Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 Apr 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809899

ABSTRACT

This study examined the difficulty encountered by caregivers of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in managing children's smartphone use during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the caregiver- and children-related factors that influence this difficulty. In total, 252 caregivers of children with ADHD were recruited into this study. The caregivers completed a research questionnaire to provide data regarding the difficulty they encountered in managing the smartphone use of children during the COVID-19 pandemic, their general mental health and parenting styles, and the ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms of the children they are caring for. The results indicated that almost 45% of the caregivers of children with ADHD sometimes or often found it difficult to manage the smartphone use of children with ADHD during the COVID-19 pandemic. For the caregivers, a short duration of education, poor general mental health, unaffectionate/uncaring and overprotective parenting styles, older children, and inattention and ODD symptoms were significantly associated with increased difficulty in managing their children's smartphone use during the COVID-19 pandemic. On the basis of the relevant factors identified in this study, an intervention should be developed to enhance the skills of caregivers of children with ADHD with respect to the management of children's smartphone use during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/epidemiology , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/psychology , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parenting , Smartphone
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409601

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has thrown out a challenge to caregivers of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study examined the factors related to the poor general mental health state of the caregivers of children with ADHD during the COVID-19 pandemic, including (1) difficulties of caregivers in asking their child to adopt protective behaviors against COVID-19, (2) difficulties of caregivers in managing the child's daily performance, and (3) worsened psychological symptoms in children. In total, 161 caregivers completed an online questionnaire to provide data regarding their general mental health state and difficulties in asking their child with ADHD to adopt protective behaviors against COVID-19 and in managing the child's after-school learning, sleep routine, and internet use, as well as worsened psychological symptoms. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that caregivers' difficulties in managing ADHD children's self-protective behaviors and after-school learning and the children's worsened emotional symptoms were significantly associated with poor caregiver general mental health state. An intervention that enhances the mental health of caregivers of children with ADHD during the COVID-19 pandemic by addressing their difficulties in managing the children's behaviors and psychological problems is warranted.


Subject(s)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity , COVID-19 , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(9)2021 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390811

ABSTRACT

The aims of this study were to examine the proportion of caregivers who were hesitant to vaccinate their children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the factors related to caregiver intentions to vaccinate their children against COVID-19. In total, 161 caregivers of children with ADHD were recruited in this study. The caregivers completed an online questionnaire to provide data regarding their intention to vaccinate their children against COVID-19, concerns about the effectiveness and safety of vaccines, unfavorable family attitudes toward vaccines, and children's medication use for ADHD and comorbid psychopathology. The factors related to caregiver intentions to vaccinate their child were examined using linear regression analysis. The results indicated that 25.5% of caregivers were hesitant to vaccinate their children with ADHD, and 11.8% refused to vaccinate their children against COVID-19. The caregivers' concerns about the safety of vaccines and children's regular use of medication for ADHD were negatively associated with caregiver intentions to vaccinate, whereas the children's comorbid conduct or oppositional defiant problems were positively associated with the caregiver intentions to vaccinate. An intervention that enhances caregiver intentions to vaccinate their children with ADHD against COVID-19 by addressing the related factors found in this study is warranted.

5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266725

ABSTRACT

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are commonly affected by medical illness. The aim of the present study was to explore the risks of contracting respiratory infectious diseases (RIDs), including upper and lower RIDs and influenza, in children with ADHD. We also examined whether methylphenidate has a protective effect regarding the risk of contracting RIDs among children with ADHD who have a history of methylphenidate treatment. Children in the Taiwan Maternal and Child Health Database from 2004 to 2016 were included in the present study. Upper and lower RIDs, influenza, ADHD, age, sex, and records of methylphenidate prescription were identified. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the significance of the risk of RIDs among children with ADHD in comparison with that among children without ADHD after adjustment for sex and age. The self-controlled case series analysis was conducted to examine the protective effect of methylphenidate treatment against RIDs. In total, 85,853 children with ADHD and 1,458,750 children without ADHD were included in the study. After controlling for sociodemographic variables, we observed that children with ADHD had significantly higher risks of upper RIDs, lower RIDs, and influenza infection than did those without ADHD. Among the children with ADHD who had a history of methylphenidate treatment, the risk of contracting RIDs was lower during the methylphenidate treatment period than during the nontreatment period. Children with ADHD had a higher RID risk than those without ADHD. Methylphenidate might reduce the risk of RIDs among children with ADHD who have a history of methylphenidate treatment.


Subject(s)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity , Central Nervous System Stimulants , Communicable Diseases , Methylphenidate , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/drug therapy , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/epidemiology , Central Nervous System Stimulants/therapeutic use , Child , Cohort Studies , Humans , Methylphenidate/therapeutic use , Taiwan/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL