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1.
J Infect Dis ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2017962

ABSTRACT

Interferon (IFN)-specific autoantibodies have been implicated in severe COVID-19 and have been proposed as a potential driver of the persistent symptoms characterizing Long COVID, a type of post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC). We report than only two of 215 SARS-CoV-2 convalescent participants tested over 394 timepoints, including 121 people experiencing Long COVID symptoms, had detectable IFN-α2 antibodies. Both had been hospitalized during the acute phase of the infection. These data suggest that persistent anti-IFN antibodies, although a potential driver of severe COVID-19, are unlikely to contribute to Long COVID symptoms in the post-acute phase of the infection.

2.
PubMed; 2022.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-338328

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying persistent cardiopulmonary symptoms following SARS-CoV-2 infection (post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 "PASC" or "Long COVID") remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary PASC using multimodality cardiovascular imaging including cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and ambulatory rhythm monitoring. METHODS: We performed CMR, CPET, and ambulatory rhythm monitoring among adults > 1 year after PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in the UCSF Long-Term Impact of Infection with Novel Coronavirus cohort (LIINC;NCT04362150 ) and correlated findings with previously measured biomarkers. We used logistic regression to estimate associations with PASC symptoms (dyspnea, chest pain, palpitations, and fatigue) adjusted for confounders and linear regression to estimate differences between those with and without symptoms adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Out of 120 participants in the cohort, 46 participants (unselected for symptom status) had at least one advanced cardiac test performed at median 17 months following initial SARS-CoV-2 infection. Median age was 52 (IQR 42-61), 18 (39%) were female, and 6 (13%) were hospitalized for severe acute infection. On CMR (n=39), higher extracellular volume was associated with symptoms, but no evidence of late-gadolinium enhancement or differences in T1 or T2 mapping were demonstrated. We did not find arrhythmias on ambulatory monitoring. In contrast, on CPET (n=39), 13/23 (57%) with cardiopulmonary symptoms or fatigue had reduced exercise capacity (peak VO 2 <85% predicted) compared to 2/16 (13%) without symptoms (p=0.008). The adjusted difference in peak VO 2 was 5.9 ml/kg/min lower (-9.6 to -2.3;p=0.002) or -21% predicted (-35 to -7;p=0.006) among those with symptoms. Chronotropic incompetence was the primary abnormality among 9/15 (60%) with reduced peak VO 2 . Adjusted heart rate reserve <80% was associated with reduced exercise capacity (OR 15.6, 95%CI 1.30-187;p=0.03). Inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels measured early in PASC were negatively correlated with peak VO 2 more than 1 year later. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiopulmonary symptoms and elevated inflammatory markers present early in PASC are associated with objectively reduced exercise capacity measured on cardiopulmonary exercise testing more than 1 year following COVID-19. Chronotropic incompetence may explain reduced exercise capacity among some individuals with PASC. Clinical Perspective: What is New?Elevated inflammatory markers in early post-acute COVID-19 are associated with reduced exercise capacity more than 1 year later.Impaired chronotropic response to exercise is associated with reduced exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary symptoms more than 1 year after SARS-CoV-2 infection.Findings on ambulatory rhythm monitoring point to perturbed autonomic function, while cardiac MRI findings argue against myocardial dysfunction and myocarditis. Clinical Implications: Cardiopulmonary testing to identify etiologies of persistent symptoms in post-acute sequalae of COVID-19 or "Long COVID" should be performed in a manner that allows for assessment of heart rate response to exercise. Therapeutic trials of anti-inflammatory and exercise strategies in PASC are urgently needed and should include assessment of symptoms and objective testing with cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

3.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326640

ABSTRACT

Background: Whether HIV infection is associated with differences in clinical outcomes among people hospitalized with COVID-19 is uncertain. Objective: To evaluate the impact of HIV infection on COVID-19 outcomes among hospitalized patients. Methods: Using the American Heart Association's COVID-19 Cardiovascular Disease registry, we used hierarchical mixed effects models to assess the association of HIV with in-hospital mortality accounting for patient demographics and comorbidities and clustering by hospital. Secondary outcomes included major adverse cardiac events (MACE), severity of illness, and length of stay (LOS). Results: The registry included 21,528 hospitalization records of people with confirmed COVID-19 from 107 hospitals in 2020, including 220 people living with HIV (PLWH). PLWH were younger (56.0+/-13.0 versus 61.3+/-17.9 years old) and more likely to be male (72.3% vs 52.7%), Non-Hispanic Black (51.4% vs 25.4%), on Medicaid (44.5% vs 24.5), and active tobacco users (12.7% versus 6.5%). Of the study population, 36 PLWH (16.4%) had in-hospital mortality compared with 3,290 (15.4%) without HIV (Risk ratio 1.06, 95%CI 0.79-1.43;risk difference 0.9%, 95%CI -4.2 to 6.1%;p=0.71). After adjustment for age, sex, race, and insurance, HIV was not associated with in-hospital mortality (aOR 1.13;95%CI 0.77-1.6;p 0.54) even after adding body mass index and comorbidities (aOR 1.15;95%CI 0.78-1.70;p=0.48). HIV was not associated with MACE (aOR 0.99, 95%CI 0.69-1.44, p=0.91), severity of illness (aOR 0.96, 95%CI 0.62-1.50, p=0.86), or LOS (aOR 1.03;95% CI 0.76-1.66, p=0.21). Conclusion: HIV was not associated with adverse outcomes of COVID-19 including in-hospital mortality, MACE, or severity of illness. Condensed Abstract: We studied 21,528 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at 107 hospitals in AHA's COVID-19 registry to examine the association between HIV and COVID-19 outcomes. More patients with HIV were younger, male, non-Hispanic Black, on Medicaid and current smokers. HIV was not associated with worse COVID-19 in-hospital mortality (Risk ratio 1.06, 95%CI 0.79-1.43;p=0.71) even after adjustment (aOR 1.15;95%CI 0.78-1.70;p=0.48). HIV was also not associated with MACE (aOR 0.99, 95%CI 0.69-1.44, p=0.91) or severity of illness (aOR 0.96, 95%CI 0.62-1.50, p=0.86. Our findings do not support that HIV is a major risk factor for adverse COVID-19 outcomes.

5.
PUBMED; 2021.
Preprint in English | PUBMED | ID: ppcovidwho-292909

ABSTRACT

Background: Whether HIV infection is associated with differences in clinical outcomes among people hospitalized with COVID-19 is uncertain. Objective: To evaluate the impact of HIV infection on COVID-19 outcomes among hospitalized patients. Methods: Using the American Heart Association's COVID-19 Cardiovascular Disease registry, we used hierarchical mixed effects models to assess the association of HIV with in-hospital mortality accounting for patient demographics and comorbidities and clustering by hospital. Secondary outcomes included major adverse cardiac events (MACE), severity of illness, and length of stay (LOS). Results: The registry included 21,528 hospitalization records of people with confirmed COVID-19 from 107 hospitals in 2020, including 220 people living with HIV (PLWH). PLWH were younger (56.0+/-13.0 versus 61.3+/-17.9 years old) and more likely to be male (72.3% vs 52.7%), Non-Hispanic Black (51.4% vs 25.4%), on Medicaid (44.5% vs 24.5), and active tobacco users (12.7% versus 6.5%). Of the study population, 36 PLWH (16.4%) had in-hospital mortality compared with 3,290 (15.4%) without HIV (Risk ratio 1.06, 95%CI 0.79-1.43;risk difference 0.9%, 95%CI -4.2 to 6.1%;p=0.71). After adjustment for age, sex, race, and insurance, HIV was not associated with in-hospital mortality (aOR 1.13;95%CI 0.77-1.6;p 0.54) even after adding body mass index and comorbidities (aOR 1.15;95%CI 0.78-1.70;p=0.48). HIV was not associated with MACE (aOR 0.99, 95%CI 0.69-1.44, p=0.91), severity of illness (aOR 0.96, 95%CI 0.62-1.50, p=0.86), or LOS (aOR 1.03;95% CI 0.76-1.66, p=0.21). Conclusion: HIV was not associated with adverse outcomes of COVID-19 including in-hospital mortality, MACE, or severity of illness. Condensed Abstract: We studied 21,528 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at 107 hospitals in AHA's COVID-19 registry to examine the association between HIV and COVID-19 outcomes. More patients with HIV were younger, male, non-Hispanic Black, on Medicaid and current smokers. HIV was not associated with worse COVID-19 in-hospital mortality (Risk ratio 1.06, 95%CI 0.79-1.43;p=0.71) even after adjustment (aOR 1.15;95%CI 0.78-1.70;p=0.48). HIV was also not associated with MACE (aOR 0.99, 95%CI 0.69-1.44, p=0.91) or severity of illness (aOR 0.96, 95%CI 0.62-1.50, p=0.86. Our findings do not support that HIV is a major risk factor for adverse COVID-19 outcomes.

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