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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 12596, 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956423

ABSTRACT

Low power microwave can effectively deactivate influenza type A virus through the nonthermal structure-resonant energy transfer effect, at a frequency matching the confined-acoustic dipolar mode frequency of the virus. Currently, aerosol is considered the major route for SARS-CoV-2 transmission. For the potential microwave-based sterilization, the microwave-resonant frequency of SARS-CoV-2 must be unraveled. Here we report a microwave absorption spectroscopy study of the SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-229E viruses through devising a coplanar-waveguide-based sensor. Noticeable microwave absorption can be observed, while we identified the resonant frequencies of the 1st and 2nd dipolar modes of SARS-CoV-2 virus as 4 and 7.5 GHz respectively. We further found that the resonant frequencies are invariant to the virus titer, and we also studied the microwave absorption of HCoV-229E in weak acidity medium to simulate the common pH value in fluid secretion. Our results suggest the possible radiation frequency for the recently proposed microwave sterilization devices to inactivate SARS-CoV-2 virus through a nonthermal mechanism so as to control the disease transmission in the post-pandemic era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Humans , Microwaves , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Zhongguo Yufang Shouyi Xuebao / Chinese Journal of Preventive Veterinary Medicine ; 43(1):83-87, 2021.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1140722

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19 (Corona virus disease 2019) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2) poses a huge threat to human health worldwide since December 2019. In order to study the correlation betweenSARS-CoV-2 and porcine coronavirus, the phylogenetic analysis of spike (S) protein amino acid sequence of human coronavirusand porcine coronavirus, the similarity analysis of the spatial structure of S1 subunit receptor binding domain (RBD) of S proteinwere conducted by bioinformatics analysis, moreover, the double- antigen sandwich ELISA kit was utilized to detect the SARSCoV-2 antibody in common porcine coronavirus positive serum. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed a low identity of Sprotein amino acid sequence between SARS-CoV-2 and porcine coronavirus, indicating a long distance of genetic evolution, andthe S1 subunit RBD spatial structure showed huge differences, meanwhile, all of the porcine coronavirus positive serum samplestested were negative of SARS-CoV-2 antibody. Our data suggested the huge differences in gene and protein level between SARS-CoV-2 and porcine coronavirus, which indicating that SARS-CoV-2 shows a minimal risk of achieving cross-species transmission byinfecting pigs to threaten public health security. This research provides a basis for studying COVID-19 pathogen traceability andbiosafety analysis of cross-species transmission.

3.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 102(6): 1208-1209, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-107974

ABSTRACT

The early shortage of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) tests in the United States led many hospitals to first screen for common respiratory pathogens, and only if this screen was negative to proceed with COVID-19 testing. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) coinfection with group A Streptococcus. The initial testing strategy resulted in delays in both diagnosis and implementation of appropriate precautions. Underlined is the importance of testing for both SARS-CoV-2 and other common respiratory pathogens during the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Chronic Pain/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Hypertension/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Streptococcal Infections/diagnostic imaging , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Chicago , Chronic Pain/immunology , Chronic Pain/pathology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Hypertension/immunology , Hypertension/pathology , Hypertension/therapy , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Streptococcal Infections/immunology , Streptococcal Infections/pathology , Streptococcal Infections/therapy , Streptococcus pyogenes/drug effects , Streptococcus pyogenes/isolation & purification , Streptococcus pyogenes/pathogenicity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
5.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 67(4): 1745-1749, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-71843

ABSTRACT

The pandemic SARS-CoV-2 has been reported in 123 countries with more than 5,000 patients died from it. However, the original and intermediate hosts of the virus remain unknown. In this study, 1,914 serum samples from 35 animal species were used for detection of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies using double-antigen sandwich ELISA after validating its specificity and sensitivity. The results showed that no SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies were detected in above samples which excluded the possibility of 35 animal species as intermediate host for SARS-CoV-2. More importantly, companion animals including pet dogs (including one dog the SARS-CoV-2 patient kept and two dogs which had close contact with it) and cats, street dogs and cats also showed serological negative to SARS-CoV-2, which relieved the public concerns for the pets as SARS-CoV-2 carriers.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Animals , Animals, Wild , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cats , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Dogs , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/veterinary , Pets , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Med Virol ; 92(6): 577-583, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-32888

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical data, discharge rate, and fatality rate of COVID-19 patients for clinical help. The clinical data of COVID-19 patients from December 2019 to February 2020 were retrieved from four databases. We statistically analyzed the clinical symptoms and laboratory results of COVID-19 patients and explained the discharge rate and fatality rate with a single-arm meta-analysis. The available data of 1994 patients in 10 literatures were included in our study. The main clinical symptoms of COVID-19 patients were fever (88.5%), cough (68.6%), myalgia or fatigue (35.8%), expectoration (28.2%), and dyspnea (21.9%). Minor symptoms include headache or dizziness (12.1%), diarrhea (4.8%), nausea and vomiting (3.9%). The results of the laboratory showed that the lymphocytopenia (64.5%), increase of C-reactive protein (44.3%), increase of lactic dehydrogenase (28.3%), and leukocytopenia (29.4%) were more common. The results of single-arm meta-analysis showed that the male took a larger percentage in the gender distribution of COVID-19 patients 60% (95% CI [0.54, 0.65]), the discharge rate of COVID-19 patients was 52% (95% CI [0.34,0.70]), and the fatality rate was 5% (95% CI [0.01,0.11]).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pandemics , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Cough/blood , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/blood , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/blood , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Incidence , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Survival Analysis
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