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1.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 566609, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699160

ABSTRACT

OBJECT: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of α-Lipoic acid (ALA) for critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: A randomized, single-blind, group sequential, active-controlled trial was performed at JinYinTan Hospital, Wuhan, China. Between February 2020 and March 2020, 17 patients with critically ill COVID-19 were enrolled in our study. Eligible patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either ALA (1200 mg/d, intravenous infusion) once daily plus standard care or standard care plus equal volume saline infusion (placebo) for 7 days. All patients were monitored within the 7 days therapy and followed up to day 30 after therapy. The primary outcome of this study was the Sequential Organ Failure Estimate (SOFA) score, and the secondary outcome was the all-cause mortality within 30 days. RESULT: Nine patients were randomized to placebo group and 8 patients were randomized to ALA group. SOFA score was similar at baseline, increased from 4.3 to 6.0 in the placebo group and increased from 3.8 to 4.0 in the ALA group (P = 0.36) after 7 days. The 30-day all-cause mortality tended to be lower in the ALA group (3/8, 37.5%) compared to that in the placebo group (7/9, 77.8%, P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: In our study, ALA use is associated with lower SOFA score increase and lower 30-day all-cause mortality as compared with the placebo group. Although the mortality rate was two-folds higher in placebo group than in ALA group, only borderline statistical difference was evidenced due to the limited patient number. Future studies with larger patient cohort are warranted to validate the role of ALA in critically ill patients with COVID-19. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.chictr.org.cn/showproj.aspx?proj=49534.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322593

ABSTRACT

Background: Accurate and sensitive detection of antibody to SARS-CoV-2 remains an essential component of the pandemic response. Measuring antibody that predicts neutralising activity and the vaccine response is an absolute requirement for laboratory-based confirmatory and reference activity.Methods: The viral receptor binding domain (RBD) constitutes the prime target antigen for neutralising antibody. A double antigen binding assay (DABA) provides the most sensitive format. It has been exploited in a novel hybrid manner employing an S1 solid-phase preferentially presenting RBD once solid-phase bound, coupled with a labelled RBD conjugate, used in a two-step sequential assay.Findings: This assay showed a specificity of 100% on 825 pre COVID-19 samples and a potential sensitivity of 99.6% on 276 recovery samples, predicting quantitatively the presence of neutralising antibody determined by pseudo-type neutralisation and by plaque reduction. Anti-RBD is also measurable in ferrets immunised with ChadOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. The early response at presentation with illness, elevated responsiveness with disease severity, detection of asymptomatic seroconversion and persistence after the loss of antibody to the nucleoprotein (anti-NP) are all documented.Trial Registration: The ISARIC WHO CCP-UK study was registered at https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN66726260 and designated an Urgent Public Health Research Study by NIHR.Interpretation: The hybrid DABA displays the attributes necessary for an antibody test to be used in both clinical and reference serology. It allows the neutralising antibody response to be inferred early in infection and potentially in vaccine recipients. It is also of sufficient sensitivity to be used to provide serological confirmation of prior infection and provides a more secure measure for seroprevalence studies in the population generally than does anti-NP based on the Architect platform.Funding: This work is variously supported by grants from: the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR;award CO-CIN-01), the Medical Research Council (MRC;grant MC_PC_19059 and MC_PC_19078), MRC NIHR (grant CV220-111) and by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections at University of Liverpool in partnership with Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the University of Oxford (award 200907), NIHR HPRU in Respiratory Infections at Imperial College London with PHE (award 200927), Wellcome Trust and Department for International Development (DID;215091/Z/18/Z), the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1209135), Liverpool Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (grant reference C18616/A25153), NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Imperial College London (IS-BRC-1215-20013), EU Platform for European Preparedness Against (Re-)emerging Epidemics (PREPARE;FP7 project 602525), and NIHR Clinical Research Network for providing infrastructure support for this research.Declaration of Interests: RST, MOM and PC report patent pending (Patent Application No. 2011047.4 for “SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection assay). All other authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: The use of tissues was approved by the CDRTB Steering Committee in accordance with the responsibility delegated by the National Research Ethics Service (South Central Ethics Committee – C, NRES reference 15/SC/0089).Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Ethical approval was given by the South Central–Oxford C Research Ethics Committee in England (reference: 13/SC/0149), Scotland A Research Ethics Committee (reference: 20/SS/0028) and World Health Organization Ethics Review Committee (RPC571 and RPC572l;25 April 2013)

3.
J Virol Methods ; 302: 114475, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1652648

ABSTRACT

Accurate and sensitive detection of antibody to SARS-CoV-2 remains an essential component of the pandemic response. Measuring antibody that predicts neutralising activity and the vaccine response is an absolute requirement for laboratory-based confirmatory and reference activity. The viral receptor binding domain (RBD) constitutes the prime target antigen for neutralising antibody. A double antigen binding assay (DABA), providing the most sensitive format has been exploited in a novel hybrid manner employing a solid-phase S1 preferentially presenting RBD, coupled with a labelled RBD conjugate, used in a two-step sequential assay for detection and measurement of antibody to RBD (anti-RBD). This class and species neutral assay showed a specificity of 100 % on 825 pre COVID-19 samples and a potential sensitivity of 99.6 % on 276 recovery samples, predicting quantitatively the presence of neutralising antibody determined by pseudo-type neutralization and by plaque reduction. Anti-RBD is also measurable in ferrets immunised with ChadOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine and in humans immunised with both AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines. This assay detects anti-RBD at presentation with illness, demonstrates its elevation with disease severity, its sequel to asymptomatic infection and its persistence after the loss of antibody to the nucleoprotein (anti-NP). It also provides serological confirmation of prior infection and offers a secure measure for seroprevalence and studies of vaccine immunisation in human and animal populations. The hybrid DABA also displays the attributes necessary for the detection and quantification of anti-RBD to be used in clinical practice. An absence of detectable anti-RBD by this assay predicates the need for passive immune prophylaxis in at-risk patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , Ferrets , Humans , RNA, Viral , Seroepidemiologic Studies
4.
Talanta ; 236: 122847, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401881

ABSTRACT

Nucleocapsid protein (N protein) is the most abundant protein in SARS-CoV2 and is highly conserved, and there are no homologous proteins in the human body, making it an ideal biomarker for the early diagnosis of SARS-CoV2. However, early detection of clinical specimens for SARS-CoV2 remains a challenge due to false-negative results with viral RNA and host antibodies based testing. In this manuscript, a microfluidic chip with femtoliter-sized wells was fabricated for the sensitive digital detection of N protein. Briefly, ß-galactosidase (ß-Gal)-linked antibody/N protein/aptamer immunocomplexes were formed on magnetic beads (MBs). Afterwards, the MBs and ß-Gal substrate fluorescein-di-ß-d-galactopyranoside (FDG) were injected into the chip together. Each well of the chip would only hold one MB as confined by the diameter of the wells. The MBs in the wells were sealed by fluorocarbon oil, which confines the fluorescent (FL) product generated from the reaction between ß-Gal and FDG in the individual femtoliter-sized well and creates a locally high concentration of the FL product. The FL images of the wells were acquired using a conventional inverted FL microscope. The number of FL wells with MBs (FL wells number) and the number of wells with MBs (MBs wells number) were counted, respectively. The percentage of FL wells was calculated by dividing (FL wells number) by (MBs wells number). The higher the percentage of FL wells, the higher the N protein concentration. The detection limit of this digital method for N protein was 33.28 pg/mL, which was 300 times lower than traditional double-antibody sandwich based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).


Subject(s)
Immunoassay/methods , Nucleocapsid Proteins , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Nucleocapsid Proteins/isolation & purification , RNA, Viral
5.
J Control Release ; 338: 201-210, 2021 10 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364213

ABSTRACT

Self-amplifying RNA (saRNA) is a next-generation vaccine platform, but like all nucleic acids, requires a delivery vehicle to promote cellular uptake and protect the saRNA from degradation. To date, delivery platforms for saRNA have included lipid nanoparticles (LNP), polyplexes and cationic nanoemulsions; of these LNP are the most clinically advanced with the recent FDA approval of COVID-19 based-modified mRNA vaccines. While the effect of RNA on vaccine immunogenicity is well studied, the role of biomaterials in saRNA vaccine effectiveness is under investigated. Here, we tested saRNA formulated with either pABOL, a bioreducible polymer, or LNP, and characterized the protein expression and vaccine immunogenicity of both platforms. We observed that pABOL-formulated saRNA resulted in a higher magnitude of protein expression, but that the LNP formulations were overall more immunogenic. Furthermore, we observed that both the helper phospholipid and route of administration (intramuscular versus intranasal) of LNP impacted the vaccine immunogenicity of two model antigens (influenza hemagglutinin and SARS-CoV-2 spike protein). We observed that LNP administered intramuscularly, but not pABOL or LNP administered intranasally, resulted in increased acute interleukin-6 expression after vaccination. Overall, these results indicate that delivery systems and routes of administration may fulfill different delivery niches within the field of saRNA genetic medicines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Nanoparticles , Humans , Lipids , Polymers , RNA , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
6.
Neurocomputing ; 458: 232-245, 2021 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260826

ABSTRACT

The outbreak and rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had a huge impact on the lives and safety of people around the world. Chest CT is considered an effective tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of COVID-19. For faster examination, automatic COVID-19 diagnostic techniques using deep learning on CT images have received increasing attention. However, the number and category of existing datasets for COVID-19 diagnosis that can be used for training are limited, and the number of initial COVID-19 samples is much smaller than the normal's, which leads to the problem of class imbalance. It makes the classification algorithms difficult to learn the discriminative boundaries since the data of some classes are rich while others are scarce. Therefore, training robust deep neural networks with imbalanced data is a fundamental challenging but important task in the diagnosis of COVID-19. In this paper, we create a challenging clinical dataset (named COVID19-Diag) with category diversity and propose a novel imbalanced data classification method using deep supervised learning with a self-adaptive auxiliary loss (DSN-SAAL) for COVID-19 diagnosis. The loss function considers both the effects of data overlap between CT slices and possible noisy labels in clinical datasets on a multi-scale, deep supervised network framework by integrating the effective number of samples and a weighting regularization item. The learning process jointly and automatically optimizes all parameters over the deep supervised network, making our model generally applicable to a wide range of datasets. Extensive experiments are conducted on COVID19-Diag and three public COVID-19 diagnosis datasets. The results show that our DSN-SAAL outperforms the state-of-the-art methods and is effective for the diagnosis of COVID-19 in varying degrees of data imbalance.

7.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 2893, 2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232068

ABSTRACT

Several vaccines have demonstrated efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 mediated disease, yet there is limited data on the immune response induced by heterologous vaccination regimens using alternate vaccine modalities. Here, we present a detailed description of the immune response, in mice, following vaccination with a self-amplifying RNA (saRNA) vaccine and an adenoviral vectored vaccine (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/AZD1222) against SARS-CoV-2. We demonstrate that antibody responses are higher in two-dose heterologous vaccination regimens than single-dose regimens. Neutralising titres after heterologous prime-boost were at least comparable or higher than the titres measured after homologous prime boost vaccination with viral vectors. Importantly, the cellular immune response after a heterologous regimen is dominated by cytotoxic T cells and Th1+ CD4 T cells, which is superior to the response induced in homologous vaccination regimens in mice. These results underpin the need for clinical trials to investigate the immunogenicity of heterologous regimens with alternate vaccine technologies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , RNA, Viral/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunization, Secondary , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Mice , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
8.
Mol Ther ; 29(3): 1174-1185, 2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985497

ABSTRACT

Self-amplifying RNA (saRNA) is a cutting-edge platform for both nucleic acid vaccines and therapeutics. saRNA is self-adjuvanting, as it activates types I and III interferon (IFN), which enhances the immunogenicity of RNA vaccines but can also lead to inhibition of translation. In this study, we screened a library of saRNA constructs with cis-encoded innate inhibiting proteins (IIPs) and determined the effect on protein expression and immunogenicity. We observed that the PIV-5 V and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) ORF4a proteins enhance protein expression 100- to 500-fold in vitro in IFN-competent HeLa and MRC5 cells. We found that the MERS-CoV ORF4a protein partially abates dose nonlinearity in vivo, and that ruxolitinib, a potent Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) inhibitor, but not the IIPs, enhances protein expression of saRNA in vivo. Both the PIV-5 V and MERS-CoV ORF4a proteins were found to enhance the percentage of resident cells in human skin explants expressing saRNA and completely rescued dose nonlinearity of saRNA. Finally, we observed that the MERS-CoV ORF4a increased the rabies virus (RABV)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and neutralization half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) by ∼10-fold in rabbits, but not in mice or rats. These experiments provide a proof of concept that IIPs can be directly encoded into saRNA vectors and effectively abate the nonlinear dose dependency and enhance immunogenicity.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/administration & dosage , Animals , Cell Line , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/drug effects , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/immunology , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/pathogenicity , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression Regulation , HeLa Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/immunology , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Nitriles , Parainfluenza Virus 5/drug effects , Parainfluenza Virus 5/immunology , Parainfluenza Virus 5/pathogenicity , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrimidines , Rabbits , Rabies virus/drug effects , Rabies virus/immunology , Rabies virus/pathogenicity , Rats , STAT Transcription Factors/antagonists & inhibitors , STAT Transcription Factors/genetics , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Signal Transduction , Vaccines, Synthetic/biosynthesis , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology
9.
SciFinder; 2020.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-5289

ABSTRACT

A review. Severe acute respiratory syndrome-novel coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) poses great challenges for public health in China. Among the reported coronavirus disease 2019 patients, most of them are aged, and a large proportion of them are combined with chronic basic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Heart failure is the end stage of various cardiovascular diseases. Patients with heart failure should strengthen their cognition and management in this epidemic. This review makes a comprehensive discussion between sars-cov-2 and heart failure.

11.
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol ; 76(2): 123-124, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-683080
12.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3523, 2020 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640262

ABSTRACT

The spread of the SARS-CoV-2 into a global pandemic within a few months of onset motivates the development of a rapidly scalable vaccine. Here, we present a self-amplifying RNA encoding the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein encapsulated within a lipid nanoparticle (LNP) as a vaccine. We observe remarkably high and dose-dependent SARS-CoV-2 specific antibody titers in mouse sera, as well as robust neutralization of both a pseudo-virus and wild-type virus. Upon further characterization we find that the neutralization is proportional to the quantity of specific IgG and of higher magnitude than recovered COVID-19 patients. saRNA LNP immunizations induce a Th1-biased response in mice, and there is no antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) observed. Finally, we observe high cellular responses, as characterized by IFN-γ production, upon re-stimulation with SARS-CoV-2 peptides. These data provide insight into the vaccine design and evaluation of immunogenicity to enable rapid translation to the clinic.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement/immunology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/chemistry , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Viral Vaccines/chemistry
13.
Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue ; 32(5): 544-547, 2020 May.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613525

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the risk factors of death in patients with severe and critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their predictive value. METHODS: Using the clinical and epidemiological database of Yangtze River Shipping General Hospital in Wuhan, the clinical and epidemiological data of 105 patients with severe and critical COVID-19 from January to March in 2020 were collected. Multivariate unconditional Logistic regression method was used to analyze the death risk factors of patients during hospitalization. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn according to the multivariate analysis results to construct a death prediction model; the prediction value of the model was analyzed. RESULTS: The 105 patients with severe and critical COVID-19 were enrolled with 66 males (62.9%) and 39 females (37.1%). The age was (58.2±14.4) years old. Forty-two patients died in hospital and 63 survived. Among the dead patients, 69.0% (29/42) were male, and 78.6% (33/42) were over 60 years old. Compared with survival patients, the non-survival patients were older (years old: 59.2±12.5 vs. 51.2±11.4), and had more comorbidities, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, myocardial damage and thrombocytopenia (coronary heart disease: 33.3% vs. 11.1%, hypertension: 28.6% vs. 9.5%, myocardial damage: 73.8% vs. 11.1%, thrombocytopenia: 61.9% vs. 14.3%), and received more mechanical ventilation (92.9% vs. 44.4%), with significant differences (all P < 0.01). The variables of gender, age, basic diseases, mechanical ventilation and complications were included in the unconditional Logistic regression analysis, which showed that gender [odds ratio (OR) = 2.852, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was 0.122-66.694], age (OR = 3.257, 95%CI was 0.466-18.584), coronary heart disease (OR = 7.337, 95%CI was 0.227-87.021), hypertension (OR = 5.517, 95%CI was 0.258-65.024) and concurrent myocardial damage (OR = 7.322, 95%CI was 0.278-95.020) and thrombocytopenia (OR = 3.968, 95%CI was 0.325-35.549) were independent risk factors for death in patients with severe and critical COVID-19 during hospitalization. According to the risk factors, the death prediction model was constructed and ROC curve was analyzed, which showed that the area under ROC curve (AUC) of death prediction model for predicting the mortality of patients with severe and critical COVID-19 during hospitalization was 0.804, the sensitivity was 83.8%, and the specificity was 82.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Various risk factors are associated with the death of severe or critical COVID-19 patients, such as gender, age, basic diseases and complications. The death prediction model is constructed by gender, age, basic diseases with coronary heart disease and hypertension, concurrent myocardial damage and thrombocytopenia, which has certain predictive value for the death of patients with severe or critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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