Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 25
Filter
Add filters

Year range
3.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-3987

ABSTRACT

A review COVID-19 is spreading worldwide, but there is still a lack of specific treatments for severe patients Viral infection induces cytokine storm (CS), leading to immunopathol damage, which is the core mechanism of the occurrence and development of severe pneumonia Therefore, the treatment for viral pneumonia by immunomodulation and inhibiting the CS is increasingly concerned Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been widely used in the prevention and treatment of epidemics With strong anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions, TCM is expected to inhibit the CS, reduce the tissue damage, and improve the prognosis of patients In this paper, based on the perspective of anti-inflammation and the CS inhibition, the role and pharmacodynamic mechanisms of TCM in the treatment of viral pneumonia are summarized, and the application prospect of TCM to the intervention for COVID-19 is prospected

4.
Front Public Health ; 8: 604089, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005926

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: Public health interventions such as social distancing, wearing surgical or N95 masks, and handwashing are effective in significantly reducing the risk of infection. The purpose of this article is to analyze the effect of public health interventions on respiratory tract infection-related visits to pediatric emergency departments during the COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan. Method: Pediatric emergency department visits between January 1 2020 and April 30 2020 were included for trend analysis and compared to the same period during the past 3 years. The datasets were retrieved from Taiwan National Infectious Disease Statistics System and Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Respiratory tract infections with other diagnoses categories, including fever, asthma, and urinary tract infections, were included for subgroup analysis. Result: A significant decrease of more than 50% in respiratory tract infection-related visits was found from February to April 2020 in the national database. With regard to diagnosis category, the proportion of respiratory tract infections in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Hospital also became significantly lower in 2020 during the months of March (43.4 vs. 37.4%, p = 0.024) and April (40.1 vs. 32.2%, p < 0.001). On the other hand, the proportion of urinary tract infections was significantly higher in 2020 during March (3.7 vs. 5.2%, p = 0.033) and April (3.9 vs. 6.5%, p < 0.001), and that of asthma was also higher in April (1.6 vs. 2.6%, p = 0.025). Furthermore, the intensive care unit admission rate was relatively higher in 2020 from February, with significant differences noted in March (1.3 vs. 2.8%, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Due to public health interventions for the COVID-19 pandemic, the transmission of not only COVID-19 but also other air droplet transmitted diseases in children may have been effectively prevented.

5.
Respir Res ; 21(1): 314, 2020 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-945210

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have focused on the clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients with the novel 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Limited data are available for convalescent patients. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical characteristics of discharged COVID-19 patients. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we extracted data for 134 convalescent patients with COVID-19 in Guizhou Provincial Staff Hospital from February 15 to March 31, 2020. Cases were analyzed on the basis of demographic, clinical, and laboratory data as well as radiological features. RESULTS: Of 134 convalescent patients with COVID-19, 19 (14.2%) were severe cases, while 115 (85.8%) were non-severe cases. The median patient age was 33 years (IQR, 21.8 to 46.3), and the cohort included 69 men and 65 women. Compared with non-severe cases, severe patients were older and had more chronic comorbidities, especially hypertension, diabetes, and thyroid disease (P < 0.05). Leukopenia was present in 32.1% of the convalescent patients and lymphocytopenia was present in 6.7%, both of which were more common in severe patients. 48 (35.8%) of discharged patients had elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, which was more common in adults than in children (40.2% vs 13.6%, P = 0.018). A normal chest CT was found in 61 (45.5%) patients during rehabilitation. Severe patients had more ground-glass opacity, bilateral patchy shadowing, and fibrosis. No significant differences were observed in the positive rate of IgG and/or IgM antibodies between severe and non-severe patients. CONCLUSION: Leukopenia, lymphopenia, ground-glass opacity, and fibrosis are common in discharged severe COVID-19 patients, and liver injury is common in discharged adult patients. We suggest physicians develop follow-up treatment plans based on the different clinical characteristics of convalescent patients.

6.
Ann Intern Med ; 2020 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890662

ABSTRACT

Several vaccine candidates to protect against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have entered or will soon enter large-scale, phase 3, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials. To facilitate harmonized evaluation and comparison of the efficacy of these vaccines, a general set of clinical endpoints is proposed, along with considerations to guide the selection of the primary endpoints on the basis of clinical and statistical reasoning. The plausibility that vaccine protection against symptomatic COVID-19 could be accompanied by a shift toward more SARS-CoV-2 infections that are asymptomatic is highlighted, as well as the potential implications of such a shift.

7.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-618

ABSTRACT

Background: Until now, the novel coronavirus 2019 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused wide dissemination in China and other 72 countries, affecting more than 90,000 peoples

9.
Hum Immunol ; 81(12): 702-708, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-773666

ABSTRACT

To discover immune factors that can predict the progression of COVID-19, we evaluated circulating immune cells and plasma cytokines in COVID-19 patients. We found that T cells, including CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, were significantly decreased in severe COVID-19 symptoms but not in mild symptoms, in comparison with healthy people. T cells remained at a low level after recovery from severe COVID-19. CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg-enriched cells were significantly increased in either mild or severe COVID-19 patients, regardless of recovery or not. Moreover, in either mild or severe COVID-19 patients, Treg-enriched cells up-regulated CD25 and down-regulated CD127. After recovery, CD25 was partially down-regulated but still higher than the normal level, while CD127 returned to the normal level in mild patients but not severe patients. B cells were decreased in mild patients and further decreased in severe patients, and remained low after recovery. NK cells were decreased only in severe COVID-19, with a tendency to return to the normal level after recovery. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 were both elevated in severe patients but not in mild patients. After recovery, IL-6 remained higher than its normal level, while IL-10 returned to the normal level. Binary logistic regression analysis indicated that CD4+ T cells, B cells, IL-6, and IL-10 were significantly associated with COVID-19 severity. Therefore, these parameters are indicators of COVID-19 severity. Dynamic monitoring of these parameters would benefit therapy planning and prognosis evaluation.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Adult , Aged , /epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index , Up-Regulation/immunology
11.
Sci Total Environ ; 753: 142289, 2021 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-752861

ABSTRACT

In the fight against the outbreak of COVID-19 in China, we treated some asymptomatic infected individuals. This study aimed to detect pathogens in biological and environmental samples of these asymptomatic infected individuals and analyse their association. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected biological and environmental samples from 19 patients treated in the isolation ward of Nanjing No.2 Hospital. Biological samples included saliva, pharyngeal swabs, blood, anal swabs, and exhaled breath condensate. Swab samples from the ward environment included inside masks, outside masks, palm swabs, bedside handrails, bedside tables, cell phone screens, toilet cell phone shelves, toilet pads and toilet lids. We also obtained some samples from public areas. We used RT-PCR to detect pathogens and colloidal gold to detect antibodies. As results, 19 asymptomatic infected individuals participated in the survey, with 8 positives for pathogens and 11 positives only for antibodies. Three positive samples were detected from among 96 environmental samples, respectively, from a cell phone surface, a cell phone shelf and a bedside handrail. No positive samples were detected in the exhaled breath condensate in this work. All patients identified pathogens in the environment had positive anal swabs. There was a statistical association between positive anal swabs and positive environmental samples. The association of positive samples from the surrounding of asymptomatically infected patients with positive anal swabs suggested that patients might secrete the virus for a more extended period.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans
12.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 105(12)2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742481

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Systemic corticosteroids are now recommended in many treatment guidelines, although supporting evidence is limited to 1 randomized controlled clinical trial (RECOVERY). OBJECTIVE: To identify whether corticosteroids were beneficial to COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A total of 1514 severe and 249 critical hospitalized COVID-19 patients from 2 medical centers in Wuhan, China. Multivariable Cox models, Cox model with time-varying exposure and propensity score analysis (inverse-probability-of-treatment-weighting [IPTW] and propensity score matching [PSM]) were used to estimate the association of corticosteroid use with risk of in-hospital mortality in severe and critical cases. RESULTS: Corticosteroids were administered in 531 (35.1%) severe and 159 (63.9%) critical patients. Compared to the non-corticosteroid group, systemic corticosteroid use was not associated with beneficial effect in reducing in-hospital mortality in either severe cases (HR = 1.77; 95% CI, 1.08-2.89; P = 0.023), or critical cases (HR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.08-3.98; P = 0.028). Findings were similar in time-varying Cox analysis. For patients with severe COVID-19 at admission, corticosteroid use was not associated with improved or harmful outcome in either PSM or IPTW analysis. For critical COVID-19 patients at admission, results were consistent with multivariable Cox model analysis. CONCLUSION: Corticosteroid use was not associated with beneficial effect in reducing in-hospital mortality for severe or critical cases in Wuhan. Absence of the beneficial effect in our study in contrast to that observed in the RECOVERY clinical trial may be due to biases in observational data, in particular prescription by indication bias, differences in clinical characteristics of patients, choice of corticosteroid used, timing of initiation of treatment, and duration of treatment.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
13.
BMC Psychiatry ; 20(1): 417, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-727269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the resilience of non-local medical workers sent to support local medical workers in treating the outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). METHODS: In February 2020, non-local medical workers who had been sent to Wuhan as support staff to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak were asked to complete an online survey composed of the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). RESULTS: Survey responses from 114 non-local medical workers were analyzed. CD-RISC scores were high (67.03 ± 13.22). The resilience level was highest for physicians (73.48 ± 11.49), followed by support staff, including health care assistants, technicians (67.78 ± 12.43) and nurses (64.86 ± 13.46). Respondents differed significantly in the levels of education, training/support provided by the respondent's permanent hospital (where he or she normally works), and in their feelings of being adequately prepared and confident to complete tasks (P < 0.05). Resilience correlated negatively with anxiety (r = -.498, P < 0.01) and depression (r = -.471, P < 0.01) but positively with active coping styles (r = .733, P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that active coping (ß = 1.314, p < 0.05), depression (ß = -.806, p < 0.05), anxiety (ß = - 1.091, p < 0.05), and training/support provided by the respondent's permanent hospital (ß = 3.510, p < 0.05) were significant associated with resilience. CONCLUSION: Our data show that active coping, depression, anxiety, and training/support provided by the respondent's permanent hospital are associated with resilience. Managers of medical staff should use these data to develop psychosocial interventions aimed at reinforcing the resilience of medical workers during highly stressful and prolonged medical emergencies, as seen during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Sci Total Environ ; 753: 141710, 2021 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713250

ABSTRACT

Respiratory and fecal aerosols play confirmed and suspected roles, respectively, in transmitting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). An extensive environmental sampling campaign of both toilet and non-toilet environments was performed in a dedicated hospital building for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and the associated environmental factors were analyzed. In total, 107 surface samples, 46 air samples, two exhaled condensate samples, and two expired air samples were collected within and beyond four three-bed isolation rooms. The data of the COVID-19 patients were collected. The building environmental design and the cleaning routines were reviewed. Field measurements of airflow and CO2 concentrations were conducted. The 107 surface samples comprised 37 from toilets, 34 from other surfaces in isolation rooms, and 36 from other surfaces outside the isolation rooms in the hospital. Four of these samples were positive, namely two ward door handles, one bathroom toilet seat cover, and one bathroom door handle. Three were weakly positive, namely one bathroom toilet seat, one bathroom washbasin tap lever, and one bathroom ceiling exhaust louver. Of the 46 air samples, one collected from a corridor was weakly positive. The two exhaled condensate samples and the two expired air samples were negative. The fecal-derived aerosols in patients' toilets contained most of the detected SARS-CoV-2 in the hospital, highlighting the importance of surface and hand hygiene for intervention.


Subject(s)
Bathroom Equipment , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Betacoronavirus , Hospitals , Humans
15.
Infect Drug Resist ; 13: 2609-2615, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-703757

ABSTRACT

Background: The pandemic due to the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in an increasing number of patients need to be tested. We aimed to determine if the use of integrated laboratory data can discriminate COVID-19 patients from other pulmonary infection patients. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted at Kunming Third People's Hospital in China from January 20 to February 28, 2020. Medical records and laboratory data were extracted and combined for COVID-19 and other pulmonary infection patients on admission. A partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model was constructed and calibrated to discriminate COVID-19 from other pulmonary infection patients. Results: COVID-19 patients diagnosed and treated in Kunming were balanced in terms of sex and covered all age groups. Most of them were mild cases; only five were severe cases. The first two dimensions of the PLS-DA model could classify COVID-19 and other pulmonary infection patients with an accuracy of 96.6% (95.1% in the cross-validation model). Basophil count, the proportion of basophils, prothrombin time, prothrombin time activity, and international normalized ratio were the five most discriminant biomarkers. Conclusion: Integration of biomarkers can discriminate COVID-19 patients from other pulmonary infections on admission to hospital and thus may be a supplement to nucleic acid tests.

16.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 79(9): 1163-1169, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601964

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Increasing data about COVID-19 have been acquired from the general population. We aim to further evaluate the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (AIDs). METHODS: We included all confirmed inpatients with COVID-19 and systemic AIDs in Wuhan Tongji Hospital from 29 January to 8 March 2020. We retrospectively collected and analysed information on epidemiology of 1255 inpatients and additional clinical characteristics of patients with systemic AIDs. Outcomes were followed up until 16 April 2020. RESULTS: Of the 1255 patients with COVID-19, the median age was 64.0 years and 53.1% were male. More than half (63.0%) had chronic comorbidities. The proportions of elderly, male and patients with comorbidities were significantly higher in intensive care unit (ICU) than in the general ward (p<0.001). 17 (0.61%) patients with systemic AIDs were further screened and analysed from 2804 inpatients. The median age was 64.0 years and 82.4% were female. All patients were living in Wuhan and two family clusters were found. 1 (5.9%) patient was admitted to ICU and one died. 10 (62.5%) of 16 patients changed or stopped their anti-AIDs treatments during hospitalisation, and 5 of them felt that the disease had worsened after the quarantine. CONCLUSIONS: Older males with chronic comorbidities are more vulnerable to severe COVID-19. The lower proportion of COVID-19 in patients with systemic AIDs needs more high-quality human clinical trials and in-depth mechanism researches. Of note, the withdrawal of anti-AIDs treatments during hospitalisation can lead to flares of diseases.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases/virology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
17.
Scientometrics ; : 1-27, 2020 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591373

ABSTRACT

As of the middle of April 2020, the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic has claimed more than 137,000 lives (https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html). Because of its extremely fast spreading, the attention of the global scientific community is now focusing on slowing down, containing and finally stopping the spread of this disease. This requires the concerted action of researchers and practitioners of many related fields, raising, as always in such situations the question, of what kind of research has to be conducted, what are the priorities, how has research to be coordinated and who needs to be involved. In other words, what are the characteristics of the response of the global research community on the challenge? In the present paper, we attempt to characterise, quantify and measure the response of academia to international public health emergencies in a comparative bibliometric study of multiple outbreaks. In addition, we provide a preliminary review of the global research effort regarding the defeat of the COVID-19 pandemic. From our analysis of six infectious disease outbreaks since 2000, including COVID-19, we find that academia always responded quickly to public health emergencies with a sharp increase in the number of publications immediately following the declaration of an outbreak by the WHO. In general, countries/regions place emphasis on epidemics in their own region, but Europe and North America are also concerned with outbreaks in other, developed and less developed areas through conducting intensive collaborative research with the core countries/regions of the outbreak, such as in the case of Ebola in Africa. Researches in the fields of virology, infectious diseases and immunology are the most active, and we identified two characteristic patterns in global science distinguishing research in Europe and America that is more focused on public health from that conducted in China and Japan with more emphasis on biomedical research and clinical pharmacy, respectively. Universities contribute slightly less than half to the global research output, and the vast majority of research funding originates from the public sector. Our findings on how academia responds to emergencies could be beneficial to decision-makers in research and health policy in creating and adjusting anti-epidemic/-pandemic strategies.

18.
BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care ; 8(1)2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-542410

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With intense deficiency of medical resources during COVID-19 pandemic, risk stratification is of strategic importance. Blood glucose level is an important risk factor for the prognosis of infection and critically ill patients. We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of blood glucose level in patients with COVID-19. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We collected clinical and survival information of 2041 consecutive hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from two medical centers in Wuhan. Patients without available blood glucose level were excluded. We performed multivariable Cox regression to calculate HRs of blood glucose-associated indexes for the risk of progression to critical cases/mortality among non-critical cases, as well as in-hospital mortality in critical cases. Sensitivity analysis were conducted in patient without diabetes. RESULTS: Elevation of admission blood glucose level was an independent risk factor for progression to critical cases/death among non-critical cases (HR=1.30, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.63, p=0.026). Elevation of initial blood glucose level of critical diagnosis was an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality in critical cases (HR=1.84, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.98, p=0.013). Higher median glucose level during hospital stay or after critical diagnosis (≥6.1 mmol/L) was independently associated with increased risks of progression to critical cases/death among non-critical cases, as well as in-hospital mortality in critical cases. Above results were consistent in the sensitivity analysis in patients without diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Elevation of blood glucose level predicted worse outcomes in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Our findings may provide a simple and practical way to risk stratify COVID-19 inpatients for hierarchical management, particularly where medical resources are in severe shortage during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Glucose/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospitalization , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Illness , Disease Progression , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Inpatients , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
20.
Chin. J. Microbiol. Immunol. ; 4(40): 250-255, 20200430.
Article in Chinese | ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-478481

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the performance of three antibody kits for novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and to investigate the feasibility and advantages of them in clinical application. Methods: A total of 104 patients who were admitted to Guangzhou Eighth People's Hospital with COVID-19 from January to February 2020 were selected as research group. Fifty-one healthy subjects were selected during the same period as negative control group. Serum antibodies (IgM/IgG) against SARS-CoV-2 were detected using two kinds of colloidal gold kits (A and B kits) and one chemiluminescence kit (C kit). The positive rates of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid in different samples from patients with COVID-19 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The clinical sensitivity of A kit to detect SARS-CoV-2-specific IgM and IgG was 77.88% (81/104) and 65.38% (68/104), respectively, and the clinical specificity was 70.59% (36/51) and 100.00% (51/51). However, the false positive rate in IgM detection was as high as 29.41% (15/51). The sensitivity of B kit to test total antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 was 63.46% (66/104), and the clinical specificity was 94.12% (48/51). The clinical sensitivity of C kit to detect SARS-CoV-2-specific IgM and IgG were respectively 31.73% (33/104) and 64.42% (67/104), and the clinical specificity were both 98.04% (50/51). There was a moderate correlation between the detection results of two colloidal gold kits and the chemiluminescence kit with the Kappa values of 0.462 and 0.587 (Z=6.157, P<0.01; Z=7.345, P<0.01). C kit had the highest positive detection rate for IgG, and would be more reliable to be used for IgG detection in COVID-19 patients 14 d after onset. The total positive detection rate of nucleic acid in all types of samples was 63.46% (66/104). The highest positive detection rate was in throat swabs or sputum samples, followed by those in blood samples and anal swabs. No viral nucleic acid was detected in urine samples for the time being. Conclusions: SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies could be detected in the early or late stage of COVID-19. The method of antibody detection has the advantages of shorter detection time, simple operation and high biological safety, indicating that it could be used as a supplementary or auxiliary detection for the diagnosis of suspected COVID-19 cases with negative nucleic acid test results. The chemiluminescence kit has good sensitivity and specificity, and is well recommended for clinical laboratories.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL