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1.
Asian Toxicology Research ; 2(1):1-7, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-1017207

ABSTRACT

A review on new coronavirus-infected pneumonia in Wuhan, China

2.
J Psychiatr Res ; 2020 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894074

ABSTRACT

The major Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak caused tens of thousands of diagnosed patients quarantined and treated in designated hospitals in Wuhan, the epicenter of the disease in China. Evidence for the psychological problems of COVID-19 patients was limited. Here we report a cross-sectional study of the mental distress and sleep quality of patients in a single center in Wuhan. The study was based on a combined questionnaire of basic questions designed by the study group, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). On Feb 17th and Mar 14th, two groups of patients were recruited respectively in a designated hospital for COVID-19. Univariate analysis and regression models were used to identify predictors for patients' psychological distress and sleep quality. In total, there were 202 participants in our combined sample. The average SAS, SDS, and PSQI score of participants were 44.2, 51.7, and 9.3 respectively. Factors associated with SAS score include gender, subjective evaluation of disease symptoms, and evaluation of medical staffs' attitude. Gender, age, education level, frequency of contacting with family, subjective knowledge level of COVID 19, and evaluation of medical staffs' attitude are associated with participants SDS score. Factors associated with PSQI score are age and subjective evaluation of disease symptoms.

3.
BMJ Support Palliat Care ; 2020 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-788171

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Because of the lack of vaccination, it is urgent to find effective antiviral agents for COVID-19 treatment. METHOD: Online databases were searched for articles published before or on 22 June 2020. Studies reporting the effectiveness and safety of antiviral agents for COVID-19 were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 42 studies were included in this analysis. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) was not associated with the incidence of death (risk ratio (RR)=1.08; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.44) and severe cases (RR=1.05; 95% CI 0.61 to 1.81). Patients treated with HCQ obtained few benefits with respect to the clearance of viral RNA and were more likely to have adverse reactions. HCQ treatment could shorten the body temperature recovery time (weighted mean difference = -1.04; 95% CI -1.64 to -0.45). Lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) (RR=0.90; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.07) and Arbidol (RR=1.09; 95% CI 0.92 to 1.29) were not associated with the negative conversion rate. Integrative Chinese-Western medicine alleviated clinical symptoms and decreased the incidence of severe cases (RR=0.38; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.59). Remdesivir treatment reduced the 14-day mortality rate of patients with severe COVID-19 (RR=0.64; 95% CI 0.44 to 0.94). Convalescent plasma (CP) tended to increase the negative conversion rate (RR=2.47; 95% CI 1.70 to 3.57). CONCLUSION: HCQ, LPV/r and Arbidol bring little benefit in COVID-19 treatment. Integrative Chinese-Western medicine improved the clinical symptoms of patients with COVID-19. Remdesivir and CP might be the potential treatments for patients with severe COVID-19. However, large-scale clinical randomised trials are needed to validate our conclusions.

4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 647, 2020 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744977

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The family cluster is one of most important modes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission throughout China, and more details are needed about how family clusters cause the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). CASE PRESENTATION: We retrospectively reviewed 7 confirmed cases from one family cluster. Both clinical features and laboratory examination results were described. Patient 1 had been in close contact with someone who was later confirmed to have COVID-19 in Wuhan City before he returned back to his hometown. He had dinner with 6 other members in his family. All the persons developed COVID-19 successively except for one older woman who neither had dinner with them nor shared a sleeping room with her husband. Six patients had mild or moderate COVID-19 but one older man with underlying diseases progressed into the severe type. After general and symptomatic treatments, all the patients recovered. CONCLUSIONS: In a family cluster, having dinner together may be an important mode for the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In this setting, most cases are mild with a favorable prognosis, while elderly patients with underlying diseases may progress into the severe type. For someone who has close contact with a confirmed case, 14-day isolation is necessary to contain virus transmission.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Family Health , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Child , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies
5.
International Journal of Social Science and Education Research ; 3(6):150-153, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-381036

ABSTRACT

In year 2020, in response to unexpected Coronavirus, the Chinese Ministry of Education put forward the requirements of "classes suspended but teaching won't stop, classes suspended but learning won't stop" The "Learning Revolution" in education has been furtherpromoted With the strong support and cooperation of the government, radio and television stations, network companies and parents, 200 million students in China achieved home-based classes

6.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(3): 250-256, 2020 Mar 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-210168

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine imaging features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in different stages, and to provide foundations for early diagnosis and treatment. METHODS: CT image data of 187 COVID-19 patients were analyzed in the period of hospitalization. CT scanning was performed on admission and repeated every 3 days. The improvement time of clinical symptoms and the image changes of follow-up CT were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: All 187 patients' nucleic acid test were positive to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The early CT images of lung in 187 cases (100%) showed multiple patchy and ground-glass opacities with fine mesh and consolidation shade, which mainly distributed in pulmonary band or under the pleura. In the progressive stage, the pulmonary lesions in 146 cases (78.1%) were mainly consolidation, accompanied by air bronchogram, thickening of blood vessels, and interstitial changes. Severe pulmonary CT images in 15 cases (8%) showed diffuse lesions in both lungs, displaying consolidation, or "white lung". The CT imaging features in 185 cases (98.9%) at the absorptive period showed that the lesions diminished and fibrogenesis. The imaging features of 6 times of lung CT examination in one case showed continuous progress. The original lesion in one case was obviously absorbed, but new lesions appeared under the pleura of both lungs at the third review of CT scanning. The changes of CT imaging lesions during follow-up were significantly different in different clinical symptoms improvement time (P< 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Images of COVID-19 in various stages have special characteristics. The change of clinical symptoms is synchronous with the change of reexamination CT. Follow-up CT can reflect the trend of clinical changes. Repeat CT examination plays an important role in the early clinical diagnosis and the evaluation for the therapeutic effect on COVID-19 patient.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Pandemics , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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