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1.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(7):3907, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1762333

ABSTRACT

The effect of workplace infection control measures required by the COVID-19 pandemic on the association between long working hours and psychological distress has not yet been fully revealed. This study investigated the effect of requesting to stay home when sick (RSH) on the association between long working hours and psychological distress. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in December 2020 among participants who had previously registered with a Japanese web survey company. A total of 27,036 workers completed a self-administered questionnaire which assessed usual daily overtime work hours. RSH was assessed using an original single-item scale, while psychological distress was measured with the K6 scale. After the interaction effect of overtime work hours and RSH on psychological distress was tested, we conducted stratified analyses using RSH. The statistical analysis demonstrated a significant interaction effect (p for interaction < 0.001). When we conducted stratified analyses, the odds ratios increased with longer working hours, both with and without RSH groups;however, the risk of long working hours causing psychological distress was greater in the latter group (odds ratio = 1.95 [95% confidence interval: 1.62–2.36] than in the former group (odds ratio = 1.73 [95% confidence interval: 1.55–1.93]). We found that working without RSH could strengthen the association between long working hours and psychological distress. Our findings contribute to preventing the deterioration of mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330126

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Limited information is available about the association between workplace psychosocial factors and general mental health status among workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined how working from home affected the association between job demands and psychological distress (PD). Method A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in December 2020 (N=27,036). The dependent variable (PD) was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Job demands were assessed using the Job Content Questionnaire. Working from home was determined by participants' responses to the question: Do you currently work from home? We used a two-level regression analysis adjusted for prefecture;each individual-level variable at level 1 was nested into each prefecture at level 2, stratified by working from home or not. Results Overall, 21.3% of participants worked from home. The interaction between working from home and job demands was significant. Job demands were positively associated with PD. The stratified analysis showed the associations were weaker among employees who worked from home compared with those who did not. Conclusion The association between job demands and PD may be weakened by working from home.

3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 722071, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497171

ABSTRACT

Purpose: There is limited information about the association between workplace psychosocial factors and general worker mental health status during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the present study, we examined how anxiety about being infected by COVID-19 in the workplace affected the association between job demands and psychological distress (PD). Method: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in December 2020. The final analyzed sample was 27,036. The dependent variable of PD was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Job demands were assessed using the Job Content Questionnaire. Feelings of anxiety were assessed by participants' responses to the following question: "Do you feel anxiety about being infected by COVID-19 in the workplace?" We used a two-level regression adjusting for prefectural level: each individual-level variable at level 1 was nested into each prefecture at level 2, stratified by presence of anxiety. Results: A total of 50.5% of participants felt anxious about being infected by COVID-19 in the workplace. The interaction between anxiety and job demands was significant. Job demands were positively associated with PD. In the stratified analysis, the associations were stronger among employees who experienced anxiety about COVID-19 infection in the workplace than among those who did not. Conclusion: The association between job demands and PD may be strengthened by anxiety about COVID-19 infection in the workplace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Workplace
4.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12196, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Maternity harassment, known in English as pregnancy discrimination, remains prevalent in developed countries. However, research examining the mental health effects of maternity harassment is lacking. We aimed to examine the association between maternity harassment and depression during pregnancy in Japan. METHODS: A cross-sectional Internet survey was conducted on 359 pregnant employees (including women who were working at the time their pregnancy was confirmed) from May 22 to May 31, 2020, during which time a COVID-19 state of emergency was declared. Maternity harassment was defined as being subjected to any of the 16 adverse treatments prohibited by national guidelines. Depression was defined as a score of ≥9 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (Japanese version). Logistic regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Overall, 24.8% of the pregnant employees had experienced maternity harassment by supervisors and/or colleagues. After adjusting for demographics, pregnancy status, work status, and fear of COVID-19, pregnant employees who experienced maternity harassment were more likely to have depression than those who did not (odds ratio 2.48, 95% confidential interval 1.34-4.60). This association was not influenced by whether they were teleworking or not as a COVID-19 measure. CONCLUSIONS: One quarter of pregnant employees experienced maternity harassment and had a higher prevalence of depression than those who did not. Being physically away from the office through teleworking may not reduce the effect of maternal harassment on depression. To protect the mental health and employment of pregnant women, employers should comply with the laws and take measures to prevent maternity harassment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Depression/complications , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Pregnancy/psychology , Prejudice/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Employment/psychology , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Prejudice/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Surveys and Questionnaires
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