Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325338

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze chest thin-section high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings for 32 patients with Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and clarify the correlation between CT data and laboratory results. 30 patients presented with abnormal initial CT scans. Of 30 patients, COVID-19 showed the involvement of bilateral lungs in 24 (80%), involvement of more than two lobes in 24 (80%), ground-glass opacities without consolidation in 27 (90%), ground-glass opacities with consolidation in 23 (76.7%), opacities with irregular intralobular lines in 26 (86.7%), opacities with round morphology in 25 (83.3%), and peripheral distribution in 30 (100%). Pleural effusion or mediastinal lymphadenopathy was relatively rare manifestations. Rapidly progression of the disease demonstrated by increasing number and range of ground glass opacities and appearance of consolidations at follow-up CT images in two patients. The CT lung severity score and No. of lobes involved were negatively correlated with lymphocyte count( r =-0.363, P =0.041;r =-0.367, P =0.039, respectively). Chest HRCT of COVID-19 predominantly manifests multiple, round, ground glass opacities with irregular intralobular lines, and peripheral distribution of bilateral lungs. HRCT is a potential tool for early screening, assessing progress, and predicting disease severity of COVID-19.Authors Jie Zhou and Jie Cao contributed equally to this work and are co-first authors.

2.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk ; 2021 Dec 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in acute COVID-19 and those with hematologic malignancy (HM) may be at an even higher risk. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with history of HM and acute COVID-19 to evaluate thrombotic and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 were identified by positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test. Our primary endpoints were rate of VTE and CVA in patients with HM compared to the general population (GP). Secondary outcomes included composite thrombotic events (CVA + VTE), COVID-19 fatality, respiratory support, ICU admission rates, and length of ICU stay RESULTS: A total of 833 patients were evaluated, 709 in the GP cohort, 124 patients in the HM cohort. CVA was more prevalent in the HM cohort (5.4% vs. 1.6%, P = .011). Rates of VTE were numerically higher for the HM cohort (8.0% vs. 3.6%, P = .069). The composite thrombotic rate was increased in the HM cohort (13.4% vs. 5.2%, P = .005). Patients with HM had a higher inpatient fatality rate (35.5% vs. 11.3%, P < .001), required more respiratory support (74.6% vs. 46.5%, P < .001) and had a higher rate of ICU admission (31.9% vs. 12.1%, P = .001). CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrated an increased rate of composite thrombotic (CVA + VTE) outcomes, indicating HM patients with acute COVID-19 are at increased risk of thrombosis. Irrespective of disease status, HM patients also have significantly increased need for intensive care, respiratory support, and have higher fatality rates.

3.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 8: 710946, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399130

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate the impact of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) on the inflammatory response and viral clearance in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Methods: We included 229 patients with confirmed COVID-19 in a multicenter, retrospective cohort study. Propensity score matching at a ratio of 1:3 was introduced to eliminate potential confounders. Patients were assigned to the ACEI/ARB group (n = 38) or control group (n = 114) according to whether they were current users of medication. Results: Compared to the control group, patients in the ACEI/ARB group had lower levels of plasma IL-1ß [(6.20 ± 0.38) vs. (9.30 ± 0.31) pg/ml, P = 0.020], IL-6 [(31.86 ± 4.07) vs. (48.47 ± 3.11) pg/ml, P = 0.041], IL-8 [(34.66 ± 1.90) vs. (47.93 ± 1.21) pg/ml, P = 0.027], and TNF-α [(6.11 ± 0.88) vs. (12.73 ± 0.26) pg/ml, P < 0.01]. Current users of ACEIs/ARBs seemed to have a higher rate of vasoconstrictive agents (20 vs. 6%, P < 0.01) than the control group. Decreased lymphocyte counts [(0.76 ± 0.31) vs. (1.01 ± 0.45)*109/L, P = 0.027] and elevated plasma levels of IL-10 [(9.91 ± 0.42) vs. (5.26 ± 0.21) pg/ml, P = 0.012] were also important discoveries in the ACEI/ARB group. Patients in the ACEI/ARB group had a prolonged duration of viral shedding [(24 ± 5) vs. (18 ± 5) days, P = 0.034] and increased length of hospitalization [(24 ± 11) vs. (15 ± 7) days, P < 0.01]. These trends were similar in patients with hypertension. Conclusions: Our findings did not provide evidence for a significant association between ACEI/ARB treatment and COVID-19 mortality. ACEIs/ARBs might decrease proinflammatory cytokines, but antiviral treatment should be enforced, and hemodynamics should be monitored closely. Since the limited influence on the ACEI/ARB treatment, they should not be withdrawn if there was no formal contraindication.

4.
Matter ; 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1185157

ABSTRACT

Summary Viral infections remain one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide, responsible for millions of deaths every year. The application of antiviral drugs, along with symptomatic treatment, is the primary modality of clinical antiviral therapy. Nevertheless, the severe side effects of antiviral drugs, such as gastrointestinal, hepatic, renal, and/or hematopoietic damages, can affect compliance and may even interrupt treatment. Moreover, drug resistance due to frequent viral mutations and single antiviral mechanisms often leads to therapeutic failure. The introduction of biomaterials into antiviral therapy provides distinct advantages and unique mechanisms. Antiviral biomaterials work in various ways, such as physical adsorption of viruses, binding to viruses as entry inhibitors, induction of irreversible viral deformation, interference with viral nucleic acid replication, and blockage of viral release from infected cells, among others. This review offers an overview of state-of-the-art advances in antiviral biomaterials featuring different mechanisms and discusses their challenges and opportunities in clinical translations.

5.
Geoforum ; 116: 149-152, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741221

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we coin the term "crypto place" to describe an emerging type of virtual place on the blockchain. Using an encrypted monument that was built to memorialize Dr. Wenliang Li, one of the whistleblowers of China's coronavirus outbreak, we extensively investigate three definitive dimensions of crypto place in terms of decentralized location, immutable locales and transaction-based sense of place. We then reflect upon the complicated social implications of blockchain technology much beyond purely serving as an alternative cryptocurrency, and further examine how place information is stored, disseminated, and incentivized on blockchain. Through this paper, we investigate the relevance of blockchain to geography studies and discuss how it may enrich the concept of place in today's data-intensive and decentralized world.

6.
Kidney Blood Press Res ; 45(4): 612-622, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680430

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory viral infections are frequency accompanied by multiple organ dysfunction, including acute kidney injury (AKI). In December 2019, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak began in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, and rapidly spread worldwide. While diffuse alveolar damage and acute respiratory failure are the main features of COVID-19, other organs may be involved, and the incidence of AKI is not well described. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of AKI in patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and its effects on clinical outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, retrospective, observational study of patients with COVID-19 admitted to two general hospitals in Wuhan from 5 January 2020 to 21 March 2020. Demographic data and information on organ dysfunction were collected daily. AKI was defined according to the KDIGO clinical practice guidelines. Early and late AKI were defined as AKI occurring within 72 h after admission or after 72 h, respectively. RESULTS: Of the 116 patients, AKI developed in 21 (18.1%) patients. Among them, early and late AKI were found in 13 (11.2%) and 8 (6.9%) patients, respectively. Compared with patients without AKI, patients with AKI had more severe organ dysfunction, as indicated by a higher level of disease severity status, higher sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score on admission, an increased prevalence of shock, and a higher level of respiratory support. Patients with AKI had a higher SOFA score on admission (4.5 ± 2.1 vs. 2.8 ± 1.4, OR 1.498, 95% CI 1.047-2.143 ) and greater hospital mortality (57.1% vs. 12.6%, OR 3.998, 95% CI 1.088-14.613) than patients without AKI in both the univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients with late AKI, but not those with early AKI, had a significantly prolonged length of stay (19.6 vs. 9.6 days, p = 0.015). CONCLUSION: Our findings show that admission SOFA score was an independent risk factor for AKI in COVID-19 patients, and patients with AKI had higher in-hospital mortality. Moreover, AKI development after 72 h of admission was related to prolonged hospitalization time.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Progression , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, General , Humans , Incidence , Kidney Function Tests , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Water-Electrolyte Balance
7.
Int J Infect Dis ; 98: 21-32, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) remain a significant public threat with high morbidity and mortality worldwide; viruses are significant pathogens that cause ARIs. This study was conducted to better understand the epidemiological characteristics of respiratory viruses circulating in southern China. METHODS: We collected 22,680 respiratory samples from ARI patients in 18 hospitals in southern China during 2009-2018; seven common respiratory viruses including Flu, RSV, PIV, hMPV, ADV, HCoV, and HBoV were screened using in-house real-time PCR. RESULTS: Of all samples, 9760 ARI cases (9760/22680, 43.03%) tested positive for the seven common respiratory viruses. The most detected virus was Flu (14.15%), followed by RSV (10.33%) and PIV (5.43%); Flu-A, PIV3, and HCoV-OC43 were the predominant subtypes. Although most of the viruses were detected in male inpatients, Flu was more likely detected in female outpatients. Flu infection was more likely to cause URTI (upper respiratory tract infection), whereas RSV infection was more likely to cause pneumonia and bronchitis. The prevalence of Flu was particularly high in 2009. The epidemic level was found notably high in 2014-2018 for RSV, in 2016-2018 for PIV, in the summer of 2018 for ADV, in the summer of 2016 and winter of 2018 for HCoV, and in the summer of 2011 and autumn of 2018 for HBoV. The co-detection rate of the seven viruses was 4.70%; RSV, PIV, and Flu were the most commonly co-detected viruses. CONCLUSIONS: This work demonstrates the epidemiological characteristics of seven common respiratory viruses in ARI patients in southern China.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Seasons , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Young Adult
9.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(6): 1324-1326, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-6800

ABSTRACT

We report co-infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and influenza A virus in a patient with pneumonia in China. The case highlights possible co-detection of known respiratory viruses. We noted low sensitivity of upper respiratory specimens for SARS-CoV-2, which could further complicate recognition of the full extent of disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Influenza A virus , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL