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1.
Idowu Bolade Olawoye; Paul Eniola Oluniyi; Edyth Parker; Judith Uche Oguzie; Jessica Nnenna Uwanibe; Tolulope Adeyemi Kayode; Fehintola Victoria Ajogbasile; Testimony Jesupamilerin Olumade; Philomena Eromon; Priscilla Abechi; Tope Sobajo; Chinedu Ugwu; George Uwem; Femi Ayoade; Kazeem Akano; Oluwasemilogo Oluwasekunolami Akinlo; Julie Oreoluwa Akin-John; Nicholas Oyejide; Olubukola Ayo-Ale; Benjamin Adegboyega; Grace Chizaramu Chukwu; Ayomide Adeleke; Grace Opemipo Ezekiel; Farida Brimmo; Olanrewaju Odunyemi Fayemi; Iyanuoluwa Fred-Akintunwa; Ibrahim F. Yusuf; Testimony Oluwatise Ipaye; Oluwagboadurami John; Ahmed Iluoreh Muhammad; Deborah Chisom Nwodo; Olusola Akinola Ogunsanya; Johnson Okolie; Abolade Esther Omoniyi; Iyobosa Beatrice Omwanghe; Oludayo Oluwaseyi Ope-ewe; Shobi Otitoola; Kemi Adedotun-Suleiman; Courage Philip; Mudasiru Femi Saibu; Ayotunde Elijah Sijuwola; Christabel Anamuma Terkuma; Augustine Abu; Johnson Adekunle Adeniji; Moses Olubusuyi Adewunmi; Olufemi Oluwapelumi Adeyemi; Rahaman Ahmed; Anthony Ahumibe; Anthony Nnennaya Ajayi; Olusola Akanbi; Olatunji Akande; Monilade Akinola; Afolabi Akinpelu; George Akpede; Ekanem Anieno; Antjony E. Atage; Oyeronke Ayansola; Marycelin Baba; Olajumoke Babatunde; Bamidele Soji Oderinde; Ebo Benevolence; Osiemi Blessing; Mienye Bob-Manuel; Andrew Bock-Oruma; Aire Chris; Chimaobi Chukwu; Funmi Daramola; Adomeh Donatus; Rosemay Duruihuoma; Yerumoh Edna; Matthew Ekeh; Erim Ndoma; Richard Ewah; Akinwumi Fajola; Enoch Olowatosin Fakayode; Adeola Fowotade; Galadima Gadzama; Daniel Igwe; Odia Ikponmwosa; Rafiu Olasunkanmi Isamotu; Agbukor Jacqueline; Aiyepada John; Julie Johnson Ekpo; Ibrahim Kida; Nwando Mba; Airende Micheal; Mirabeau Youtchou Tatfeng; Worbianueri Beatrice Moore-Igwe; Anietie Moses; Okonofua Naregose; Nsikak-Abasi Ntia; Ifeanyi Nwafor; Elizabeth Odeh; Ephraim Ogbaini; Kingsley Chiedozie Ojide; Sylvanus Okogbenin; Peter Okokhere; Sylvanus Okoro; Azuka Okwuraiwe; Olisa Olasunkanmi; Oluseyi Olayinka; Adesuyi Omoare; Ewean Chukwuma Omoruyi; Hannah E. Omunakwe; Emeka Onwe Ogah; Chika Onwuamah; Venatious Onyia; Akhilomen Patience; Ebhodaghe Paulson; Omiunu Racheal; Esumeh Rita; Giwa Rosemary; Joseph Shaibu; Joseph Shaibu; Ehikhametalor Solomon; Ngozi Ugwu; Collins Nwachi Ugwu; Kingsley Ukwuaja; Zara Wudiri; Nnaemeka Ndodo; Brittany Petros; Bronwyn Mcannis; Cyril Oshomah; Femi Oladiji; Katherine J. Siddle; Rosemary Audu; Babatunde Lawal Salako; Stephen Schaffner; Danny Park; Ifedayo Adetifa; Chikwe Ihekweazu; Oyewale Tomori; Anise Nkenjop Happi; Onikepe Folarin; Kristian G. Andersen; Pardis C. Sabeti; Christian Tientcha Happi.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22280269

ABSTRACT

Identifying the dissemination patterns and impacts of a virus of economic or health importance during a pandemic is crucial, as it informs the public on policies for containment in order to reduce the spread of the virus. In this study, we integrated genomic and travel data to investigate the emergence and spread of the B.1.1.318 and B.1.525 variants of interest in Nigeria and the wider Africa region. By integrating travel data and phylogeographic reconstructions, we find that these two variants that arose during the second wave emerged from within Africa, with the B.1.525 from Nigeria, and then spread to other parts of the world. Our results show how regional connectivity in downsampled regions like Africa can often influence virus transmissions between neighbouring countries. Our findings demonstrate the power of genomic analysis when combined with mobility and epidemiological data to identify the drivers of transmission in the region, generating actionable information for public health decision makers in the region.

2.
Saudi Med J ; 43(8): 899-906, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994624

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection on erythropoiesis and red blood cells (RBC) surface markers by evaluating erythroid progenitor cells (CD [cluster of differentiation]71+/CD235a+) and RBC surface markers (CD235a and CD36), together with various hematological parameters. METHODS: This case-control study includes 47 participants recruited in the study: 30 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and 17 healthy individuals. The COVID-19 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit (ICU) of various hospitals in Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Blood samples were collected during July and September 2021. Red blood cells indices were measured using a CBC analyzer. The expression of CD235a, CD71, and CD36 was obtained using flow cytometry technique. The unpaired t-test was conducted to evaluate the differences in these markers in COVID-19 patients and healthy individuals. RESULTS: The data showed that more than half of the COVID-19 patients were anemic (64%). Expansion of erythroid progenitors (CD71+/CD235a+) was detected in the COVID-19 patients. Analysis of the expression of RBC surface markers, such as CD235a and CD36, showed that SARS-CoV-2 was associated with significantly higher expression of these markers in COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 promoted the expansion of erythroid progenitors in the peripheral blood of COVID-19 patients. In addition, the expression of RBC surface markers was higher in COVID-19 patients. The expansion of erythroid progenitors and alteration of RBC surface markers can contribute to erythrocytopathies observed in severe COVID-19 patients and can therefore be used as prognostic factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Erythroid Precursor Cells/metabolism , Erythropoiesis , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
International Journal of Agricultural Science, Research and Technology in Extension and Education Systems ; 11(3):173-179, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1887534

ABSTRACT

In the face of the unprecedented threat the world is faced with, caused by covid-19 pandemic which has affected health and disrupted the functioning of food system resulting in inadequate nutrition of many people around the world. The study examined the movement in the price of staple food commodities as a result of Covid-19 and its impact on food security of households in Kwara State, Nigeria. Primary data was used for the study and a convenient sampling technique was adopted in the selection of the respondents. A structured questionnaire was used for the purpose of extracting needed information from households selected for the study. The data were analyzed using with Descriptive Statistics, Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) and Correlation Analysis. The result showed that there was increase in price in all the major staple foods consumed during covid-19. Only 23% of the households were found to be food secure while 51% and 26% of all the households surveyed were found to be moderately and severely food insecure respectively. The effect of the increase in the price of staple commodity food on households food security was statistically significant (r = -0.375, p < 0.000) showing that movement in the prices of staple food has negative effect on food security of people. It is therefore recommended that there should be regulation of commodity food prices as this will enable medium and low income households to buy.

4.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 77(2):189-195, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1863914

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, now widely known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has caused 3 major pandemic waves in Malaysia. We aimed to identify the warning signs as indicators that predict the progression of disease. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of adult patients more than 12 years of age presenting with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 admitted in three separate hospitals around the country.

6.
Med J Malaysia ; 77(2):189-195, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1762271

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, now widely known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has caused 3 major pandemic waves in Malaysia. We aimed to identify the warning signs as indicators that predict the progression of disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of adult patients more than 12 years of age presenting with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 admitted in three separate hospitals around the country. RESULTS: Of the 228 patients initially admitted with mild illness, 47 had progressed requiring oxygen. The median time from admission to deterioration was 3 days (IQR 2 - 5). Age more than ≥50years old (median age = 42.5, IQR = 28.8 - 57.0), higher temperature (mean = 37.3, IQR 36.8 - 38.0), MEWS score >3 (9, 19.1%), Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >3.13 , (18, 38.3%) C-reactive protein (CRP) >5. (12, 27.3%), multiple zonal involvement on the chest radiography on admission (2, IQR 1-3) were more common in the deteriorated group on admission. On multivariate analysis, multiple comorbidities (HR = 7.40, 95 percent CI 2.58-21.2, p0.001), presence of persistent fever (HR = 2.88, 95 percent CI 1.15 - 7.2, p = 0.024), MEWS scoring >3 (HR of 6.72 ;95 percent CI 2.81-16.0, p0.001) were associated with progression to severe illness. CONCLUSION: In our cohort, we found that several factors were associated with the severity of COVID19. Early detection of these factors could correctly identify patients who need more intensive monitoring, and early referral for ICU care.

7.
Journal of Investigative Medicine ; 70(2):464-465, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1708499

ABSTRACT

Case Report SARS-CoV-2 Induced Pancreatitis Introduction SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for the ongoing pandemic and has been the cause of 4.7 million deaths and 233 million infections worldwide. Although it primarily attacks the respiratory system, the extrapulmonary targets of the virus include the gastrointestinal tract and hepatobiliary system, among others. We present a case of acute pancreatitis in a patient with SARS-CoV-2 infection without any other known causes. Case presentation A 55-year-old male with a past medical history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, 0.5 pack per day tobacco use for 30 years, and hyperlipidemia presents to the emergency department with a chief complaint of left precordial and epigastric sharp pain radiating to the back associated with nausea and vomiting. He denied shortness of breath, cough, fever, or chills. COVID PCR testing was positive on admission, and the patient had not received the COVID vaccine. Heart Rate- 82 beats per minute, Respiratory Rate- 22 per minute, Blood Pressure- 154/95 mmHg, 100% Oxygen Saturation on Room Air. Physical examination was significant for epigastric tenderness. Laboratory results: Lipase- 395U/L, Triglycerides-152 mg/dL, LDL-103 mg/dL, D-dimer- 0.67 mcg/mL. Normal troponin. CXR on admission showed mild patchy bibasilar infiltrates suggestive of developing pneumonia. Right upper quadrant abdominal ultrasound showed no gallstones or other abnormalities within the pancreatobiliary system. CT abdomen and chest with and without contrast showed evidence of acute pancreatitis and no other abnormalities. He was managed with intravenous fluids, pain management, and DVT prophylaxis and transitioned to a full liquid diet on hospital day four with lipase at 37U/L. He was discharged on hospital day five with full resolution of pancreatitis and COVID symptoms. Conclusion There is a limited but growing amount of literature supporting the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 induced viral pancreatitis. We worked up common causes of pancreatitis, and we do believe the patient presented with SARS-CoV-2 induced pancreatitis. About 1-2% of non-severe and 17% of severe cases of COVID have exhibited pancreatic injury. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the main target receptor of SARS-CoV-2. ACE2 is most abundantly expressed in the pulmonary sytem, but is also expressed in pancreatic cells as well as other cells in the gastrointestinal tract. This could explain a correlation between the virus and pancreatitis and other gastrointestinal symptoms. Although there is growing evidence of COVID-induced pancreatitis, the causal relationship is still debated between the two presentations.

8.
Kidney International Reports ; 7(2):S270, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1705141

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) delivers the best treatment dose prescribed for hemodialysis. KDOQI guideline 2006 advocate the adoption of ultrasound mapping for pre access creation. However, this is not translated to routine practice due to scarce resources. In this study, we wish to study the efficiency of clinical assessment in determining the suitable vessels for AVF creation and the access survival. Methods: This is a single tertiary nephrology center, prospective study of a series of patients who were referred to our AVF outsource program that was funded by Ministry of Health. This program diverting non Covid-19 CKD 5 or new ESKD patients that have opted for hemodialysis to private facilities for AVF creation due to the limitation of available operating theatre slot in government hospital attributed by Covid-19 pandemic. Those assessed by our nephrologists and trainees in a specially created outsourcing clinic that deemed suitable for assess creation will be outsource to the private institutions. Clinician assessment of suitability of the vessels and the outcome of AVF creations at 6 months were captured and analyzed. Results: A total of 147 patients were identified, reviewed, and outsourced, with the mean age of 54-year-old, male predominant (n: 94). 65% of the cohort has diabetes mellitus as their primary disease followed by hypertension at 17%. 37.4% of the cohort are CKD 5 patients who are not on dialysis, while 10.8% on peritoneal dialysis and 51.7% were on hemodialysis. 87% of the patients were AVF naïve whereas 13% had prior history of failed AVF. Out these, 15.6% of patients did not have access created (1 passed away, 7 needed complex grafts, 13 have small vessels, 2 needed two stages surgeries). Of the remaining 124 patients (84.4%), 2 received AVGs and 122 received AVFs. From the first subsequent vascular review by the surgeons, the concordance for the vascular access creation suitability with our assessment was 91.1%. Subsequently, the concordance for vascular access that was successfully created was 84.3% with site of creation agreement at 61%. At 6 months post AV access creation, 13 patients (10.5%) have primary failures whereas 11 patients (9%) had secondary failure. 21 patients (17%) unfortunately passed away during the study period and were excluded. At 6 months, 60% of the patients have functional AV access. In addition, for the 26 patients that have deemed no suitable vessels for AV access creation from prior vascular review before referred to our program, 84.6% has AV access created subsequently. Their outcome in 6 months includes: 36.3% have functional AV access, 18% have primary failure, 22.7% have secondary failure and another 22.7% passed away. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a careful clinical assessment of a patient’s vascular access by a nephrologist led team provides a high and consistent level of accuracy as to successfulness of the vascular creation. The omittance of routine vascular mapping in our protocol provide considerable cost and time saving which echoes the latest guideline by KDOQI 2019. Patients who failed assessment prior still warrant a repeat clinical assessment if they are considering hemodialysis as the life plan of kidney replacement therapy. No conflict of interest

11.
Kidney international reports ; 7(2):S399-S399, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1695301
12.
13.
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents ; 58:41-41, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1695221
19.
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society ; 81(OCE1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1671435
20.
AIMS Mathematics ; 7(4):5347-5385, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1626405

ABSTRACT

In this paper we use the technique of functional data analysis to model daily hospitalized, deceased, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) cases and return home patient numbers along the COVID-19 outbreak, considered as functional data across different departments in France while our response variables are numbers of vaccinations, deaths, infected, recovered and tests in France. These sets of data were considered before and after vaccination started in France. After smoothing our data set, analysis based on functional principal components method was performed. Then, a clustering using k-means techniques was done to understand the dynamics of the pandemic in different French departments according to their geographical location on France map. We also performed canonical correlations analysis between variables. Finally, we made some predictions to assess the accuracy of the method using functional linear regression models. © 2022 the Author(s), licensee AIMS Press.

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