Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Chin J Integr Med ; 28(1): 3-11, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588738

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, is a major public health issue. The epidemic is unlikely to be contained until the global launch of safe and effective vaccines that could prevent serious illnesses and provide herd immunity. Although most patients have mild flu-like symptoms, some develop severe illnesses accompanied by multiple organ dysfunction. The identification of pathophysiology and early warning biomarkers of a severe type of COVID-19 contribute to the treatment and prevention of serious complications. Here, we review the pathophysiology, early warning indicators, and effective treatment of Chinese and Western Medicine for patients with a severe type of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Brief Bioinform ; 23(1)2022 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434365

ABSTRACT

MOTIVATION: The Estimation of Model Accuracy problem is a cornerstone problem in the field of Bioinformatics. As of CASP14, there are 79 global QA methods, and a minority of 39 residue-level QA methods with very few of them working on protein complexes. Here, we introduce ZoomQA, a novel, single-model method for assessing the accuracy of a tertiary protein structure/complex prediction at residue level, which have many applications such as drug discovery. ZoomQA differs from others by considering the change in chemical and physical features of a fragment structure (a portion of a protein within a radius $r$ of the target amino acid) as the radius of contact increases. Fourteen physical and chemical properties of amino acids are used to build a comprehensive representation of every residue within a protein and grade their placement within the protein as a whole. Moreover, we have shown the potential of ZoomQA to identify problematic regions of the SARS-CoV-2 protein complex. RESULTS: We benchmark ZoomQA on CASP14, and it outperforms other state-of-the-art local QA methods and rivals state of the art QA methods in global prediction metrics. Our experiment shows the efficacy of these new features and shows that our method is able to match the performance of other state-of-the-art methods without the use of homology searching against databases or PSSM matrices. AVAILABILITY: http://zoomQA.renzhitech.com.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caspases/chemistry , Machine Learning , Models, Molecular , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Humans , Protein Structure, Quaternary , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Sequence Analysis, Protein
3.
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16071, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349689

ABSTRACT

To speed up the discovery of COVID-19 disease mechanisms by X-ray images, this research developed a new diagnosis platform using a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) that is able to assist radiologists with diagnosis by distinguishing COVID-19 pneumonia from non-COVID-19 pneumonia in patients based on chest X-ray classification and analysis. Such a tool can save time in interpreting chest X-rays and increase the accuracy and thereby enhance our medical capacity for the detection and diagnosis of COVID-19. The explainable method is also used in the DCNN to select instances of the X-ray dataset images to explain the behavior of training-learning models to achieve higher prediction accuracy. The average accuracy of our method is above 96%, which can replace manual reading and has the potential to be applied to large-scale rapid screening of COVID-9 for widely use cases.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/prevention & control , Deep Learning , Neural Networks, Computer , Pneumonia/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Pneumonia/complications , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sensitivity and Specificity , X-Rays
5.
Arch Virol ; 166(8): 2071-2087, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163058

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), has affected more than 50 million patients worldwide and caused a global public health emergency. Therefore, there is a recognized need to identify risk factors for COVID-19 severity and mortality. A systematic search of electronic databases (PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library) for studies published before September 29, 2020, was performed. Studies that investigated risk factors for progression and mortality in COVID-19 patients were included. A total 344,431 participants from 34 studies were included in this meta-analysis. Regarding comorbidities, cerebrovascular disease (CVD), chronic kidney disease (CKD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and malignancy were associated with an increased risk of progression and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Regarding clinical manifestations, sputum production was associated with a dramatically increased risk of progression and mortality. Hemoptysis was a risk factor for death in COVID-19 patients. In laboratory examinations, increased neutrophil count, decreased lymphocyte count, decreased platelet count, increased C-reactive protein (CRP), coinfection with bacteria or fungi, increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK), increased N-terminal pronatriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and bilateral pneumonia in CT/X-ray were significantly more frequent in the severe group compared with the non-severe group. Moreover, the proportion of patients with increased CRP and total bilirubin (TBIL) was also significantly higher in the deceased group than in the survival group. CVD, CKD, sputum production, increased neutrophil count, decreased lymphocyte count, decreased platelet count, increased CRP, coinfection with bacteria or fungi, increased ALT and CK, increased NT-proBNP, and bilateral pneumonia in CT/X-ray were associated with an increased risk of progression in COVID-19 patients. Moreover, the proportion of patients with increased sputum production, hemoptysis, CRP and TBIL was also significantly higher in the deceased group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Disease Progression , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Front Psychol ; 11: 577942, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045506

ABSTRACT

Prior research has demonstrated that the adverse consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may go beyond its economic hardships and physical health concerns, having a significant influence on psychological distress for individuals under quarantine. Nevertheless, relatively little attention has been paid to exploring the risk and protective factors in the link between COVID-19 infection risk and psychological distress among young adults. Following a socioecological framework, the current study examines the moderating role of grit (perseverance and consistency) and social support in the association between COVID-19 infection risk and depressive symptoms. A sample of 1,251 young adults under home quarantine (62.6% female; M age = 20.92 years, SD = 1.47; age ranged from 18 to 25 years) was involved in this study, and they were asked to complete a set of self-reported questionnaires online. Results of a linear regression analysis exhibited that COVID-19 infection risk was positively associated with depressive symptoms in young adults in quarantine. Moreover, moderation analyses showed that this association was moderated by perseverance and social support. To be specific, for those reporting higher levels of social support, this linkage was not significantly positive; in contrast, for those reporting lower levels of social support, perseverance was a significant protective factor for depressive symptoms when young adults were exposed to a high infection risk of COVID-19. The current study suggests that greater social support is essential to helping young adults deal with possible negative emotions in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, university-based counseling services should pay specific attention to those young adults with relatively insufficient social support resources and low levels of perseverance.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL