Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
J Atheroscler Thromb ; 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352901

ABSTRACT

AIM: We evaluated the delay in stroke reperfusion therapy between the pre-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) period and the with-COVID-19 period, and compared this delay between each phase of the with-COVID-19 period. METHODS: Patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) undergoing intravenous thrombolysis and/or mechanical thrombectomy were selected from our single-center prospective registry. The time to perform reperfusion therapy were compared between patients admitted from March 2019 to February 2020 (pre-COVID-19 group) and those from March 2020 to February 2021 (with-COVID-19 group). Patients in the with-COVID-19 group were further divided into three 4-month-long subgroups (first-phase: March to June 2020; second-phase: July to October 2020; third-phase: November 2020 to February 2021), and the time delay of reperfusion therapy were compared between these subgroups. RESULTS: Of 1,260 patients with AIS hospitalized in the study period, 265 patients were examined. Compared with the pre-COVID-19 group (133 patients; median age, 79 years), the with-COVID-19 group (132 patients; median age, 79 years) had a longer median door-to-imaging time (25 min vs. 27 min, P=0.04), and a longer door-to-groin puncture time (65 min vs. 72 min, P=0.02). In the three 4-month-long subgroups, the median door-to-needle time (49 min, 43 min, and 38 min, respectively; P=0.04) and door-to-groin puncture time (83 min, 70 min, and 61 min, P<0.01, respectively) decreased significantly during the with-COVID-19 period. CONCLUSIONS: The delay in reperfusion therapy increased during the with-COVID-19 period compared with the pre-COVID-19 period. However, the door-to-needle time and door-to-groin puncture time decreased as time elapsed during the with-COVID-19 period.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02251665.

2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105321, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872317

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted global healthcare systems and this may affect stroke care and outcomes. This study examines the changes in stroke epidemiology and care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Zanjan Province, Iran. METHODS: This study is part of the CASCADE international initiative. From February 18, 2019, to July 18, 2020, we followed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke hospitalization rates and outcomes in Valiasr Hospital, Zanjan, Iran. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model and an interrupted time series analysis (ITS) to identify changes in stroke hospitalization rate, baseline stroke severity [measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)], disability [measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS)], presentation time (last seen normal to hospital presentation), thrombolytic therapy rate, median door-to-needle time, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality. We compared in-hospital mortality between study periods using Cox-regression model. RESULTS: During the study period, 1,026 stroke patients were hospitalized. Stroke hospitalization rates per 100,000 population decreased from 68.09 before the pandemic to 44.50 during the pandemic, with a significant decline in both Bayesian [Beta: -1.034; Standard Error (SE): 0.22, 95% CrI: -1.48, -0.59] and ITS analysis (estimate: -1.03, SE = 0.24, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we observed lower admission rates for patients with mild (NIHSS < 5) ischemic stroke (p < 0.0001). Although, the presentation time and door-to-needle time did not change during the pandemic, a lower proportion of patients received thrombolysis (-10.1%; p = 0.004). We did not see significant changes in admission rate to the stroke unit and in-hospital mortality rate; however, disability at discharge increased (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In Zanjan, Iran, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted stroke outcomes and altered the delivery of stroke care. Observed lower admission rates for milder stroke may possibly be due to fear of exposure related to COVID-19. The decrease in patients treated with thrombolysis and the increased disability at discharge may indicate changes in the delivery of stroke care and increased pressure on existing stroke acute and subacute services. The results of this research will contribute to a similar analysis of the larger CASCADE dataset in order to confirm findings at a global scale and improve measures to ensure the best quality of care for stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Hospitalization/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bayes Theorem , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/mortality , Iran/epidemiology , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Recovery of Function , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
Rinsho Shinkeigaku ; 60(10): 706-711, 2020 Oct 24.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745654

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, an 81-year-old afebrile woman was transported to our institute at 44 minutes after she was found to have global aphasia and weakness of the right extremities. The onset time was unclear. CT showed an occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery without early ischemic changes. MRI revealed a negative fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pattern, in which several small acute infarcts were seen in diffusion-weighted images with no corresponding hyperintensity lesions on FLAIR. Accordingly, intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (0.6 mg/kg, the dose approved in Japan) was administered at 1,660 minutes after the last known well and 116 minutes after the symptom recognition. An immediate internal carotid angiogram showed severe stenosis at the distal end of the horizontal portion of the left middle cerebral artery. In the follow-up angiogram at 164 minutes after the symptom recognition, the stenotic lesion almost resolved with the restoration of quick and nearly complete antegrade flow. Her symptoms also resolved promptly. Although the use of MRI is recommended to be minimized in the emergency stroke management during the COVID-19 pandemic, MRI is occasionally mandatory for patient selection, such as cases with unclear onset to perform intravenous thrombolysis. The individualized protected code stroke is essential and must be well considered by each institute for diagnosing patients by selecting appropriate modalities.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/therapeutic use , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Time Factors , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage
4.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(9): 104938, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-210006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2), now named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), may change the risk of stroke through an enhanced systemic inflammatory response, hypercoagulable state, and endothelial damage in the cerebrovascular system. Moreover, due to the current pandemic, some countries have prioritized health resources towards COVID-19 management, making it more challenging to appropriately care for other potentially disabling and fatal diseases such as stroke. The aim of this study is to identify and describe changes in stroke epidemiological trends before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This is an international, multicenter, hospital-based study on stroke incidence and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will describe patterns in stroke management, stroke hospitalization rate, and stroke severity, subtype (ischemic/hemorrhagic), and outcomes (including in-hospital mortality) in 2020 during COVID-19 pandemic, comparing them with the corresponding data from 2018 and 2019, and subsequently 2021. We will also use an interrupted time series (ITS) analysis to assess the change in stroke hospitalization rates before, during, and after COVID-19, in each participating center. CONCLUSION: The proposed study will potentially enable us to better understand the changes in stroke care protocols, differential hospitalization rate, and severity of stroke, as it pertains to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ultimately, this will help guide clinical-based policies surrounding COVID-19 and other similar global pandemics to ensure that management of cerebrovascular comorbidity is appropriately prioritized during the global crisis. It will also guide public health guidelines for at-risk populations to reduce risks of complications from such comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Hospital Mortality/trends , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Incidence , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL