Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
25th International Computer Symposium on New Trends in Computer Technologies and Applications, ICS 2022 ; 1723 CCIS:493-500, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2263344

ABSTRACT

As epidemics such as COVID-19 and monkeypox spread, tracing specific people with restricted activities (targets) within administrative areas (targeted areas) is an effective option to slow the spread. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) that can provide autonomous geospatial positioning of targets can assist this issue. K-nearest neighbors (KNN) is one of the most widely used algorithms for various classifications or predictions. In this paper, we will use the technique of KNN to classify the areas of the targets and explore the relationship between the density of targets to a area and the accuracy of classifications. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

2.
Online Information Review ; 47(1):59-80, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2245635

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Coronavirus disease 2019-related fake news consistently appears on social media. This study uses appraisal theory to analyze the impact of such rumors on individuals' emotions, motivations, and intentions to share fake news. Furthermore, the concept of psychological distance and construal level theory are used in combination with appraisal theory to compare toilet paper shortages and celebrity scandal rumors. Design/methodology/approach: Data collected from 299 Taiwanese respondents to 150 toilet paper shortage-related and 149 celebrity gossip-related questionnaires were processed using partial least squares regression and multigroup analysis. Findings: In both cases, surprise is felt most intensely. However, unlike in the celebrity fake news scenario, worry plays a prominent role in driving the altruistic sharing motivation related to the toilet paper shortage rumor. Furthermore, while emotional attributes (basic or self-conscious, concrete, or ) serve as a guide for how emotions change with psychological distance, the degree to which an emotion is relevant to the fake news context is key to its manifestation. Originality/value: This study examines the impact of individuals' emotions on their motivations and intention to share fake news, applying the appraisal theory and the psychological distance concept in a single study to fake news sharing intention. It evaluates the relationship between psychological distance and emotions, revealing that it is not absolute and need not necessarily shift according to psychological distance change;rather, the relationship is context-sensitive. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

3.
Int J Rheum Dis ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2161502

ABSTRACT

A female 17-year-old diagnosed with seronegative spondyloarthritis (SpA) following the first jab of the BioNTech162b2 (BNT162b2) vaccine presented with recurrent swelling and painful knee accompanied by posterior heel tenderness over the past 1.5 months. Laboratory investigations revealed elevated serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Synovial aspiration yielded level 3 crystal-free, aseptic and inflammatory effusion. She tested positive for the human leukocyte antigen-B27 and was diagnosed with peripheral SpA. She received daily celecoxib (400 mg), methylprednisolone (8 mg), and sulfasalazine (2 g), but the effect was limited. Nonetheless, her symptoms improved significantly with weekly subcutaneous etanercept administration (50 mg). Four weeks later, her arthritis was completely resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of newly diagnosed seronegative peripheral SpA in an autoimmunity-disease-free individual following messenger RNA BNT coronavirus disease 2019 vaccination.

7.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 40(16), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009530

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with cancer have worse outcomes from COVID-19 infection. However, the specific impact of COVID-19 on patients with (HNC) is largely unknown. The COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) maintains an international registry (NCT04354701) aimed to investigate the clinical course and complications of COVID-19 in patients with cancer. Here, we report severity of COVID-19 and its complications among HNC patients. Methods: The CCC19 registry was queried for patients with HNC and laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. The co-primary outcomes were severity of COVID-19 illness on an ordinal scale (0: no complications;1: hospitalized, no oxygen (O2);2: hospitalized, required O2;3: ICU admission;4: mechanical ventilation (MV);5: death), and severity of complications (mild, moderate, serious). The outcomes were further stratified by demographics, recent treatment (systemic vs local;surgery, radiation (RT) vs systemic), treatment intent (palliative vs curative), and cancer status (remission, responding, stable, progressing). Results: From March 2020 to December 2021, 356 HNC patients were identified. Median age was 65 (interquartile range 58-74), 29% were female, 56% were white, 67% were former or current smokers, 20% had a BMI >30, 15% had an ECOG performance status >2, and 57% had >2 comorbidities. 154 (43%) had no complications, 61 (17%) were hospitalized without O2, 135 (38%) were hospitalized with O2, 50 (14%) required ICU, 32 (9%) required MV, and 74 (21%) died. 88 (25%) had mild, 59 (17%) had moderate, and 132 (37%) had serious complications. 33% of patients who received systemic therapy and 30% who received RT within 3 mo prior to COVID-19 diagnosis died. Mortality was higher in patients receiving palliative when compared to curative intent treatment (44% vs 16%). In addition, 50% of patients with actively progressing cancer, and 45% who had serious complications died. Importantly, 37 (n=12 palliative systemic therapy and n=25 local therapy) patients had a treatment delay due to COVID-19 diagnosis. Conclusions: Our study is the largest cohort to date describing COVID-19 outcomes in HNC patients and suggest a high rate of mortality even in those receiving local and curative intent treatment. Variables stratified by COVID-19 severity. Note: Ordinal levels 3 and 4 not shown due to small case numbers.

8.
Online Information Review ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1806865

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Coronavirus disease 2019-related fake news consistently appears on social media. This study uses appraisal theory to analyze the impact of such rumors on individuals' emotions, motivations, and intentions to share fake news. Furthermore, the concept of psychological distance and construal level theory are used in combination with appraisal theory to compare toilet paper shortages and celebrity scandal rumors. Design/methodology/approach: Data collected from 299 Taiwanese respondents to 150 toilet paper shortage-related and 149 celebrity gossip-related questionnaires were processed using partial least squares regression and multigroup analysis. Findings: In both cases, surprise is felt most intensely. However, unlike in the celebrity fake news scenario, worry plays a prominent role in driving the altruistic sharing motivation related to the toilet paper shortage rumor. Furthermore, while emotional attributes (basic or self-conscious, concrete, or ) serve as a guide for how emotions change with psychological distance, the degree to which an emotion is relevant to the fake news context is key to its manifestation. Originality/value: This study examines the impact of individuals' emotions on their motivations and intention to share fake news, applying the appraisal theory and the psychological distance concept in a single study to fake news sharing intention. It evaluates the relationship between psychological distance and emotions, revealing that it is not absolute and need not necessarily shift according to psychological distance change;rather, the relationship is context-sensitive. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

9.
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems ; 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1759438

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has led to large-scale lifestyle changes and increased social isolation and stress on a societal level. This has had a unique impact on US "essential workers" (EWs) - who continue working outside their homes to provide critical services, such as hospital and infrastructure employees. We examine the use of Twitter by EWs as a step toward understanding the pandemic's impact on their mental well-being, as compared to the population as a whole. We found that EWs authored a higher ratio of mental health related tweets during the pandemic than the average user, but authored fewer tweets with Covid related keywords than average users. Despite this, sentiment analysis showed that, on average, EWs' tweets yield a more positive sentiment score than average Twitter users, both before and during the pandemic. Based on these initial insights, we highlight our future aims to investigate individual differences in this impact to EWs.

10.
Ann Oncol ; 33(3): 340-346, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588323

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccination is an important preventive health measure to protect against symptomatic and severe COVID-19. Impaired immunity secondary to an underlying malignancy or recent receipt of antineoplastic systemic therapies can result in less robust antibody titers following vaccination and possible risk of breakthrough infection. As clinical trials evaluating COVID-19 vaccines largely excluded patients with a history of cancer and those on active immunosuppression (including chemotherapy), limited evidence is available to inform the clinical efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination across the spectrum of patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We describe the clinical features of patients with cancer who developed symptomatic COVID-19 following vaccination and compare weighted outcomes with those of contemporary unvaccinated patients, after adjustment for confounders, using data from the multi-institutional COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19). RESULTS: Patients with cancer who develop COVID-19 following vaccination have substantial comorbidities and can present with severe and even lethal infection. Patients harboring hematologic malignancies are over-represented among vaccinated patients with cancer who develop symptomatic COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination against COVID-19 remains an essential strategy in protecting vulnerable populations, including patients with cancer. Patients with cancer who develop breakthrough infection despite full vaccination, however, remain at risk of severe outcomes. A multilayered public health mitigation approach that includes vaccination of close contacts, boosters, social distancing, and mask-wearing should be continued for the foreseeable future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
11.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339268

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients (pts) with cancer have a high risk of venous thromboembolic (VTE) complications, further enhanced by anti-cancer treatments, specifically hormonal therapies, targeted therapies (VEGF inhibitors, other TKIs) and immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs). We hypothesized that high-risk therapies would predispose pts with cancer and COVID-19 to higher risk of VTE complications. Methods: CCC19 is the largest international registry (NCT04354701) recording outcomes of pts with cancer and COVID-19. The registry was queried for hospitalized pts who developed VTE and received systemic cancer treatment in the year prior to COVID-19. Incidence of VTE was analyzed as the primary endpoint;30-day any cause mortality & need for ICU admission at baseline were secondary endpoints in pts with and without VTE respectively. Pts were stratified by treatment type and time from last treatment dose: <2 wk, 2-4 wk, 1-3 months (mos), 3-12 mos. Results: As of February 9th 2021, 4217 hospitalized pts with complications data were present in the registry. 1867 (44%) pts had received systemic anti-cancer therapy within the year prior to COVID-19 and were analyzed. There were a total of 186 (10%) VTE events. Of these, VTE incidence was 141 (10.5%) in pts with solid tumors and 57 (9%) in pts with hematologic malignancies. Overall 30-day mortality was 20% and 22% in pts with and without VTE respectively, while direct admission to ICU at presentation was seen in 17% and 10% of pts with and without VTE, respectively. Treatment timing and drug exposures are below (Table). Receipt of systemic anti-cancer treatment within 3 mos vs 3-12 mos was associated with increased rate of VTE, OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.18-5.84, p=0.011 (univariate Fisher test). Conclusions: We describe the incidence of VTE events in pts with cancer and COVID-19 with recent systemic cancer therapy. ICI and VEGFi were associated with numerically higher rates of VTE;other examined drugs and drug classes were not. Timing of therapy appears to modify risk of VTE. Although retrospective, with possible selection and confounding biases, our analysis suggests that factors other than anticancer drug exposures may drive VTE events in this population.

12.
Ann Oncol ; 32(6): 787-800, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer may be at high risk of adverse outcomes from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. We analyzed a cohort of patients with cancer and coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) reported to the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) to identify prognostic clinical factors, including laboratory measurements and anticancer therapies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with active or historical cancer and a laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis recorded between 17 March and 18 November 2020 were included. The primary outcome was COVID-19 severity measured on an ordinal scale (uncomplicated, hospitalized, admitted to intensive care unit, mechanically ventilated, died within 30 days). Multivariable regression models included demographics, cancer status, anticancer therapy and timing, COVID-19-directed therapies, and laboratory measurements (among hospitalized patients). RESULTS: A total of 4966 patients were included (median age 66 years, 51% female, 50% non-Hispanic white); 2872 (58%) were hospitalized and 695 (14%) died; 61% had cancer that was present, diagnosed, or treated within the year prior to COVID-19 diagnosis. Older age, male sex, obesity, cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, renal disease, diabetes mellitus, non-Hispanic black race, Hispanic ethnicity, worse Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, recent cytotoxic chemotherapy, and hematologic malignancy were associated with higher COVID-19 severity. Among hospitalized patients, low or high absolute lymphocyte count; high absolute neutrophil count; low platelet count; abnormal creatinine; troponin; lactate dehydrogenase; and C-reactive protein were associated with higher COVID-19 severity. Patients diagnosed early in the COVID-19 pandemic (January-April 2020) had worse outcomes than those diagnosed later. Specific anticancer therapies (e.g. R-CHOP, platinum combined with etoposide, and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors) were associated with high 30-day all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical factors (e.g. older age, hematological malignancy, recent chemotherapy) and laboratory measurements were associated with poor outcomes among patients with cancer and COVID-19. Although further studies are needed, caution may be required in utilizing particular anticancer therapies. CLINICAL TRIAL IDENTIFIER: NCT04354701.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Hepatology ; 72(1 SUPPL):275A, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-986097

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic with significant morbidity and mortality. Possible association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and worse COVID-19 disease progression has been suggested but not well described in the United States We investigated whether COVID-19 was associated with elevations in liver enzymes or hepatic decompensation in patients with underlying hepatic steatosis Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of consecutive adults treated at the University of Michigan for COVID-19 between March 1 and April 30, 2020. Hepatic steatosis was defined based on imaging >30 days prior to COVID-19 diagnosis. Outcomes were: (1) peak ALT or bilirubin following COVID-19 diagnosis, (2) ALT >2 or 5 times upper limit of normal (ULN), defined as the higher of baseline ALT or 19 U/L in women and 30 U/L in men, and (3) jaundice defined as bilirubin >2 or 4 mg/dl We conducted regressions with the above outcomes as dependent variables and hepatic steatosis as the primary predictor These regression models were logistic for outcomes of abnormal ALT or bilirubin and linear for maximal ALT or bilirubin Results: Evidence of steatosis on prior imaging was found in 80/159 (50 3%) patients Overall, 89% of patients were hospitalized, 51% were admitted to intensive care unit, and 16% died Chronic liver disease other than NAFLD was found in 14% of patients, 5% had cirrhosis, and 2 7% had prior liver decompensation with ascites, variceal bleeding, or hepatic encephalopathy Patients with steatosis were younger, more often African-American with higher body mass index than those without steatosis Baseline ALT and total bilirubin were higher in the steatosis group Hepatic steatosis was associated with higher incidence of ALT >2x ULN (OR 2.93 [1.23-6.97]) or >5x ULN (OR 6.21 [1.45-26.62]), and with peak ALT (beta 39 7 [7 85-71 49]) Hepatic steatosis was not associated with increased bilirubin Rates of liver decompensation were very low: 1 3% and 2 5%, respectively, with no difference based on NAFLD status (p > 0.4 for both) (Table 1) Conclusion: Analysis from our cohort showed that NALFD is associated with acute hepatocellular injury in patients with COVID-19 Strengths of this study include granularity of data available for review Weaknesses include the observational and single-center nature of the study Larger scale multi-center studies are needed to corroborate these findings.(Table Presented).

17.
Hepatology ; 72(1 SUPPL):276A, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-986091

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic with significant morbidity and mortality. Possible association between hepatic steatosis (HS) and worse COVID-19 disease progression has been suggested but not well described in the United States We investigated whether patients with HS experienced worse disease outcomes from COVID-19 infection than those without Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a cohort of 342 consecutive adult patients treated at the University of Michigan for COVID-19 between March 1 and April 30, 2020. HS was defined as either prior imaging evidence of steatosis or hepatic steatosis index >36 for Asians or >39 for non-Asians. The primary outcome was disease severity based on admission to intensive care unit (ICU), intubation, death, or the World Health Organization (WHO) ordinal scale We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the predictors of ICU admission, intubation rate, or death and multivariable linear regression for disease severity on WHO ordinal scale HS was the primary predictor Results: A total of 342 patients were analyzed Median age was 63 years;53 5% of patients were male and 44 4% Black, 52 6% required ICU admission, 34 2% required intubation, and 16% died A 178 patients (52%) had HS, who were younger (58 5 vs 66 5 years;p < 0 001), had higher body mass index (34 7 vs 26 6;p < 0 001), and had higher prevalence of diabetes (48 3% vs 37 8%;p = 0 06) than those without HS HS was independently associated with increased odds of requiring admission to the ICU (odds ratio [OR] 1 75 [1 09-2 81], p = 0 02) and intubation (OR 2 58 [1 56-4 28], p < 0 001), as well as higher WHO ordinal scale (beta 0 51 [0 11-0 92], p = 0.013). There was no significant association between HS and death (OR 0 83 [0 42-1 67], p = 0 61) (Table 1) Conclusion: Analysis from our cohort showed that HS is associated with worse disease outcomes, evidenced by increased odds of ICU admission, intubation rate, and WHO ordinal scale in patients with COVID-19(Table Presented).

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL