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1.
Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology ; JOUR:197, 37(Supplement 1).
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2088260

ABSTRACT

Background and Aim: Accurate assessment of patient-reported oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) is essential to guide appropriate management and evaluate its response. The Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) is a paper-based 17-item inventory developed and validated to objectively assess OPD. An easy-to-use electronic questionnaire version with automated answer upload has significant potential to streamline remote patient assessment, especially in COVID-19-affected populations. The aim of this study was to develop an electronic version of the SSQ (eSSQ) and validate it against the original paper version. Method(s): The eSSQ was translated from the paper version on the online REDCAP platform and developed to be accessible on computer and mobile devices. Recruited patients with OPD and asymptomatic controls completed both electronic and paper versions in randomized order. Patients with stable symptoms during the study period then repeated the eSSQ after >=14 days for test-retest reliability. Agreement of total scores between both versions and eSSQ test-retest reliability were calculated using two-way mixed-effects intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Result(s): A total of 44 dysphagic patients and 32 controls were recruited. The most common underlying etiology for dysphagia was head and neck cancer. Mean eSSQ total score was 800 in dysphagic patients and 67 in controls. eSSQ had excellent agreement with the paper SSQ in total scores among all participants (ICC, 0.99;95% CI, 0.98-0.99) and in dysphagic patients (ICC, 0.97;95% CI, 0.94-0.98), as well as excellent test-retest reliability (ICC, 0.96;95% CI, 0.90-0.98). Conclusion(s): The newly developed eSSQ shows excellent agreement with the paper SSQ and test-retest reliability. Future applications of its use may allow for more efficient and accessible patient assessment.

2.
Tourism Management Perspectives ; 44, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2076771

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, travel live streaming has been increasingly implemented by online travel agents as an effective approach for economic recovery. However, little is known about users' motivations for participating in this activity. This study aims to understand Chinese customers' motivations by developing a measurement scale based on in-depth interviews and surveys. Eight motivators were extracted: socializing & belonging, media engagement, remuneration, product examination, relaxation & escape, entertainment & novelty, self-development, and immersion experience. This study deepens the understanding of China's live-streaming business and the preferences of tourists, inspiring future product design and marketing. © 2022 Elsevier Ltd

3.
Internet of Things ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed Central | ID: covidwho-2061292

ABSTRACT

IoT-based crowd-sensing network, which aims to achieve data collection and task allocation to mobile users, become more and more popular in recent years. This data collected by IoT devices may be private and directly transmission of these data maybe incur privacy leakage. With the help of homomorphic encryption (HE), which supports the additive and/or multiplicative operations over the encrypted data, privacy preserving crowd-sensing network is now possible. Until now several such secure data aggregation schemes based on HE have been proposed. In many cases, ciphertext comparison is an important step for further secure data processing. However efficient ciphertext comparison is not supported by most such schemes. In this paper, aiming at enabling ciphertext comparison among multiple users in crowd-sensing network, with Lagrange’s interpolation technique we propose comparable homomorphic encryption (CompHE) schemes. We also prove our schemes’ security, and the performance analysis show our schemes are practical. We also discuss the applications of our IoT based crowd-sensing network with comparable homomorphic encryption for combatting COVID19, including the first example of privacy preserving close contact determination based on the spatial distance, and the second example of privacy preserving social distance controlling based on the spatial difference of lockdown zones, controlled zones and precautionary zones. From the analysis we see our IoT based crowd-sensing network can be used for contact tracing without worrying about the privacy leakage. Compared with the existing CompHE schemes, our proposals can be collusion resistance or secure in the semi-honest model while the previous schemes can not achieve this easily. Our schemes only need 4 or 5 modular exponentiation when implementing the most important comparison algorithm, which are better than the existing closely related scheme with advantage of 50% or 37.5%.

4.
China Agricultural Economic Review ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1997097

ABSTRACT

Purpose Given the scarcity of data during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in China, the decision-making for non-pharmaceutical policies was mostly based on insufficient evidence. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of these policies, such as lockdown and government subsidies, on rural households and identify policy implications for China and other countries in dealing with pandemics. Design/methodology/approach The authors survey 2,408 rural households by telephone from 101 counties across 17 provinces in China during the first stage of the pandemic (March 2020). The authors use the ordered probit model and linear regression model to study the overall impact of policies and then use the quantile regression model and sub-sample regression method to study the heterogeneity of the effects of government policies. Findings The authors find that logistics disruption due to lockdown negatively affected rural households. Obstructed logistics is associated with a more significant loss for high-income households, while its impact on the loss expectation of low-income households is more severe. Breeding and other industries such as transport and sales suffer more from logistics than cultivation. The impact of logistics on intensive agricultural entities is more serious than that on professional farms. The government subsidy is more effective at reducing loss for low-income households. Lockdown and government subsidies have shown heterogeneous impacts on rural households. Practical implications The overall economic losses experienced by rural households in the early stages of the pandemic are controllable. The government policies of logistics and subsidies should target specific groups. Originality/value The authors evaluate the economic impacts of lockdown and government subsidies on rural households and show their heterogeneity among different groups. The authors further demonstrate the policy effectiveness in supporting rural households during the early stages of the pandemic and provide future policy guidance on major public health event.

5.
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction ; 79, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1959577

ABSTRACT

While remote working has been applied as an emerging flexible modern work arrangement and as an effective way to maintain social distancing during pandemics, it may result in negative workplace outcomes. Despite the eulogy on remote working, more research is needed to examine its possible negative effects on employees in the workplace. This study aims to fill these gaps by examining the effects of remote working on work-family conflict and workplace wellbeing during pandemics, and how such effects are moderated by employees’ general self-efficacy and job autonomy. Survey data was collected from 399 Chinese employees during COVID-19. The results show that remote working has a positive effect on work-family conflict, which in turn decreases workplace wellbeing. Further analyses show that while the work-family conflict dimension of family interfering with work (FIW) has a negative effect on wellbeing, the effect of the work-family conflict dimension of work interfering with family (WIF) on wellbeing is not significant. Besides, the effect of remote working on FIW is positively moderated by general self-efficacy and job autonomy. Lastly, the effect of remote working differs depending on the extent to which remote working is implemented. Our study contributes to the literature by explaining the negative effect of remote working on workplace wellbeing during pandemics and clarifying its boundary conditions. Our results provide managers useful guidelines regarding how to implement remote working. © 2022 Elsevier Ltd

6.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925137

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and mechanism of Clinically Designed Improvisatory Music (CDIM) to induce calmness and stress relief in patients admitted to the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU). Background: Epilepsy monitoring requires simulating seizure-inducing conditions which frequently causes discomfort to EMU patients. COVID-19 hospital restrictions added another layer of stress upon hospital admission. The purpose of this research was to provide evidence that CDIM brings relief to EMU patients. Design/Methods: Five individuals with epileptic seizures in the EMU during the COVID-19 lockdown participated in the study (average age+ SD=30.2 + 6). Continuous video EEG and heart tracing were obtained before, during, and after live CDIM. CDIM consisted of 40 minutes of virtual calming music played by a music practitioner on viola. Post-intervention surveys assessed patients' emotional state. Alpha/beta power spectral density ratio was calculated for each subject across the brain and was evaluated using one-way repeated analysis of variance, comparing 20 minutes before, during, and 20 minutes after CDIM. Post-hoc analysis was performed using paired t-test. Results: Patients reported enhanced emotional state (9.25/10), contentment (9.5/10), and decreased restlessness (8.75/10) on a 10-point Likert scale. Compared to baseline, all experienced decreases in heart rate during CDIM. Alpha/beta ratio increased at whole-brain and regional levels during CDIM and persisted post-intervention. There was a significant main effect of CDIM on alpha/beta ratio (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Consistent with investigations in patients with depression and anxiety, we found positive effects of music as reported by patients, a decrease in heart rate, an increased alpha/beta ratio due to calming effect in response to CDIM. These effects persisted for at least 20 minutes post-intervention. Our study provides proof of concept that live CDIM provided demonstrable comfort for patients admitted in the EMU during the COVID-19 pandemic.

7.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-333739

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected over 110 million individuals and led to 2.5 million deaths worldwide. As more individuals are vaccinated, the clinical performance and utility of SARS-CoV-2 serology platforms needs to be evaluated. METHODS: The ability of four commercial SARS-CoV-2 serology platforms to detect previous infection or vaccination were evaluated using a cohort of 53 SARS-CoV-2 PCR-positive patients, 89 SARS-CoV-2-vaccinated healthcare workers (Pfizer or Moderna), and 127 SARS-CoV-2 negative patients. Serology results were compared to a cell based SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus (PSV) neutralizing antibodies assay. RESULTS: The Roche S-(spike) antibody and Diazyme neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) assays detected adaptive immune response in 100.0% and 90.1% of vaccinated individuals who received two-doses of vaccine (initial and booster), respectively. The Roche N-(nucleocapsid) antibody assay and Diazyme IgG assay did not detect adaptive immune response in vaccinated individuals. The Diazyme Nabs assay correlated with the PSV SARS-CoV-2 ID50 neutralization titers (R 2 = 0.70), while correlation of the Roche S-antibody assay was weaker (R 2 = 0.39). Median PSV SARS-CoV-2 ID50 titers more than doubled in vaccinated individuals who received two-doses of the Moderna vaccine (ID50: 597) compared to individuals that received a single dose (ID50: 284). CONCLUSIONS: The Roche S-antibody and Diazyme NAbs assays robustly detected adaptive immune responses in SARS-CoV-2 vaccinated individuals and SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals. The Diazyme NAbs assay strongly correlates with the PSV SARS-CoV-2 NAbs in vaccinated individuals. Understanding the reactivity of commercially available serology platforms is important when distinguishing vaccination response versus natural infection. SUMMARY: The Roche S (spike protein)-antibody and Diazyme neutralizing-antibodies (NAbs) assays were evaluated for their clinical utility in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 related adaptive immune responses by testing SARS-CoV-2 PCR-confirmed patients, SARS-CoV-2-vaccinated individuals, and SARS-CoV-2-negative individuals. Commercial serology results were compared to results generated using a cell-based SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus (PSV) NAbs assay and previously validated SARS-CoV-2 commercial serology assays (Roche N (nucleocapsid protein) antibody and Diazyme IgG). We demonstrate that the Roche S-antibody and Diazyme NAbs assays detected adaptive immune response in SARS-CoV-2 vaccinated individuals and the presence of SARS-CoV-2 PSV NAbs. The Roche S-antibody assay had an observed positive percent agreement (PPA) of 100% for individuals who received two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. By contrast, the Roche N assay and Diazyme IgG assay did not detect vaccine adaptive immune responses. Our findings also indicate that the Diazyme NAbs assay correlates strongly with the levels of SARS-CoV-2 ID50 neutralization titers using the PSV Nab assay in vaccinated individuals.

8.
Non-conventional in English | National Technical Information Service, Grey literature | ID: grc-753724

ABSTRACT

The recurrent zoonotic spillover of coronaviruses (CoVs) into the human population underscores the need for broadly active countermeasures. We employed a directed evolution approach to engineer three SARS-CoV-2 antibodies for enhanced neutralization breadth and potency. One of the affinity-matured variants, ADG-2, displays strong binding activity to a large panel of sarbecovirus receptor binding domains (RBDs) and neutralizes representative epidemic sarbecoviruses with high potency. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that ADG-2 employs a distinct angle of approach to recognize a highly conserved epitope overlapping the receptor binding site. In immunocompetent mouse models of SARS and COVID-19, prophylactic administration of ADG-2 provided complete protection against respiratory burden, viral replication in the lungs, and lung pathology. Altogether, ADG-2 represents a promising broad-spectrum therapeutic candidate against clade 1 sarbecoviruses.

9.
21st International Conference on Electronic Business: Corporate Resilience through Electronic Business in the Post-COVID Era, ICEB 2021 ; 21:522-530, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1728586

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 outbreak has affected the customers’ preferences and purchasing patterns as a result of the restrictive regulations taken by governments. Thus, service companies must adapt to this change by focusing on innovation as a solution to survive this crisis. Therefore, the basic objective of this study is the development of an integrated framework to investigate the impact of digital marketing and customization on service innovation in the context of the COVID-19 crisis. Data were collected from 53 Moroccan companies operating in the healthcare services industry. The data was analyzed, and the theoretical model was validated using Partial least square (PLS) and structural equation model (SEM). The findings show that: integration of digital marketing improves service innovation;customization of service offerings improves service innovation;customization has a higher impact on service innovation compared to digital marketing;and finally, customization has a significant effect on digital marketing. The contribution of this study is to emphasize the roles of customization and digital marketing, during the COVID-19 crisis, on companies’ service innovation so that they can differentiate their offered services and survive the current crisis. © 2021 International Consortium for Electronic Business. All rights reserved.

10.
25th International Conference of Hong Kong Society for Transportation Studies: Sustainable Mobility, HKSTS 2021 ; : 27-33, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1696202

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has been impacting on people's daily lives and travel behavior. Tiding over the peak of the pandemic, the world continues to be affected by the virus. To explore how travel behavior patterns are affected in the post-pandemic period, this paper conduct a questionnaire survey in China. The study finds a lasting influence of the pandemic. A reduction in travel frequency and the use of public transport can still be found. Factor analysis is used to investigate respondents' attitudes. Logistic regression models are then used to analyze the impact of these psychological factors, demographics on residents' travel behavior changes. The results show that the perception of social expectation has a negative effect on travel frequencies while the perception of the risk only affects how people travel in the post-pandemic period. The research findings assist in understanding people's behavior and developing policies for the post COVID-19 pandemic. © 2021 Proceedings of the 25th International Conference of Hong Kong Society for Transportation Studies, HKSTS 2021: Sustainable Mobility. All Rights Reserved.

11.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326636

ABSTRACT

Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) to coronaviruses (CoVs) are valuable in their own right as prophylactic and therapeutic reagents to treat diverse CoVs and, importantly, as templates for rational pan-CoV vaccine design. We recently described a bnAb, CC40.8, from a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-convalescent donor that exhibits broad reactivity with human beta-coronaviruses (beta-CoVs). Here, we showed that CC40.8 targets the conserved S2 stem-helix region of the coronavirus spike fusion machinery. We determined a crystal structure of CC40.8 Fab with a SARS-CoV-2 S2 stem-peptide at 1.6 A resolution and found that the peptide adopted a mainly helical structure. Conserved residues in beta-CoVs interacted with CC40.8 antibody, thereby providing a molecular basis for its broad reactivity. CC40.8 exhibited in vivo protective efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in two animal models. In both models, CC40.8-treated animals exhibited less weight loss and reduced lung viral titers compared to controls. Furthermore, we noted CC40.8-like bnAbs are relatively rare in human COVID-19 infection and therefore their elicitation may require rational structure-based vaccine design strategies. Overall, our study describes a target on beta-CoV spike proteins for protective antibodies that may facilitate the development of pan-beta-CoV vaccines. SUMMARY: A human mAb isolated from a COVID-19 donor defines a protective cross-neutralizing epitope for pan-beta-CoV vaccine design strategies.

12.
American Journal of the Medical Sciences ; 362(4):387-395, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1663165

ABSTRACT

Background: The severe epidemiologic situation of COVID-19 due to the limited capacity of healthcare systems makes it necessary to improve the hospital management and early identification and stratification of patients. The aim of the study was to explore hematological and biochemical parameters at admission to the hospital as novel early predictors for diagnosis with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among all suspected patients. Methods: This was a retrospective, multicenter, observational study. The clinical data of all suspected patients were analyzed. The suspected patients with negative RT-PCR results were included as the control group, and compared with confirmed patients. Receiver- operating characteristic (ROC) curves and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the hematological indexes. Results: In total, 326 confirmed COVID-19 patients and 116 control patients were included. The predictive ability of combinations of the hematological and biochemical parameters was significantly superior to that of a single parameter. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to neutrophil ratio index (ANRI) and the AST to monocyte ratio index (AMRI) were 0.791 and 0.812, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, an ANRI >= 6.03(OR: 3.26, 95% CI: 1.02-10.40, P=0.046) and an AMRI >= 36.32(OR: 3.64. 95% CI: 1.24-10.68, P=0.02) at admission were independent risk factors related to the occurrence of COVID-19. Conclusions: We found two novel predictors with promising predictive capacities for COVID-19 among all suspected patients: ANRI and AMRI. Our findings need to be confirmed in further studies.

13.
Nguyen, T.; Qureshi, M.; Martins, S.; Yamagami, H.; Qiu, Z.; Mansour, O.; Czlonkowska, A.; Abdalkader, M.; Sathya, A.; de Sousa, D. A.; Demeestere, J.; Mikulik, R.; Vanacker, P.; Siegler, J.; Korv, J.; Biller, J.; Liang, C.; Sangha, N.; Zha, A.; Czap, A.; Holmstedt, C.; Turan, T.; Grant, C.; Ntaios, G.; Malhotra, K.; Tayal, A.; Loochtan, A.; Mistry, E.; Alexandrov, A.; Huang, D.; Yaghi, S.; Raz, E.; Sheth, S.; Frankel, M.; Lamou, E. G. B.; Aref, H.; Elbassiouny, A.; Hassan, F.; Mustafa, W.; Menecie, T.; Shokri, H.; Roushdy, T.; Sarfo, F. S.; Alabi, T.; Arabambi, B.; Nwazor, E.; Sunmonu, T. A.; Wahab, K. W.; Mohammed, H. H.; Adebayo, P. B.; Riahi, A.; Ben Sassi, S.; Gwaunza, L.; Rahman, A.; Ai, Z. B.; Bai, F. H.; Duan, Z. H.; Hao, Y. G.; Huang, W. G.; Li, G. W.; Li, W.; Liu, G. Z.; Luo, J.; Shang, X. J.; Sui, Y.; Tian, L.; Wen, H. B.; Wu, B.; Yan, Y. Y.; Yuan, Z. Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W. L.; Zi, W. J.; Leung, T. K.; Sahakyan, D.; Chugh, C.; Huded, V.; Menon, B.; Pandian, J.; Sylaja, P. N.; Usman, F. S.; Farhoudi, M.; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, E.; Reznik, A.; Sivan-Hoffman, R.; Horev, A.; Ohara, N.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, R.; Doijiri, R.; Tokuda, N.; Yamada, T.; Terasaki, T.; Yazawa, Y.; Uwatoko, T.; Dembo, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sugiura, Y.; Miyashita, F.; Fukuda, H.; Miyake, K.; Shimbo, J.; Sugimura, Y.; Yagita, Y.; Takenobu, Y.; Matsumaru, Y.; Yamada, S.; Kono, R.; Kanamaru, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Todo, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Sonodda, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakahara, I.; Faizullina, K.; Kamenova, S.; Kondybayeva, A.; Zhanuzakov, M.; Baek, J. H.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Moon, J.; Park, H.; Seo, J. H.; Seo, K. D.; Young, C. J.; Ahdab, R.; Aziz, Z. A.; Zaidi, W. A. W.; Bin Basri, H.; Chung, L. W.; Husin, M.; Ibrahim, A. B.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Looi, I.; Tan, W. Y.; Yahya, Wnnw, Groppa, S.; Leahu, P.; Al Hashmi, A.; Imam, Y. Z.; Akhtar, N.; Oliver, C.; Kandyba, D.; Alhazzani, A.; Al-Jehani, H.; Tham, C. H.; Mamauag, M. J.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Chen, C. H.; Tang, S. C.; Churojana, A.; Aykac, O.; Ozdemir, A. O.; Hussain, S. I.; John, S.; Vu, H. L.; Tran, A. D.; Nguyen, H. H.; Thong, P. N.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T.; Gattringer, T.; Enzinger, C.; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M.; Bellante, F.; De Blauwe, S.; Van Hooren, G.; De Raedt, S.; Dusart, A.; Ligot, N.; Rutgers, M.; Yperzeele, L.; Alexiev, F.; Sakelarova, T.; Bedekovic, M. R.; Budincevic, H.; Cindric, I.; Hucika, Z.; Ozretic, D.; Saric, M. S.; Pfeifer, F.; Karpowicz, I.; Cernik, D.; Sramek, M.; Skoda, M.; Hlavacova, H.; Klecka, L.; Koutny, M.; Vaclavik, D.; Skoda, O.; Fiksa, J.; Hanelova, K.; Nevsimalova, M.; Rezek, R.; Prochazka, P.; Krejstova, G.; Neumann, J.; Vachova, M.; Brzezanski, H.; Hlinovsky, D.; Tenora, D.; Jura, R.; Jurak, L.; Novak, J.; Novak, A.; Topinka, Z.; Fibrich, P.; Sobolova, H.; Volny, O.; Christensen, H. K.; Drenck, N.; Iversen, H.; Simonsen, C.; Truelsen, T.; Wienecke, T.; Vibo, R.; Gross-Paju, K.; Toomsoo, T.; Antsov, K.; Caparros, F.; Cordonnier, C.; Dan, M.; Faucheux, J. M.; Mechtouff, L.; Eker, O.; Lesaine, E.; Ondze, B.; Pico, F.; Pop, R.; Rouanet, F.; Gubeladze, T.; Khinikadze, M.; Lobjanidze, N.; Tsiskaridze, A.; Nagel, S.; Ringleb, P. A.; Rosenkranz, M.; Schmidt, H.; Sedghi, A.; Siepmann, T.; Szabo, K.; Thomalla, G.; Palaiodimou, L.; Sagris, D.; Kargiotis, O.; Kaliaev, A.; Liebeskind, D.; Hassan, A.; Ranta, A.; Devlin, T.; Zaidat, O.; Castonguay, A.; Jovin, T.; Tsivgoulis, G.; Malik, A.; Ma, A.; Campbell, B.; Kleinig, T.; Wu, T.; Gongora, F.; Lavados, P.; Olavarria, V.; Lereis, V. P.; Corredor, A.; Barbosa, D. M.; Bayona, H.; Barrientos, J. D.; Patino, M.; Thijs, V.; Pirson, A.; Kristoffersen, E. S.; Patrik, M.; Fischer, U.; Bernava, G.; Renieri, L.; Strambo, D.; Ayo-Martin, O.; Montaner, J.; Karlinski, M.; Cruz-Culebras, A.; Luchowski, P.; Krastev, G.; Arenillas, J.; Gralla, J.; Mangiafico, S.; Blasco, J.; Fonseca, L.; Silva, M. L.; Kwan, J.; Banerjee, S.; Sangalli, D.; Frisullo, G.; Yavagal, D.; Uyttenboogaart, M.; Bandini, F.; Adami, A.; de Lecina, M. A.; Arribas, M. A. T.; Ferreira, P.; Cruz, V. T.; Nunes, A. P.; Marto, J. P.; Rodrigues, M.; Melo, T.; Saposnik, G.; Scott, C. A.; Shuaib, A.; Khosravani, H.; Fields, T.; Shoamanesh, A.; Catanese, L.; Mackey, A.; Hill, M.; Etherton, M.; Rost, N.; Lutsep, H.; Lee, V.; Mehta, B.; Pikula, A.; Simmons, M.; Macdougall, L.; Silver, B.; Khandelwal, P.; Morris, J.; Novakovic-White, R.; Ramakrishnan, P.; Shah, R.; Altschul, D.; Almufti, F.; Amaya, P.; Ordonez, C. E. R.; Lara, O.; Kadota, L. R.; Rivera, L. I. P.; Novarro, N.; Escobar, L. D.; Melgarejo, D.; Cardozo, A.; Blanco, A.; Zelaya, J. A.; Luraschi, A.; Gonzalez, V. H. N.; Almeida, J.; Conforto, A.; Almeida, M. S.; Silva, L. D.; Cuervo, D. L. M.; Zetola, V. F.; Martins, R. T.; Valler, L.; Giacomini, L. V.; Cardoso, F. B.; Sahathevan, R.; Hair, C.; Hankey, G.; Salazar, D.; Lima, F. O.; Mont'Alverne, F.; Moises, D.; Iman, B.; Magalhaes, P.; Longo, A.; Rebello, L.; Falup-Pecurariu, C.; Mazya, M.; Wisniewska, A.; Fryze, W.; Kazmierski, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Horoch, E.; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H.; Fudala, M.; Rogoziewicz, M.; Brola, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Kaczorowski, R.; Stepien, A.; Klivenyi, P.; Szapary, L.; van den Wijngaard, I.; Demchuk, A.; Abraham, M.; Alvarado-Ortiz, T.; Kaushal, R.; Ortega-Gutierrez, S.; Farooqui, M.; Bach, I.; Badruddin, A.; Barazangi, N.; Nguyen, C.; Brereton, C.; Choi, J. H.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Desai, K.; Doss, V.; Edgell, R.; Linares, G.; Frei, D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Gandhi, D.; Chaudhry, S.; Choe, H.; Grigoryan, M.; Gupta, R.; Helenius, J.; Voetsch, B.; Khwaja, A.; Khoury, N.; Kim, B. S.; Kleindorfer, D.; McDermott, M.; Koyfman, F.; Leung, L.; Linfante, I.; Male, S.; Masoud, H.; Min, J. Y.; Mittal, M.; Multani, S.; Nahab, F.; Nalleballe, K.; Rahangdale, R.; Rafael, J.; Rothstein, A.; Ruland, S.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A.; Starosciak, A.; Strasser, S.; Szeder, V.; Teleb, M.; Tsai, J.; Mohammaden, M.; Pineda-Franks, C.; Asyraf, W.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Tarkanyi, G.; Horev, A.; Haussen, D.; Balaguera, O.; Vasquez, A. R.; Nogueira, R..
Neurology ; 96(15):42, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576349
14.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-294914

ABSTRACT

The increasing prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 variants with spike mutations has raised concerns owing to higher transmission rates, disease severity, and escape from neutralizing antibodies. Rapid and accurate detection of SARS-CoV-2 variants provides crucial information concerning the outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 variants and possible lines of transmission. This information is vital for infection prevention and control. We used a Cas12a-based RT-PCR combined with CRISPR on-site rapid detection system (RT-CORDS) platform to detect the key mutations in SARS-COV-2 variants, such as 69/70 deletion, N501Y, and D614G. We used type-specific CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to identify wild-type (crRNA-W) and mutant (crRNA-M) sequences of SARS-CoV-2. We successfully differentiated mutant variants from wild-type SARS-CoV-2 with a sensitivity of $10

15.
Chinese Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics ; 26(10):1127-1145, 2021.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1513185

ABSTRACT

AIM: The main chemical components of Yufang Fangji II (Hubei Fang) of COVID-19 were studied systematically and combined with network pharmacology to provide a reference for the study of its effective substances. METHODS: Ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF/MS) was applied to identify the absorbed components of the prescription in rat plasma. TCMSP database and Swiss Target Prediction data platform were used to predict the target of the identified blood components, and network visualization software Cytoscape 3.7.2 was used draw the association network diagram, and GO enrichment analysis and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis were conducted for the key targets. With the help of CB-Dock online molecular docking platform, the molecular docking of key targets and blood entering compounds was carried out, and the docking combination with good affinity value was displayed by ligplot software to verify the preventive effect of Yufang Fangji II on COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 52 chemical components identified in the prescription, in which 13 components were absorbed in the rat plasma as the prototype, and they were from Astragalus membranaceus, Atractylodes macrocephala, Saposhnikoviae Radix, Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, and Citri Reticulatae Pericarpium, respectively. These compounds were recognized to act on 17 core targets, including mapk3, TNF and other targets related to inflammation, MPO and other targets related to oxidative stress, VEGFR, KDR and other targets related to vascular endothelium. The results of molecular docking showed that the absorbed components had good binding activity with the key targets. CONCLUSION: Compounds in Yufang Fangji II are involved in regulating inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular and cellular physiological activities, which have preventive effects on COVID-19 through regulating IL-17, PI3K Akt, MAPK and other pathways.

16.
Hepatology ; 74(SUPPL 1):849A, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1508755

ABSTRACT

Background: Liver transplantation (LT) activities during the COVID-19 pandemic have been curtailed in many countries which has led to increased percentage of waitlist deaths. The impact of various policies restricting LT on outcomes of patients on the LT waitlist is unclear. This study aims to model effects of various scenarios and duration of LT disruption on outcomes. Methods: Using nationwide data from Hong Kong and Singapore of 571 patients between January 2016 and May 2020, we utilized a continuous time Markov chains model approach to evaluate the three following outcomes: (a) overall survival, (b) proportion of waitlist dropout in HCC patients, and (c) proportion of patients that developed acuteon-chronic liver failure (ACLF) while on the LT waitlist under the five scenarios. The five scenarios were: (1) no limitation to LT (both deceased donor liver transplant [DDLT] and living donor liver transplant [LDLT]), (2) no limitation to DDLT, only urgent (acute liver failure [ALF] or ACLF) LDLT allowed, (3) only urgent LT (DDLT and LDLT) allowed, (4) only DDLT, no LDLT allowed and (5) complete cessation of LT. For each scenario, varying periods of 1-, 3-, 6- and 12-month duration of disruption were simulated. Results: With complete cessation of LT, the projected 1-year overall survival (OS) decreased by 3.6%, 10.51% and 19.21% for a 1-, 3- and 6-month disruption respectively when compared to no limitation to LT, while 5-year OS decreased by 5.3%, 15.81%, and 31.11% respectively. When only urgent LT was allowed, the projected 1-year OS decreased by a similar proportion: 3.1%, 8.41% and 15.20% respectively. When only DDLT was allowed to take place, the 1-year projected OS decreased by a smaller proportion - 1.9%, 6.30% and 10.79% for a 1-, 3-, 6-month disruption respectively. When DDLT and only urgent LDLT were allowed, 1-year projected OS was similar to when only DDLT was allowed, at 1.2%, 5.1% and 8.85% for a 1-, 3- and 6-month disruption respectively (Figure 1A). Complete cessation of LT activities resulted in an increased projected incidence of ACLF at 1-year by 17.6%, 49.1% and 95.5%, as well as an increase in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) dropout resulting in delisting at 1-year by 31.8%, 107.96% and 176.06% for a 1-, 3- and 6- month disruption respectively (Figure 1B). When only urgent LT was allowed, HCC dropout and ACLF incidence were comparable to the rates seen in the scenario of complete LT cessation. Conclusion: A short and wide-ranging disruption to LT results in better outcomes compared with a longer duration of partial restrictions. Findings from our study provide useful guidance for LT units worldwide in navigating the peaks and troughs of COVID-19 surges and highlight the impact of LT disruption on waitlisted patients during this prolonged pandemic. Once the peak of the COVID-19 wave has passed, DDLT at minimum should be resumed as soon as possible.

17.
Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine ; 21(4):373-375, 2021.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1449167

ABSTRACT

Traditional Chinese medicine has been used for the treatment of many diseases including acute infections often associated with public health emergencies for thousands of years. However, clinical evidence supporting the use of these treatments is insufficient, and the mechanism for using Chinese medicine therapy in the public health setting has not been fully established. In this report, the Evidence-based Traditional and Integrative Chinese medicine Responding to Public Health Emergencies Working Group proposed five recommendations to facilitate the inclusion of Chinese medicine as part of our responses to public health emergencies. It is expected that the Working Group’s proposals may promote the investigation and practice of Chinese Medicine in public health settings.

18.
Nguyen, T.; Qureshi, M.; Martins, S.; Yamagami, H.; Qiu, Z.; Mansour, O.; Czlonkowska, A.; Abdalkader, M.; Sathya, A.; Sousa, D. A.; Demeester, J.; Mikulik, R.; Vanacker, P.; Siegler, J.; Korv, J.; Biller, J.; Liang, C.; Sangha, N.; Zha, A.; Czap, A.; Holmstedt, C.; Turan, T.; Grant, C.; Ntaios, G.; Malhotra, K.; Tayal, A.; Loochtan, A.; Mistry, E.; Alexandrov, A.; Huang, D.; Yaghi, S.; Raz, E.; Sheth, S.; Frankel, M.; Lamou, E. G. B.; Aref, H.; Elbassiouny, A.; Hassan, F.; Mustafa, W.; Menecie, T.; Shokri, H.; Roushdy, T.; Sarfo, F. S.; Alabi, T.; Arabambi, B.; Nwazor, E.; Sunmonu, T. A.; Wahab, K. W.; Mohammed, H. H.; Adebayo, P. B.; Riahi, A.; Sassi, S. B.; Gwaunza, L.; Rahman, A.; Ai, Z.; Bai, F.; Duan, Z.; Hao, Y.; Huang, W.; Li, G.; Li, W.; Liu, G.; Luo, J.; Shang, X.; Sui, Y.; Tian, L.; Wen, H.; Wu, B.; Yan, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Zi, W.; Leung, T. K.; Sahakyan, D.; Chugh, C.; Huded, V.; Menon, B.; Pandian, J.; Sylaja, P. N.; Usman, F. S.; Farhoudi, M.; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, E.; Reznik, A.; Sivan-Hoffman, R.; Horev, A.; Ohara, N.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, R.; Doijiri, R.; Kuda, N.; Yamada, T.; Terasaki, T.; Yazawa, Y.; Uwatoko, T.; Dembo, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sugiura, Y.; Miyashita, F.; Fukuda, H.; Miyake, K.; Shimbo, J.; Sugimura, Y.; Yagita, Y.; Takenobu, Y.; Matsumaru, Y.; Yamada, S.; Kono, R.; Kanamaru, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Todo, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Sonodda, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakahara, I.; Faizullina, K.; Kamenova, S.; Kondybayev, A.; Zhanuzakov, M.; Baek, J. H.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Moon, J.; Park, H.; Seo, J. H.; Seo, K. D.; Young, C. J.; Ahdab, R.; Aziz, Z. A.; Zaidi, W. A. W.; Basr, H. B.; Chung, L. W.; Husin, M.; Ibrahim, A. B.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Looi, I.; Tan, W. Y.; Yahya, W. N. W.; Groppa, S.; Leahu, P.; Hashmi, A. A.; Imam, Y. Z.; Akhtar, N.; Oliver, C.; Kandyba, D.; Alhazzani, A.; Al-Jehani, H.; Tham, C. H.; Mamauag, M. J.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Chen, C. H.; Tang, S. C.; Churojana, A.; Aykaç, O.; Özdemir, A.; Hussain, S. I.; John, S.; Vu, H. L.; Tran, A. D.; Nguyen, H. H.; Thong, P. N.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T.; Gattringer, T.; Enzinger, C.; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M.; Bellante, F.; Deblauwe, S.; Hooren, G. V.; Raedt, S. D.; Dusart, A.; Ligot, N.; Rutgers, M.; Yperzeele, L.; Alexiev, F.; Sakelarova, T.; Bedekovic, M.; Budincevic, H.; Cindric, I.; Hucika, Z.; Ozretic, D.; Saric, M. S.; Pfeifer, F.; Karpowicz, I.; Cernik, D.; Sramek, M.; Skoda, M.; Hlavacova, H.; Klecka, L.; Koutny, M.; Skoda, O.; Fiksa, J.; Hanelova, K.; Nevsimalova, M.; Rezek, R.; Prochazka, P.; Krejstova, G.; Neumann, J.; Vachova, M.; Brzezanski, H.; Hlinovsky, D.; Tenora, D.; Jura, R.; Jurak, L.; Novak, J.; Novak, A.; Topinka, Z.; Fibrich, P.; Sobolova, H.; Volny, O.; Christensen, H. K.; Drenck, N.; Iversen, H.; Simonsen, C.; Truelsen, T.; Wienecke, T.; Vibo, R.; Gross-Paju, K.; Toomsoo, T.; Antsov, K.; Caparros, F.; Cordonnier, C.; Dan, M.; Faucheux, J. M.; Mechtouff, L.; Eker, O.; Lesaine, E.; Pico, F.; Pop, R.; Rouanet, F.; Gubeladze, T.; Khinikadze, M.; Lobjanidze, N.; Tsiskaridze, A.; Nagel, S.; Arthurringleb, P.; Rosenkranz, M.; Schmidt, H.; Sedghi, A.; Siepmann, T.; Szabo, K.; Thomalla, G.; Palaiodimou, L.; Sagris, D.; Kargiotis, O.; Kaliaev, A.; Liebeskind, D.; Hassan, A.; Ranta, A.; Devlin, T.; Zaidat, O.; Castonguay, A.; Jovin, T.; Tsivgoulis, G.; Malik, A.; Ma, A.; Campbel, B.; Kleinig, T.; Wu, T.; Gongora, F.; Lavados, P.; Olavarria, V.; Lereis, V. P.; Corredor, A.; Barbosa, D. M.; Bayona, H.; Barrientos, J. D.; Patino, M.; Thijs, V.; Pirson, A.; Kristoffersen, E. S.; Patrik, M.; Fischer, U.; Bernava, G.; Renieri, L.; Strambo, D.; Ayo-Martin, O.; Montaner, J.; Karlinski, M.; Cruz-Culebras, A.; Luchowski, P.; Krastev, G.; Arenillas, J.; Gralla, J.; Mangiafico, S.; Blasco, J.; Fonseca, L.; Silva, M. L.; Kwan, J.; Banerjee, S.; Sangalli, D.; Frisullo, G.; Yavagal, D.; Uyttenboogaart, M.; Bandini, F.; Adami, A.; Lecina, M. A. D.; Arribas, M. A. T.; Ferreira, P.; Cruz, V. T.; Nunes, A. P.; Marto, J. P.; Rodrigues, M.; Melo, T.; Saposnik, G.; Scott, C. A.; Shuaib, A.; Khosravani, H.; Fields, T.; Shoamanesh, A.; Catanese, L.; MacKey, A.; Hill, M.; Etherton, M.; Rost, N.; Lutsep, H.; Lee, V.; Mehta, B.; Pikula, A.; Simmons, M.; MacDougall, L.; Silver, B.; Khandelwal, P.; Morris, J.; Novakovic-White, R.; Shah, R.; Altschul, D.; Almufti, F.; Amaya, P.; Ordonez, C. E. R.; Lara, O.; Kadota, L. R.; Rivera, L. I.; Novarro, N.; Escobar, L. D.; Melgarejo, D.; Cardozo, A.; Blanco, A.; Zelaya, J. A.; Luraschi, A.; Gonzalez, V. H.; Almeida, J.; Conforto, A.; Almeida, M. S.; Silva, L. D. D.; Cuervo, D. L. M.; Zetola, V. F.; Martins, R. T.; Valler, L.; Giacomini, L. V.; Buchdidcardoso, F.; Sahathevan, R.; Hair, C.; Hankey, G.; Salazar, D.; Lima, F. O.; Mont'alverne, F.; Iman, D. M. B.; Longo, A.; Rebello, L.; Falup-Pecurariu, C.; Mazya, M.; Wisniewska, A.; Fryze, W.; Kazmierski, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Horoch, E.; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H.; Fudala, M.; Goziewicz, M.; Brola, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Kaczorowski, R.; Stepien, A.; Klivenyi, P.; Szapary, L.; Wijngaard, I. V. D.; Demchuk, A.; Abraham, M.; Alvarado-Ortiz, T.; Kaushal, R.; Ortega-Gutierrez, S.; Farooqui, M.; Bach, I.; Badruddin, A.; Barazangi, N.; Nguyen, C.; Brereton, C.; Choi, J. H.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Desai, K.; Doss, V.; Edgell, R.; Linares, G.; Frei, D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Gandhi, D.; Chaudhry, S.; Choe, H.; Grigoryan, M.; Gupta, R.; Helenius, J.; Voetsch, B.; Khwaja, A.; Khoury, N.; Kim, B. S.; Kleindorfer, D.; McDermott, M.; Koyfman, F.; Leung, L.; Linfante, I.; Male, S.; Masoud, H.; Min, J.; Mittal, M.; Multani, S.; Nahab, F.; Nalleballe, K.; Rahangdale, R.; Rafael, J.; Rothstein, A.; Ruland, S.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A.; Starosciak, A.; Strasser, S.; Szeder, V.; Teleb, M.; Tsai, J.; Mohammaden, M.; Pineda-Franks, C.; Asyraf, W.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Tarkanyi, A.; Haussen, D.; Balaguera, O.; Rodriguezvasquez, A.; Nogueira, R..
Neurology ; 96(15 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1407898

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objectives of this study were to measure the global impact of the pandemic on the volumes for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), IVT transfers, and stroke hospitalizations over 4 months at the height of the pandemic (March 1 to June 30, 2020) compared with two control 4-month periods. Background: The COVID-19 pandemic led to widespread repercussions on the delivery of health care worldwide. Design/Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective study across 6 continents, 70 countries, and 457 stroke centers. Diagnoses were identified by ICD-10 codes and/or classifications in stroke center databases. Results: There were 91,373 stroke admissions in the 4 months immediately before compared to 80,894 admissions during the pandemic months, representing an 11.5% (95%CI,-11.7 to-11.3, p<0.0001) decline. There were 13,334 IVT therapies in the 4 months preceding compared to 11,570 procedures during the pandemic, representing a 13.2% (95%CI,-13.8 to-12.7, p<0.0001) drop. Interfacility IVT transfers decreased from 1,337 to 1,178, or an 11.9% decrease (95%CI,-13.7 to-10.3, p=0.001). There were greater declines in primary compared to comprehensive stroke centers (CSC) for stroke hospitalizations (-17.3% vs-10.3%, p<0.0001) and IVT (-15.5% vs-12.6%, p=0.0001). Recovery of stroke hospitalization volume (9.5%, 95%CI 9.2-9.8, p<0.0001) was noted over the two later (May, June) versus the two earlier (March, April) months of the pandemic, with greater recovery in hospitals with lower COVID-19 hospitalization volume, high volume stroke center, and CSC. There was a 1.48% stroke rate across 119,967 COVID-19 hospitalizations. SARS-CoV-2 infection was noted in 3.3% (1,722/52,026) of all stroke admissions. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of stroke hospitalizations, IVT, and interfacility IVT transfers. Primary stroke centers and centers with higher COVID19 inpatient volumes experienced steeper declines. Recovery of stroke hospitalization was noted in the later pandemic months, with greater recovery in hospitals with lower COVID-19 hospitalizations, high volume stroke centers, and CSCs.

19.
Current Bioinformatics ; 16(6):799-806, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1365492

ABSTRACT

Aim: Both bacterial infection and viral infection involve a large number of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between a pathogen and its target host. Background: So far, many computational methods have focused on predicting PPIs within the same species rather than PPIs across different species. Methods: From the extensive analysis of PPIs between Yersinia pestis bacteria and humans, we recently discovered an interesting relation;a linear relation between amino acid composition and sequence length was observed in many proteins involved in PPIs. We have built a support vector machine (SVM) model, which predicts PPIs between human and bacteria using two feature types derived from the relation. The two feature types used in the SVM are the amino acid composition group (AACG) and the difference in amino acid composition between host and pathogen proteins. Results: The SVM model achieved high performance in predicting bacteria-human PPIs. The model showed an accuracy of 96%, sensitivity of 94%, and specificity of 98% in predicting PPIs between humans and Yersinia pestis, in which there is a strong relation between amino acid composition and sequence length. The SVM model was also tested in predicting PPIs between human and viruses, which include Ebola, HCV, and SARS-CoV-2, and showed a good performance. Conclusion: The feature types identified in our study are simple yet powerful in predicting pathogenhuman PPIs. Although preliminary, our method will be useful for finding unknown target host proteins or pathogen proteins and designing in vitro or in vivo experiments.

20.
Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1331351

ABSTRACT

We analyze lending by traditional as well as FinTech lenders during COVID-19. Comparing samples of FinTech and bank loan records across the outbreak, we find that FinTech companies are more likely to expand credit access to new and financially constrained borrowers after the start of the pandemic. However, this increased credit provision may not be sustainable;the delinquency rate of FinTech loans triples after the outbreak, but there is no significant change in the delinquency of bank loans. Borrowers holding both loan types prioritize the payment of bank loans. These results shed light on the benefits provided by shadow banking in a crisis and hint at the potential fragility of such institutions when delinquency rates spike. © 2021 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

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