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1.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 582620, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256382

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of the influenza A (H1N1) and SARS-CoV-2 virus on the development of autoimmune hepatitis has not been described previously. Methods: In this case series, we evaluated the dynamic changes in liver function of three patients with autoimmune hepatitis who presented with viral infection (two with the H1N1 and one with the SARS-CoV-2 virus) during the recent COVID-19 outbreak. Result: Patient 1 was a 68-year-old woman with a history of hepatitis of unknown origin before being infected with the H1N1 virus. Autoimmune hepatitis with an exacerbation of liver injury was diagnosed during the infection. Patient 2 was a 48-year-old woman with pre-existing autoimmune hepatitis. Despite being on immunosuppressant therapy (using glucocorticoids), liver injury recurred with elevated total bilirubin and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels post H1N1 infection. Patient 3 was a 61-year-old woman with probable autoimmune hepatitis. Liver injury recurred with a flare in alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase levels post SARS-CoV-2 infection, in spite of the patient being on liver protection therapy (using ursodeoxycholic acid). Conclusion: The case series raises the possibility that COVID-19 or influenza induced pneumonia triggers the progression of autoimmune hepatitis.

2.
Cancer Manag Res ; 12: 12927-12944, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999911

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the quality of systematic reviews/meta-analyses (SR/MAs) on alternative exercise traditions in cancer care. Methods: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Ovid, EBSCOhost, WanFang Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and VIP Database were searched from their inception to June 30, 2020. The search used a combination of subject words and free words. The search terms included "Tai Chi," "Qigong," "Baduanjin," "Yoga," "Pilates," "Cancer," "Meta-analysis," and "Systematic review." Two researchers independently performed literature screening and data extraction and used AMSTAR scale and PRISMA statement to evaluate the methodology and the quality of the evidence. Results: A total of 26 SR/MAs were included. The AMSTAR scale score was 5-10 points, with an average of 7.46±1.33 points. Overall, the methodological quality was considered to be moderate. The PRISMA list score was 13-24 points, with an average of 19.19±2.86 points. Among the papers evaluated, eight reports were relatively complete. A total of 15 papers indicated certain defects. A total of three papers showed relatively serious information defects. Conclusion: Relative to the control group, alternative exercise traditions may be effective in improving the quality of life, anxiety, depression, distress, and fatigue of cancer patients. However, they may not necessarily improve patients' sleep outcome, body mass index, and pain. During convalescence, cancer patients can be encouraged to start engaging in physical exercise, and professionals can develop appropriate exercise alternatives to ensure the expected effect of exercise while ensuring the safety of patients. The methodological quality of the systematic evaluations of the intervention effects of alternative exercise traditions on cancer patients is not satisfactory. Hence, focus should be directed to the improvement of the preliminary design scheme, publication status, literature retrieval, conflict of interest, and other aspects.

4.
Front Immunol ; 11: 2063, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-868947

ABSTRACT

Background: Cases of excessive neutrophil counts in the blood in severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients have drawn significant attention. Neutrophil infiltration was also noted on the pathological findings from autopsies. It is urgent to clarify the pathogenesis of neutrophils leading to severe pneumonia in COVID-19. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 55 COVID-19 patients classified as mild (n = 22), moderate (n = 25), and severe (n = 8) according to the Guidelines released by the National Health Commission of China. Trends relating leukocyte counts and lungs examined by chest CT scan were quantified by Bayesian inference. Transcriptional signatures of host immune cells of four COVID19 patients were analyzed by RNA sequencing of lung specimens and BALF. Results: Neutrophilia occurred in 6 of 8 severe patients at 7-19 days after symptom onset, coinciding with lesion progression. Increasing neutrophil counts paralleled lesion CT values (slope: 0.8 and 0.3-1.2), reflecting neutrophilia-induced lung injury in severe patients. Transcriptome analysis revealed that neutrophil activation was correlated with 17 neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-associated genes in COVID-19 patients, which was related to innate immunity and interacted with T/NK/B cells, as supported by a protein-protein interaction network analysis. Conclusion: Excessive neutrophils and associated NETs could explain the pathogenesis of lung injury in COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/genetics , Neutrophil Activation/genetics , Neutrophils/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , Aged , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Lung Injury/immunology , Lung Injury/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophil Infiltration/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Interaction Maps/immunology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome
6.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1158

ABSTRACT

Background: A critical issue is to identify COVID-19 patients early who develosevere pneumonia. Understanding the relationshiof the laboratory parameters an

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