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2.
Drug Deliv Transl Res ; 11(4): 1498-1508, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237565

ABSTRACT

Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) have many advantages and represent an excellent alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. TDDS are more convenient and less invasive tools for disease and viral infection treatment, prevention, detection, and surveillance. The emerging development of microneedles for TDDS has facilitated improved skin barrier penetration for the delivery of macromolecules or hydrophilic drugs. Microneedle TDDS patches can be fabricated to deliver virus vaccines and potentially provide a viable alternative vaccine modality that offers improved immunogenicity, thermostability, simplicity, safety, and compliance as well as sharp-waste reduction, increased cost-effectiveness, and the capacity for self-administration, which could improve vaccine distribution. These advantages make TDDS-based vaccine delivery an especially well-suited option for treatment of widespread viral infectious diseases including pandemics. Because microneedle-based bioassays employ transdermal extraction of interstitial fluid or blood, they can be used as a minimally invasive approach for surveying disease markers and providing point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. For cutaneous viral infections, TDDS can provide localized treatment with high specificity and less systemic toxicity. In summary, TDDS, especially those that employ microneedles, possess special attributes that can be leveraged to reduce morbidity and mortality from viral infectious diseases. In this regard, they may have considerable positive impact as a modality for improving global health. In this article, we introduce the possible role and summarize the current literature regarding TDDS applications for fighting common cutaneous or systemic viral infectious diseases, including herpes simplex, varicella or herpes zoster, warts, influenza, measles, and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Microinjections/methods , Administration, Cutaneous , Animals , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases/immunology , Communicable Diseases/metabolism , Drug Delivery Systems/trends , Humans , Microinjections/trends
3.
Med Res Rev ; 41(3): 1775-1797, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1001951

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, has become a global crisis. As of November 9, COVID-19 has already spread to more than 190 countries with 50,000,000 infections and 1,250,000 deaths. Effective therapeutics and drugs are in high demand. The structure of SARS-CoV-2 is highly conserved with those of SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome-CoV. Enzymes, including RdRp, Mpro /3CLpro , and PLpro , which play important roles in viral transcription and replication, have been regarded as key targets for therapies against coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2. The identification of readily available drugs for repositioning in COVID-19 therapy is a relatively rapid approach for clinical treatment, and a series of approved or candidate drugs have been proven to be efficient against COVID-19 in preclinical or clinical studies. This review summarizes recent progress in the development of drugs against SARS-CoV-2 and the targets involved.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(44): 27381-27387, 2020 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-867659

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become a global crisis. There is no therapeutic treatment specific for COVID-19. It is highly desirable to identify potential antiviral agents against SARS-CoV-2 from existing drugs available for other diseases and thus repurpose them for treatment of COVID-19. In general, a drug repurposing effort for treatment of a new disease, such as COVID-19, usually starts from a virtual screening of existing drugs, followed by experimental validation, but the actual hit rate is generally rather low with traditional computational methods. Here we report a virtual screening approach with accelerated free energy perturbation-based absolute binding free energy (FEP-ABFE) predictions and its use in identifying drugs targeting SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro). The accurate FEP-ABFE predictions were based on the use of a restraint energy distribution (RED) function, making the practical FEP-ABFE-based virtual screening of the existing drug library possible. As a result, out of 25 drugs predicted, 15 were confirmed as potent inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro The most potent one is dipyridamole (inhibitory constant Ki = 0.04 µM) which has shown promising therapeutic effects in subsequently conducted clinical studies for treatment of patients with COVID-19. Additionally, hydroxychloroquine (Ki = 0.36 µM) and chloroquine (Ki = 0.56 µM) were also found to potently inhibit SARS-CoV-2 Mpro We anticipate that the FEP-ABFE prediction-based virtual screening approach will be useful in many other drug repurposing or discovery efforts.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Drug Repositioning , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cysteine Endopeptidases , Dipyridamole/pharmacology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Acta Pharm Sin B ; 10(7): 1205-1215, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-88716

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome, hypercoagulability, hypertension, and multiorgan dysfunction. Effective antivirals with safe clinical profile are urgently needed to improve the overall prognosis. In an analysis of a randomly collected cohort of 124 patients with COVID-19, we found that hypercoagulability as indicated by elevated concentrations of D-dimers was associated with disease severity. By virtual screening of a U.S. FDA approved drug library, we identified an anticoagulation agent dipyridamole (DIP) in silico, which suppressed SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro. In a proof-of-concept trial involving 31 patients with COVID-19, DIP supplementation was associated with significantly decreased concentrations of D-dimers (P < 0.05), increased lymphocyte and platelet recovery in the circulation, and markedly improved clinical outcomes in comparison to the control patients. In particular, all 8 of the DIP-treated severely ill patients showed remarkable improvement: 7 patients (87.5%) achieved clinical cure and were discharged from the hospitals while the remaining 1 patient (12.5%) was in clinical remission.

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