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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-321369

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic seriously threatens general public health services globally. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV care continuum in Jiangsu province, China. Methods Data for analysis was retrieved from the web-based Comprehensive Response Information Management System (CRIMS) for HIV/AIDS in China. We used time series model of seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and Exponential smoothing to predict the amount of HIV care services during the COVID-19 measures, and Chi-square were performed to assess subgroup differences. Results Overall, the testing rated decreased 49.0% (919,938) decrease in the first three months during the COVID-19 measures, as compared with the estimated number. Although an estimated of 1555 confirmatory tests were expected in the first three months during the COVID-19 measures, only 48.7% (757) confirmed HIV/AIDS cases were actually recorded. In the actual data during the first period of COVID-19, 980 clients received confirmatory tests, only 71.4% (700) were reportedly linked to care. Only 49.5% (235) out of the expected 475 estimated number of clients received CD4 cell count test services. Meanwhile 91.23% (208) had initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) which compared to 227 the estimated number of initiated ART. Compared with the same period during 2016 to 2019, PLWHIV who were less than 30, migrants were more likely to be influenced by the COVID-19 policies. Conclusions The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on the HIV healthcare systems in Jiangsu, China. Further measures that can encounter the impact of the pandemic are needed, in order to maintain HIV care continuum.

2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 768, 2021 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic seriously threatens general public health services globally. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the HIV care continuum in Jiangsu province, China. METHODS: Data on newly diagnosed HIV persons for analysis were retrieved from Chinas' web-based Comprehensive Response Information Management System (CRIMS) for HIV/AIDS from 2016 to 2020. We recorded data for the first 3 months (January to March, 2020) of strictly implementing COVID-19 measures from publicly available disease databases of the Jiangsu provincial Health Committee. We used seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and exponential smoothing in forecasting the parameters. Subgroup differences were accessed using Chi-square tests. RESULTS: Compared to the estimated proportions, the HIV testing rates decreased by 49.0% (919,938) in the first three months of implementing COVID-19 measures. Of an estimated 1555 new HIV diagnosis expected in the same period, only 63.0% (980) new diagnoses were recorded. According to actual data recorded during the said period, 980 positively tested persons received confirmatory tests, of which 71.4% (700) were reportedly linked to care. And only 49.5% (235) out of the expected 475 newly diagnosed HIV persons received CD4 cell count testing. Meanwhile 91.6% (208) of newly diagnosed HIV persons who received CD4 count tests reportedly initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared to the 227 expected. Compared to the same period from 2016 to 2019, PLWH less than 30 years old and migrants were more likely to be affected by the COVID-19 policies. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted HIV healthcare systems in Jiangsu, China. Further measures that can counter the impact of the pandemic are needed to maintain the HIV care continuum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , HIV Infections , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374402

ABSTRACT

Nowadays people are mostly focused on their work while ignoring their health which in turn is creating a drastic effect on their health in the long run. Remote health monitoring through telemedicine can help people discover potential health threats in time. In the COVID-19 pandemic, remote health monitoring can help obtain and analyze biomedical signals including human body temperature without direct body contact. This technique is of great significance to achieve safe and efficient health monitoring in the COVID-19 pandemic. Existing remote biomedical signal monitoring methods cannot effectively analyze the time series data. This paper designs a remote biomedical signal monitoring framework combining the Internet of Things (IoT), 5G communication and artificial intelligence techniques. In the constructed framework, IoT devices are used to collect biomedical signals at the perception layer. Subsequently, the biomedical signals are transmitted through the 5G network to the cloud server where the GRU-AE deep learning model is deployed. It is noteworthy that the proposed GRU-AE model can analyze multi-dimensional biomedical signals in time series. Finally, this paper conducts a 24-week monitoring experiment for 2000 subjects of different ages to obtain real data. Compared with the traditional biomedical signal monitoring method based on the AutoEncoder model, the GRU-AE model has better performance. The research has an important role in promoting the development of biomedical signal monitoring techniques, which can be effectively applied to some kinds of remote health monitoring scenario.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet of Things , Artificial Intelligence , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1612

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic seriously threatens general public health services globally. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic

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