontario Conclusion Initial improvements in HH adherence preceding the start of the COVID-19 pandemic were not sustained, possibly due to increasing comfort and reduced anxiety associated with providing care to COVID-19 patients leading to a perception of reduced COVID-19 transmission risk. These findings highlight the need for HH monitoring to be tied to longitudinal unit-led quality improvement in order to achieve durable changes in practice. Disclosures Susy S. Hota, MSc MD FRCPC, Finch Therapeutics (Research Grant or Support) Susy S. Hota, MSc MD FRCPC, Finch Therapeutics (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Grant/Research Support

7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(6): 1085-1088, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303897

ABSTRACT

In a P.1 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in a long-term care home, vaccine effectiveness against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection was 52.5% (95% confidence interval: 26.9%-69.1%) in residents and 66.2% (2.3%-88.3%) in staff. Vaccine effectiveness against severe illness was 78.6% (47.9%-91.2%) in residents. Two of 19 vaccinated resident case patients died. Outbreak management required both vaccination and infection control measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Long-Term Care , Ontario/epidemiology , Vaccination
8.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 188(3): 825-826, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279468

ABSTRACT

There have been recent reports in the breast imaging literature of unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy following COVID-19 vaccination. It is unclear whether the reactive lymphadenopathy may impact the sentinel lymph node biopsy procedure. In this article, we provide guidelines regarding the timing of the COVID-19 vaccine and breast cancer surgery which were formulated after a review of the available literature and in consultation with infectious disease specialists.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Axilla , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Lymph Node Excision , Lymph Nodes , SARS-CoV-2 , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy , Vaccination/adverse effects
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