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1.
Blood ; 138:2520, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582169

ABSTRACT

Updated analysis confirms sustained poor prognosis of COVID-19 in patients with lymphoma in Latin America: A cohort of 160 patients from GELL. Introduction: Ongoing SARS-COV-2 pandemic has impacted the management of cancer patients worldwide. Several reports have demonstrated inferior outcomes of patients with hematological malignancies, including higher rates of intensive care unit admission, need for mechanical ventilation and death. The impact of COVID-19 is profound in resource-restricted countries, including Latin America. Most cohorts reported have not included patients from Latin America, and there is paucity of data of the outcome of cancer patients with COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries. Grupo de Estudio De Linfoproliferativos En Latino-America (GELL )is a collaborative network of hematological centers in 13 countries in Latin America. We report updated outcomes of lymphoma patients diagnosed with COVID-19 in Latin America. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study including patients with a diagnosis of lymphoma and COVID-19 infection. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma were excluded from the analysis We defined active disease as follow: (1) patients with detectable disease either prior to initiating therapy or upon relapse, and/or (2) patients undergoing active cancer treatment. The primary outcome was overall survival at 100 days. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan Meier method. Uni and multivariable analysis were carried out with Cox model. Results: A total of 160 patients were available for analysis. Median age was 60 years old. Hypertension was the most common comorbidity (33%). Most patients had aggressive lymphomas (62%), including 43% of patients with diffuse large B-Cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Follicular lymphomas were observed in 13% of patients and Hodgkin lymphoma in 12.5% of patients. With a median follow-up of 37 days, the 100-day OS was 64% (95CI 56-74%, fig. 1). In univariate analysis, age (HR 1.03, p=0.0025), hypertension (HR 2.01, p=0.017), >1 number of prior lines (HR 2.78, p=0.011), patients currently on treatment (HR 1.83, p=0.043), ferritin >2000 ng/mL (HR 4.74 p=0.00047) were associated with inferior OS. In multivariate analysis, age (HR 1.03, p=0.0026) and patients currently on treatment (HR 1.82, p=0.04) had inferior OS. There was a trend towards inferior outcomes in patients receiving monoclonal antibodies in univariate analysis (HR 1.82, p=0.081) but not in multivariable analysis (HR=1.29, p=0.48). Use of steroids was not statistically related to mortality (HR 1.79, p=0.074). Finally, contrary to other cohorts, no improvement in OS was observed in patients diagnosed later on the pandemic (fig. 2). Conclusion: In this large cohort of Latin American patients with lymphoma malignancies, our updated analysis showed a maintained dismal prognosis with COVID-19 infection. With a median follow up of 37 days, the 100-day OS was 64%. Older age and ongoing active cancer treatment were significantly associated with mortality. The use of monoclonal antibodies and systemic corticosteroids were not statistically associated to poor survival. Current efforts are focused on improving immunization in the Latin American population. There is an unmet need for improving survival in patients with hematologic malignancies and COVID-19 infection. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Perini: Janssen: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Takeda: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Astra Zeneca: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;MSD: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau. Otero: ASTRA ZENECA: Current Employment. Abello: Dr Reddy's: Research Funding;Amgen: Honoraria;Janssen: Honoraria. Castillo: Abbvie: Consultancy, Research Funding;BeiGene: Consultancy, Research Funding;Pharmacyclics: Consultancy, Research Funding;Janssen: Consultancy;Roche: Consultancy;TG Therapeutics: Research Funding.

3.
Annals of Oncology ; 32:S1139-S1140, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1432871

ABSTRACT

Background: There are not specific information about otucomes of COVID-19 infection in patients with breast cancer. We aimed to describe the outcomes in this population in our national cohort of patients with cancer and infection for COVID-19. Methods: ACHOCC-19B registry is a multicenter observational study composed of a cross-sectional and a prospective cohort component. Eligibility criteria were the diagnosis of breast cancer and COVID-19 infection confirmed with RT-PCR. Follow-up of 30 days was completed. Clinical data were extracted of the multicentric register of cancer and covid-19 in Colombia (ACHOCC-19), collected from Apr 1 until Oct 31, 2020. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality from all causes and secondary outcome was asymptomatic disease. Associations between demographic or clinical characteristics and outcomes were measured with odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs using multivariable logistic regression. Results: 132 patients were included(18,5% of global ACHOCC-19 cohort). 18,2% died and 25,8% was asymptomatic. In relation to the patients who died vs did not died, 68 vs 66% were > 50 years, 20 vs 10,2% with obesity, 32 vs 51,4% without comorbidities: 24 vs 12% with Diabetes, 56 vs 29% arterial Hypertension, 17,75 vs 3.88% ECOG >2, 50 vs 12,5% progressive cancer, 20 vs 5,6% bacterial coinfection, 65 vs 25,2% received antibiotic and 68 vs 19% steroids for Covid-19 infection. 11.3% had severe infection and received ventilatory support and 66% died. About the asymptomatic patients 74% were > 50 years, 2,9% had obesity, 56% without comorbidities, 56% with ECOG 0 and 17,6% had metastatic disease. In the logistic regression analysis, age > 50 years (OR 2,7 95% 0,54-13,81), >2 comorbidities (OR 3,48 95% 0,26-45,71), progressive disease (OR 3,52 95% 0,47-26,57), steroids (OR 6,62 95% 1,5-26,6) and antibiotic treatment for Covid19 (OR 6,88 95% 1,60-29,76) behaved as a risk factors for mortality, but only steroids and antibiotic was statistically significant. Conclusions: In our study, breast cancer patients have high mortality by Covid-19 infection. Age, comorbidities, ECOG >2, progressive disease, and use of antibiotic and steroids are factors for worse prognosis. Legal entity responsible for the study: The authors. Funding: Has not received any funding. Disclosure: All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

4.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339262

ABSTRACT

Background: Cancer has been described as a risk factor for worse prognosis in people with Covid-19. However, there are few studies informing on the characteristics of cancer patients that have asymptomatic SARS-cov2 infection. The ACHOCC-19 study included asymptomatic patients. Methods: Analytical cohort study of patients with cancer and SARScov2 infection in Colombia. From April 1 to October 31, 2020, we collected data on demographic and clinical variables related to cancer and COVID-19 infection. We describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients who had no symptoms of COVID19. Association between outcomes and prognostic variables was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: We included 742 patients, of which 205 (27.6%) were asymptomatic. Of these 62.2% were older than 61 years, 66% were women, 1.42% were smokers. The most frequent malignancy was breast cancer (25%), followed by colon-rectum (14.6%), sarcoma/soft tissues (5.66%) and lung cancer (5.19%). Patients were more likely to be asymptomatic if they had fewer comorbidities (0-1 comorbidities: 84% asymptomatic, 2 comorbidities: 10.85%, more than 2 comorbidities: 5.15%). 90.5% lived in urban areas and 53.37% had low income. 35.4% of patients had metastatic disease, 8.7% had progressive cancer, 40% had stable disease or partial response. No patient had an ECOG PS of 4 or more, and only 1.91% had ECOG 3. In logistic regression analysis statistically significant associations for having symptomatic disease included: man, presence of 1, 2 or > 2 comorbidities, ECOG 1,2 or 3 and cancer in progression. On the other hand, the statistically significant ORs for having asymptomatic disease were age between 18 and 30 years old, cancer in remission and receiving non-cytotoxic treatment. Table sumarizes ORs and their respective 95% CIs of the variables adjusted in the logistic regression model. Conclusions: In our stumdy, cancer patients had a higher probability of asymptomatic COVID-19 infection if they were women, between the ages of 18 and 30 years, had cancer in remission , ECOG 0 and no comorbidities. This is the first cohort of patients with cancer and asymptomatic covid 19 with a significant sample size in Latin America.

5.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339182

ABSTRACT

Background: The severe acute respiratory syndrome 2 (SARS-cov-2) virus causing COVID19 has brought great challenges to global health services affecting cancer care delivery, outcomes, and increasing the burden in oncology providers (OP). Our study aimed to describe the challenges that OP faced while delivering cancer care in Latin America. Methods: We conducted an international crosssectional study using an anonymous online survey in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. The questionnaire included 43 multiple choice questions. The sample was stratified by OP who have treated patients with COVID-19 versus those who have not treated patients with COVID-19. Data was analyzed with descriptive statistics and Chi-square tests. Results: A total of 704 OP from 20 Latin American countries completed the survey (77% of 913 who started the survey). Oncologists represented 46% of respondents, followed by 25% surgicaloncologists. Of the respondents, 56% treated patients with COVID-19. A significant proportion of OP reported newly adopting telemedicine during COVID-19 (14% vs 72%, p=0.001). More than half (58%) of OP reported making changes to the treatments they offered to patients with cancer. As shown in the table, caring for patients with COVID-19 significantly influenced practice patterns of OP. Access to specialty services and procedures was significantly reduced: 40% noted significantly decreased or no access to imaging, 20% significantly decreased or no access to biopsies, 65% reported delays in surgical oncology referrals, and 49% in radiation oncology referrals. A vast majority (82%) reported oncologic surgeries were delayed or cancelled, which was heightened among those treating patients with COVID-19 (87% vs 77%, p=0.001). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected the way cancer care is delivered in globally. Although changes to healthcare delivery are necessary as a response to this global crisis, our study highlights the significant disruption and possible undertreatment of patients with cancer in Latin America that results from COVID-19.

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