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1.
Health Technol (Berl) ; 12(2): 597-606, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881535

ABSTRACT

Co-development of healthcare technology with users helps produce user-friendly products, ensuring safe device usage and meeting patients' needs. For developers considering healthcare innovations, engaging user experience can reduce production time and cost while maximizing device application. The purpose of this paper is to report lessons learned from the development of a 3D printed origami ventilator prototype in response to the rise of ventilator demand due to the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. We conducted focus groups with frontline clinicians working in an Intensive Care Unit of a large urban hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. In the interdisciplinary focus groups, we identified challenges, practical tips about product development, the human needs of technology, and cross-discipline peer learning. The focus group discussions provide useful insight into the technology development for complex clinical contexts. Based on our experiences, we articulate five practical tips for co-development of healthcare technology - AGILE: Analyse users' needs first, Gain insights into complex context, Involve users early and frequently, Lead with a prototype, and Educate and support. Through sharing the tips and lessons learned, we wish to emphasize the necessity of meaningful multi-disciplinary collaboration during healthcare technology development and promote the inclusion of frontline clinicians during these initiatives. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12553-022-00655-w.

2.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e055990, 2022 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769916

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: More than 50 million people worldwide are living with dementia in 2020, and this number is expected to double every 20 years. Physical exercise is a growing field in non-pharmacological interventions for dementia care. Due to public health measures during the COVID-19 pandemic, more people have considered adapting to technology-based exercise via digital devices. This scoping review will explore evidence relating to the use of technology-based group exercise by people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This review will follow the Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review methodology to review literature published between June and December 2021. This review is designed to identify existing types of technology-based group exercise interventions for people with dementia. The review will provide a synthesis of current evidence on the outcome and impacts of technology-based group exercise. The context of this review will include homes, assisted living facilities and memory care services but exclude hospitals. The review will include a three-step search strategy: (a) identify keywords from MEDLINE and Embase, (b) search using the identified keywords in databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo and Google) and (c) review references from included studies to identify additional studies. Only studies in English will be included. Four researchers will independently assess titles and abstracts and then review the full text of the selected articles, applying the inclusion criteria. The extracted data will be presented in tables and summarised narratively. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Scoping review data will be collected from publicly available articles; research ethics approval is not required. The findings will be disseminated to healthcare practitioners and the public through a peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Dementia , Cognitive Dysfunction/therapy , Dementia/therapy , Exercise Therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , Technology
3.
Health and Technology ; : 1-10, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1738256

ABSTRACT

Co-development of healthcare technology with users helps produce user-friendly products, ensuring safe device usage and meeting patients’ needs. For developers considering healthcare innovations, engaging user experience can reduce production time and cost while maximizing device application. The purpose of this paper is to report lessons learned from the development of a 3D printed origami ventilator prototype in response to the rise of ventilator demand due to the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. We conducted focus groups with frontline clinicians working in an Intensive Care Unit of a large urban hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. In the interdisciplinary focus groups, we identified challenges, practical tips about product development, the human needs of technology, and cross-discipline peer learning. The focus group discussions provide useful insight into the technology development for complex clinical contexts. Based on our experiences, we articulate five practical tips for co-development of healthcare technology - AGILE: Analyse users’ needs first, Gain insights into complex context, Involve users early and frequently, Lead with a prototype, and Educate and support. Through sharing the tips and lessons learned, we wish to emphasize the necessity of meaningful multi-disciplinary collaboration during healthcare technology development and promote the inclusion of frontline clinicians during these initiatives. Supplementary Information The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12553-022-00655-w.

4.
Perspectives ; 42(1):30-33, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1738195

ABSTRACT

Following the public health policies enacted in British Columbia, our long-term care (LTC) home restricted visitors from the outside. Keywords: practice improvement project, long-term care homes, COVID-19, resident dining experience, staff selfreflection BACKGROUND The COVID-19 pandemic has caused great changes in the everyday life of long-term care (LTC) home residents and has presented difficult challenges for LTC home staff to support and provide care with residents. [...]Hung searched for the codes and patterns across the data and identified initial themes. [...]all authors discussed the themes together in research meetings (via Zoom) and gained analytic consensus and refined the final themes.

5.
BMC Nurs ; 21(1): 45, 2022 Feb 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705592

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has significant impact on long-term care (LTC) residents and staff. The purpose of this paper is to report the data gathered during a COVID-19 outbreak in a Canadian LTC home regarding staff experiences, challenges, and needs, to offer lessons learned and implications. METHODS: A total of 30 staff from multiple disciplines participated in the study, including nurses, care workers, recreational staff, and a unit clerk. Focus groups (n = 20) and one-on-one interviews (n = 10) were conducted as part of a larger participatory action research (PAR) study in a Canadian LTC home. All data collection was conducted virtually via Zoom, and thematic analysis was performed to identify themes. RESULTS: Four main themes were identified: We are Proud, We Felt Anxious, We Grew Closer to Residents and Staff Members, and The Vaccines Help. CONCLUSIONS: This research details the resilience that characterizes staff in LTC, while highlighting the emotional toll of the pandemic, particularly during an outbreak. LTC staff in this study found innovative ways to connect and support residents and this resulted in stronger connections and relationships. Leadership and organizational support are pivotal for supporting team resilience to manage crisis and adapt positively in times of COVID-19 pandemic, especially during the period of outbreak.

6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312800

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has significant impact on long-term care (LTC) residents and staff. The purpose of this paper is to report the data gathered during a COVID-19 outbreak in a Canadian LTC home regarding staff experiences, challenges, and needs, to offer lessons learned and implications. Methods: : A total of 30 staff from multiple disciplines participated in the study, including nurses, care workers, recreational staff, and a unit clerk. Focus groups (n=20) and one-on-one interviews (n=10) were conducted as part of a larger participatory action research (PAR) in a Canadian LTC home. All data collection was conducted virtually via Zoom, and thematic analysis was performed to identify themes. Results: : Four main themes were identified: We are Proud, We Felt Anxious, We Grew Closer to Residents and Staff Members, and The Vaccines Help. Conclusions: : This research details the resilience that characterizes staff in LTC, while highlighting the emotional toll of the pandemic, particularly during an outbreak. LTC staff in this study found innovative ways to connect and support residents and this resulted in stronger connections and relationships. Leadership and organizational support are pivotal for supporting team resilience to manage crisis and adapt positively in times of COVID-19 pandemic, especially during the period of outbreak.

7.
Innovation in Aging ; 5(Supplement_1):311-311, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1584647

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic brings challenges to patient partnerships in research. In-person research meetings with patient partners were prohibited. In this presentation, we outline specific issues we encountered in a patient-led dementia research project, which involved a literature review study and gathering community stakeholders to identify the top 10 local priorities in the development of a dementia-friendly community. We will describe how we found shared solutions to complete the project. In response to COVID, computers and training were provided for patient partners to maintain team connection, plan project activities, conduct team analysis, and host a community workshop in the lockdown time. The drastic shift to virtual research methods created barriers and opportunities for co-research with older people with dementia. Virtual meetings can generate inequities for those who do not have a computer and knowledge in videoconferencing. Practical strategies to overcome barriers to using virtual technologies will be explored.

8.
Innovation in Aging ; 5(Supplement_1):389-389, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1584594

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the fragile state of patient involvement in research. The involvement of the most vulnerable population (older people with dementia) in research was even more challenging. This presentation outlines challenges my research team encountered in patient-led projects (older people with dementia) and describes how we found creative strategies to set up and complete research during the time of pandemic. I will describe how the team applied collaborative participatory principles to engage a team with diverse backgrounds in the lockdown time to maintain research progress. Patient partners in my research team actively led recruitment, research planning and decision-making, team analysis and knowledge exchange. University students in our research team helped to make technology easy to use for our patient partners. The friendly, flexible and accessible exchange between students and patient partners reinforced the importance of a respectful relational approach in patient-oriented research.

9.
Alzheimers Dement ; 17 Suppl 8: e057324, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although there have been considerable public concerns about the impact of COVID-19 on residents living in long-term care homes, much less attention has focused on lessons learned from staff experiences about caring for people with dementia during outbreaks. The outbreaks added significant additional stress to the nursing workforce, which has historically experienced high turnover, chronic staffing shortages, and increased burnout in long-term care settings. We conducted focus groups (n=20) and individual interviews (n=10) to investigate critical challenges, experiences, and support needed for frontline staff in a long-term care home in British Columbia, Canada. A total of 30 staff in multiple disciplines participated in the study. They included Registered Nurses, Licenced Practical Nurses, care staff, recreational staff, and unit clerks. We applied qualitative thematic analysis and identified four themes: (a) I am proud, (b) we become stronger, (c) I am nervous (d) the vaccine helps. The frontline staff's voices provided a detailed description of their emotional experiences, creative coping strategies and positive stories about caring for the most vulnerable population in extraordinary situations. In our poster, lessons learned and implications for future research and practice will be explored and discussed.

10.
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(11): e054900, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523045

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has necessitated greater adoption of virtual care (eg, telephone (audio), videoconference) delivery models. Virtual care provides opportunities for innovative practice in care planning with older persons and meaningful family engagement by synchronously involving multiple care providers. Nevertheless, there remains a paucity of summarising evidence regarding virtual team-based care planning for older persons. The purpose of this scoping review is to summarise evidence on the utilisation of virtual team-based care planning for older persons in formal care settings. Specifically, (1) what has been reported in the literature on the impact or outcomes of virtual team-based care planning? (2) What are the facilitators and barriers to implementation? METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will follow a rigorous and well-established methodology by the Joanna Briggs Institute, supplemented by the Arksey & O'Malley and Levac, Colquhoun, & O'Brien frameworks. A three-step search strategy will be used to conduct a search on virtual team-based care planning for older persons in formal care settings. Keywords and index terms will be identified from an initial search in PubMed and AgeLine, and used to conduct the full search in the databases PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, AgeLine, PsycInfo and Scopus. Reference lists of included articles and grey literature retrieved through Google and Google Scholar will also be reviewed. Three researchers will screen titles and abstracts, and will conduct full-text review for inclusion. Extracted data will be mapped in a table. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Research ethics approval is not required for data collection from publicly accessible information. Findings will be presented at conferences, submitted for open-access publication in a peer-reviewed journal and made accessible to multiple stakeholders. The scoping review will summarise the literature on virtual team-based care planning for the purpose of informing the implementation of a virtual PIECES™ intervention (Physical/Intellectual/Emotional health, Capabilities, Environment, and Social).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Research Design , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Peer Review , Review Literature as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Sustainability ; 13(20):11502, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1470985

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is spreading across the globe, and it could take years for society to fully recover. Personal protective equipment (PPE), various hygiene measures, and social distancing have been implemented to reduce “human to human” contact, which is an essential part of outbreak prevention. The pressure of the pandemic combined with decreased communication and social contact have taken a toll on the mental health of many individuals, especially with respect to anxiety and depression. Effective use of robots and technology as a substitute for—or in coordination with—traditional medicine could play a valuable role in reducing psychological distress now more than ever. This paper summarizes the results of a comprehensive review of clinical research on PARO, a therapeutic seal robot, which has been used extensively as a biofeedback medical device and socially assistive robot in the field of mental health. PARO has proven to be an effective and economical non-pharmacological intervention method for both mental and physical well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Utilization of PARO during these times has provided more data for consideration and has helped in mitigating the negative stigma surrounding using robots in therapeutic settings.

13.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e051769, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416679

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Social isolation is a significant issue in aged care settings (eg, long-term care (LTC) and hospital) and is associated with adverse outcomes such as reduced well-being and loneliness. Loneliness is linked with depression, anxiety, cognitive decline, weakened immune system, poor physical health, poor quality of life and mortality. The use of robotic assistance may help mitigate social isolation and loneliness. Although telepresence robots have been used in healthcare settings, a comprehensive review of studies focusing on their use in aged care for reducing social isolation requires further investigation. This scoping review will focus on the use of telepresence robots to support social connection of older people in care settings. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will follow Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review methodology. The review team consists of patient partners and family partners, a nurse researcher and a group of students. In the scoping review, we will search the following databases: MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL, PsycINFO (EBSCO), Web of Science and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. Google and Google Scholar will be used to search for additional literature. A handsearch will be conducted using the reference lists of included studies to identify additional relevant articles. The scoping review will consider studies of using a telepresence robotic technology with older adults in care settings (ie, LTC and hospital), published in English. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Since the methodology of the study consists of collecting data from publicly available articles, it does not require ethics approval. By examining the current state of using telepresence to support older people in care settings, this scoping review can offer useful insight into users' needs (eg, patients' and care providers' needs) and inform future research and practice. We will share the scoping review results through conference presentations and an open access publication in a peer-reviewed journal.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Robotics , Aged , Humans , Loneliness , Long-Term Care , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , Social Isolation
14.
J Aging Soc Policy ; 33(4-5): 539-554, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313693

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed persistent inequities in the long-term care sector and brought strict social/physical distancing distancing and public health quarantine guidelines that inadvertently put long-term care residents at risk for social isolation and loneliness. Virtual communication and technologies have come to the forefront as the primary mode for residents to maintain connections with their loved ones and the outside world; yet, many long-term care homes do not have the technological capabilities to support modern day technologies. There is an urgent need to replace antiquated technological infrastructures to enable person-centered care and prevent potentially irreversible cognitive and psychological declines by ensuring residents are able to maintain important relationships with their family and friends. To this end, we provide five technological recommendations to support the ethos of person-centered care in residential long-term care homes during the pandemic and  in a post-COVID-19 pandemic world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Long-Term Care , Nursing Homes , Patient-Centered Care , Technology , Aged , Humans , Internet , Social Isolation , Videoconferencing
15.
16.
Alzheimer's & Dementia ; 16(S8):e047675, 2020.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-959102

ABSTRACT

Abstract Background People staying in hospitals need more support to cope with the lock down and visitor restriction during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially for older people with cognitive or physical impairment. Everyday technology such as a touchscreen tablet has great potential to support person-centred care. Aims: We aimed to support the adoption of tablets for hospitalized people with dementia to connect with families and friends. Methods A patient-oriented research approach was employed to co-produce the toolkit. We are a transdisciplinary team, including a medical student, physicians, nurses, patients, and family partners. We facilitated staff focus groups (n = 3), and conducted stakeholders' interviews (n = 4) to gain a more comprehensive understanding of users' needs. The sample included ten patients, ten family members, 40 staff members, nurses, care workers, physicians, and unit clerks (n = 40). The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) guided the research design and qualitative analysis. Results A toolkit was developed based on participants? perspectives on what needs to be in place to support successful adoption. We developed a mobile tablet with one mechanical arm and one leg on wheels. Participants reported impacts: (a) it puts a smile on the patient?s face, (b) it alleviates anxiety and worries on both sides, and (c) it reduces responsive behaviours. Conclusions The conceptual framework CFIR provides helpful guidance in identifying barriers to implementation. Working with users including patient and family partners to explore possible solutions was key to our success. Future research should engage patient and family partners to seek proactive strategies to address obstacles to advance the science of technology implementation.

17.
Nurs Older People ; 2020 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-918862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Being in an unfamiliar environment away from family can exacerbate emotional stress in hospitalised older people with dementia. Technology solutions can be used to address their mental and emotional health needs. AIM: To generate greater understanding of technology adoption and to test strategies supporting virtual care interventions in hospitalised older people with dementia, such as the use of an iPad to connect them with their family members. METHOD: Older people with dementia in two Canadian hospitals were observed and interviewed to explore their experiences of using an iPad. Focus groups were conducted with staff and interviews were undertaken with two frontline nurses and three research partners with lived experience of dementia in hospitalised older people. Data were thematically analysed in collaboration with 12 stakeholders. Strategies to overcome the barriers identified were tested as part of the study. FINDINGS: There were three main barriers to implementing virtual care interventions: lack of familiarity with the technology; difficulties with operating the device; and privacy and connectivity issues. Strategies to overcome these barriers included providing personalised support, working with users to support adaptation, and ensuring privacy and optimal connectivity. CONCLUSION: Using an iPad has the potential to enable hospitalised older people with dementia to connect with their family members and take part in activities that support person-centred care. This is particularly important in times, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, when restrictions to hospital visits lead to social isolation.

18.
Dementia (London) ; 19(5): 1346-1348, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-209646
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