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1.
J Infect Dis ; 2022 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1873926

ABSTRACT

Isolated reports of new-onset diabetes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have led researchers to hypothesize that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects human exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells ex vivo and in vivo. However, existing research lacks experimental evidence indicating that SARS-CoV-2 can infect pancreatic tissue. Here, we found that cats infected with a high dose of SARS-CoV-2 exhibited hyperglycemia. We also detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA in pancreatic tissues of these cats, and immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (NP) in islet cells. SARS-CoV-2 NP and spike proteins were primarily detected in glucagon-positive cells, and most glucagon-positive cells expressed ACE2. Additionally, immune protection experiments conducted on cats showed that blood glucose levels of immunized cats did not increase postchallenge. Our data indicate cat pancreas as a SARS-CoV-2 target and suggest that the infection of glucagon-positive cells could contribute to the metabolic dysregulation observed in SARS-CoV-2-infected cats.

2.
The Journal of infectious diseases ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1824578

ABSTRACT

Isolated reports of new-onset diabetes in patients with COVID-19 have led researchers to hypothesise that SARS-CoV-2 infects the human exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells ex vivo and in vivo. However, existing research lacks experimental evidence indicating that SARS-CoV-2 can infect pancreatic tissue. Here, we found that cats infected with a high dose of SARS-CoV-2 exhibited hyperglycaemia. We also detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the pancreatic tissues of these cats, and immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (NP) in the islet cells. SARS-CoV-2 NP and Spike proteins were primarily detected in Glu+ cells, and most Glu+ cells expressed ACE2. Additionally, immune protection experiments conducted on cats showed that the blood glucose levels of immunised cats did not increase post-challenge. Our data indicate the cat pancreas as a SARS-CoV-2 target and suggest that the infection of Glu+ cells could contribute to the metabolic dysregulation observed in SARS-CoV-2-infected cats.

3.
Pathogens ; 11(4)2022 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785870

ABSTRACT

Feline coronavirus (FCoV) infections present as one of two forms: a mild or symptom-less enteric infection (FEC) and a fatal systemic disease termed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The lack of epidemiology of FCoV in central China and the reason why different symptoms are caused by viruses of the same serotype have motivated this investigation. Clinical data of 81 suspected FIP cases, 116 diarrhea cases and 174 healthy cases were collected from veterinary hospitals using body cavity effusion or fecal samples. Risk factors, sequence comparison and phylogenetic studies were performed. The results indicated that FIPV was distinguished from FECV in the average hydrophobicity of amino acids among the cleavage sites of furin, as well as the mutation sites 23,531 and 23,537. FIPV included a higher minimal R-X-X-R recognition motif of furin (41.94%) than did FECV (9.1%). The serotype of FCoV was insignificantly correlated with FIP, and the clade 1 and clade 2 strains that appeared were unique to central China. Thus, it is hypothesized that this, along with the latent variables of an antigenic epitope at positions 1058 and 1060, as well as mutations at the S1/S2 sites, are important factors affecting FCoV transmission and pathogenicity.

4.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 69(2): 591-597, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241029

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in an unprecedented public health crisis and economic losses. Although several cases of cats and dogs infected with SARS-CoV-2 have been reported during this outbreak, the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in dog and its transmission among other companion animals are still unknown. Here, we report an extensive serological study of SARS-CoV-2 infection in dogs in Wuhan and analyse the infection rates at different stages of the pandemic outbreak. A total of 946 dogs serum samples were collected from Wuhan, of which 36 samples were obtained prior to the pandemic outbreak. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that 16 sera collected during the outbreak were detected as positive through the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2. Of these 16 sera, 10 exhibited measurable SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies whose titres ranged from 1/20 to 1/180. No serological cross-reactivity was detected between SARS-CoV-2 and canine coronavirus (CCV). Furthermore, with the effective control of the outbreak, a decrease in the SARS-CoV-2 seropositive dog number was observed. Our results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 has infected companion dogs during the outbreak, and that COVID-19 patient families have a higher risk of dog infection. Our findings deepen our understanding of the infection of SARS-CoV-2 in dogs and provide an important reference for prevention of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , Cats , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/veterinary , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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