Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
Lancet Respir Med ; 10(1): e5-e6, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616874
2.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 533-544, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537202

ABSTRACT

Cough is one of the most common presenting symptoms of COVID-19, along with fever and loss of taste and smell. Cough can persist for weeks or months after SARS-CoV-2 infection, often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive impairment, dyspnoea, or pain-a collection of long-term effects referred to as the post-COVID syndrome or long COVID. We hypothesise that the pathways of neurotropism, neuroinflammation, and neuroimmunomodulation through the vagal sensory nerves, which are implicated in SARS-CoV-2 infection, lead to a cough hypersensitivity state. The post-COVID syndrome might also result from neuroinflammatory events in the brain. We highlight gaps in understanding of the mechanisms of acute and chronic COVID-19-associated cough and post-COVID syndrome, consider potential ways to reduce the effect of COVID-19 by controlling cough, and suggest future directions for research and clinical practice. Although neuromodulators such as gabapentin or opioids might be considered for acute and chronic COVID-19 cough, we discuss the possible mechanisms of COVID-19-associated cough and the promise of new anti-inflammatories or neuromodulators that might successfully target both the cough of COVID-19 and the post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/etiology , Inflammation/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Neuroimmunomodulation , Cough/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome
3.
Br J Sports Med ; 56(1): 4-11, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338850

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To report COVID-19 illness pattern, symptom duration and time loss in UK elite athletes. METHODS: Observational, clinical and database review of athletes with symptomatic COVID-19 illness managed within the UK Sports Institutes. Athletes were classified as confirmed (positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR or antibody tests) or probable (consistent clinical features) COVID-19. Clinical presentation was characterised by the predominant symptom focus (eg, upper or lower respiratory illness). Time loss was defined as days unavailable for full sport participation and comparison was made with a 2016-2019 respiratory illness dataset from the same surveillance system. RESULTS: Between 24 February 2020 and 18 January 2021, 147 athletes (25 Paralympic (17%)) with mean (SD) age 24.7 (5.2) years, 37% female, were diagnosed with COVID-19 (76 probable, 71 confirmed). Fatigue was the most prevalent symptom (57%), followed by dry cough (50%) and headache (46%). The median (IQR) symptom duration was 10 (6-17) days but 14% reported symptoms >28 days. Median time loss was 18 (12-30) days, with 27% not fully available >28 days from initial date of infection. This was greater than our historical non-COVID respiratory illness comparator; 6 days, 0-7 days (p<0.001) and 4% unavailable at 28 days. A lower respiratory phenotype (ie, including dyspnoea±chest pain±cough±fever) was present in 18% and associated with a higher relative risk of prolonged symptoms risk ratio 3.0 (95% CI: 1.4 to 6.5) and time loss 2.1 (95% CI: 1.2 to 3.5). CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort, COVID-19 largely resulted in a mild, self-limiting illness. The presence of lower respiratory tract features was associated with prolonged illness and a delayed return to sport.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Athletes , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
Curr Opin Physiol ; 21: 29-35, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237665

ABSTRACT

In people recovering from COVID-19, there is concern regarding potential long-term pulmonary sequelae and associated impairment of functional capacity. Data published thus far indicate that spirometric indices appear to be generally well preserved, but that a defect in diffusing capacity (DLco) is a prevalent abnormality identified on follow-up lung function; present in 20-30% of those with mild to moderate disease and 60% in those with severe disease. Reductions in total lung capacity were commonly reported. Functional capacity is also often impaired, with data now starting to emerge detailing walk test and cardiopulmonary exercise test outcome at follow-up. In this review, we evaluate the published evidence in this area, to summarise the impact of COVID-19 infection on pulmonary function and relate this to the clinico-radiological findings and disease severity.

5.
Br J Sports Med ; 55(20): 1144-1152, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147327

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are no data relating symptoms of an acute respiratory illness (ARI) in general, and COVID-19 specifically, to return to play (RTP). OBJECTIVE: To determine if ARI symptoms are associated with more prolonged RTP, and if days to RTP and symptoms (number, type, duration and severity) differ in athletes with COVID-19 versus athletes with other ARI. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study. SETTING: Online survey. PARTICIPANTS: Athletes with confirmed/suspected COVID-19 (ARICOV) (n=45) and athletes with other ARI (ARIOTH) (n=39). METHODS: Participants recorded days to RTP and completed an online survey detailing ARI symptoms (number, type, severity and duration) in three categories: 'nose and throat', 'chest and neck' and 'whole body'. We report the association between symptoms and RTP (% chance over 40 days) and compare the days to RTP and symptoms (number, type, duration and severity) in ARICOV versus ARIOTH subgroups. RESULTS: The symptom cluster associated with more prolonged RTP (lower chance over 40 days; %) (univariate analysis) was 'excessive fatigue' (75%; p<0.0001), 'chills' (65%; p=0.004), 'fever' (64%; p=0.004), 'headache' (56%; p=0.006), 'altered/loss sense of smell' (51%; p=0.009), 'Chest pain/pressure' (48%; p=0.033), 'difficulty in breathing' (48%; p=0.022) and 'loss of appetite' (47%; p=0.022). 'Excessive fatigue' remained associated with prolonged RTP (p=0.0002) in a multiple model. Compared with ARIOTH, the ARICOV subgroup had more severe disease (greater number, more severe symptoms) and more days to RTP (p=0.0043). CONCLUSION: Symptom clusters may be used by sport and exercise physicians to assist decision making for RTP in athletes with ARI (including COVID-19).


Subject(s)
Athletes/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology , Return to Sport/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
7.
Clin Exp Allergy ; 50(12): 1287-1293, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841769

ABSTRACT

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, laryngoscopy was the mandatory gold standard for the accurate assessment and diagnosis of inducible laryngeal obstruction. However, upper airway endoscopy is considered an aerosol-generating procedure in professional guidelines, meaning routine procedures are highly challenging and the availability of laryngoscopy is reduced. In response, we have convened a multidisciplinary panel with broad experience in managing this disease and agreed a recommended strategy for presumptive diagnosis in patients who cannot have laryngoscopy performed due to pandemic restrictions. To maintain clinical standards whilst ensuring patient safety, we discuss the importance of triage, information gathering, symptom assessment and early review of response to treatment. The consensus recommendations will also be potentially relevant to other future situations where access to laryngoscopy is restricted, although we emphasize that this investigation remains the gold standard.


Subject(s)
Airway Obstruction/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Critical Pathways , Laryngeal Diseases/diagnosis , Consensus , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
8.
Br J Sports Med ; 54(19): 1157-1161, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744836

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is the causative virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. This pandemic has necessitated that all professional and elite sport is either suspended, postponed or cancelled altogether to minimise the risk of viral spread. As infection rates drop and quarantine restrictions are lifted, the question how athletes can safely resume competitive sport is being asked. Given the rapidly evolving knowledge base about the virus and changing governmental and public health recommendations, a precise answer to this question is fraught with complexity and nuance. Without robust data to inform policy, return-to-play (RTP) decisions are especially difficult for elite athletes on the suspicion that the COVID-19 virus could result in significant cardiorespiratory compromise in a minority of afflicted athletes. There are now consistent reports of athletes reporting persistent and residual symptoms many weeks to months after initial COVID-19 infection. These symptoms include cough, tachycardia and extreme fatigue. To support safe RTP, we provide sport and exercise medicine physicians with practical recommendations on how to exclude cardiorespiratory complications of COVID-19 in elite athletes who place high demand on their cardiorespiratory system. As new evidence emerges, guidance for a safe RTP should be updated.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Respiration Disorders/diagnosis , Return to Sport/standards , Athletes , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Death, Sudden, Cardiac/prevention & control , Electrocardiography , Humans , Myocarditis/blood , Myocarditis/etiology , Myocardium/pathology , Necrosis/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiration Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sports Medicine/standards , Symptom Assessment , Troponin/blood
10.
Int J Sports Med ; 41(13): 895-911, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-496519

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 has resulted in widespread training disruption in many sports. Some athletes have access to facilities and equipment, while others have limited or no access, severely limiting their training practices. A primary concern is that the maintenance of key physical qualities (e. g. strength, power, high-speed running ability, acceleration, deceleration and change of direction), game-specific contact skills (e. g. tackling) and decision-making ability, are challenged, impacting performance and injury risk on resumption of training and competition. In extended periods of reduced training, without targeted intervention, changes in body composition and function can be profound. However, there are strategies that can dramatically mitigate potential losses, including resistance training to failure with lighter loads, plyometric training, exposure to high-speed running to ensure appropriate hamstring conditioning, and nutritional intervention. Athletes may require psychological support given the challenges associated with isolation and a change in regular training routine. While training restrictions may result in a decrease in some physical and psychological qualities, athletes can return in a positive state following an enforced period of rest and recovery. On return to training, the focus should be on progression of all aspects of training, taking into account the status of individual athletes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physical Education and Training , Return to Sport , Athletic Performance , Competitive Behavior , Humans , Physical Distancing , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL