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2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314046

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report the eyelid myokymia in patients recovered from COVID-19 disease. Methods A cohort of 15 patients who developed eyelid myokymia during or immediate post-recovery of systemic disease were evaluated. Demographic, clinical characteristics, effect of age, and hospitalization on the disease course were studied. The disease course was evaluated every month for 3 months period. Results All, except 2, patients had complete resolution of lid myokymia within 3 months of onset. Mean ± SD myokymia recovery time was 44.1 ± 20.9 Days. Gender had no impact on the duration of disease. Age and duration of hospitalization had a strong positive correlation with myokymia recovery time (r = 0.8, p = 0.001 and r = 0.8, p = 0.01). Conclusion Eyelid myokymia may involve COVID-19 patients during or immediately after systemic recovery. While myokymia recovers gradually in all these patients;older age and longer duration of hospitalization are associated with slower recovery.

3.
SN Compr Clin Med ; 4(1): 29, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626327

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to report eyelid myokymia in patients recently recovered from COVID-19 disease. A cohort of 15 patients who developed eyelid myokymia during or immediate post-recovery of systemic disease were evaluated. Demographic, clinical characteristics, effect of age, and hospitalization on the disease course were studied. The disease course was evaluated every month for 3 months period. All, except 2, patients had complete resolution of lid myokymia within 3 months of onset. Median [IQR] myokymia recovery time was 42 [31,60] days. Age and duration of hospitalization had a significant linear relationship with myokymia recovery time. Recovery was delayed by 2.64 days with every 1-year increment in age and by 6.19 days with every additional day of hospital stay. Recovery time was independent of severity of systemic disease (P = .055) and gender (P = 0.2). Eyelid myokymia can be a possible manifestation of COVID-19 recovery phase. While myokymia recovers gradually in all these patients, older age and a longer duration of hospitalization are associated with slower recovery.

4.
SN comprehensive clinical medicine ; 4(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1615206

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to report eyelid myokymia in patients recently recovered from COVID-19 disease. A cohort of 15 patients who developed eyelid myokymia during or immediate post-recovery of systemic disease were evaluated. Demographic, clinical characteristics, effect of age, and hospitalization on the disease course were studied. The disease course was evaluated every month for 3 months period. All, except 2, patients had complete resolution of lid myokymia within 3 months of onset. Median [IQR] myokymia recovery time was 42 [31,60] days. Age and duration of hospitalization had a significant linear relationship with myokymia recovery time. Recovery was delayed by 2.64 days with every 1-year increment in age and by 6.19 days with every additional day of hospital stay. Recovery time was independent of severity of systemic disease (P = .055) and gender (P = 0.2). Eyelid myokymia can be a possible manifestation of COVID-19 recovery phase. While myokymia recovers gradually in all these patients, older age and a longer duration of hospitalization are associated with slower recovery.

5.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S383-S383, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1602076

ABSTRACT

Background Tocilizumab is an interleukin-6 monoclonal antibody with widespread use in rheumatologic conditions. Observational studies have shown a promising role of Tocilizumab in severe COVID-19 patients with cytokine storm syndrome. Data about tocilizumab use in pregnant patients is limited. We report two outcomes of two pregnant patients with COVID-19 in the second trimester who received tocilizumab Methods A 24-year-old 20 weeks pregnant lady with a history of asthma and gestational diabetes mellitus presented with three days history of fever, cough and shortness of breath (Figure 1). She was clinically stable but later developed ARDS and developed increased oxygen demand up to 10 liters/min. She received Tocilizumab on. Patient was observed in a high dependency unit but did not require mechanical ventilation. Patient was discharged home with full recovery and later delivered a healthy baby. Timeline of medicines used during hospital (Figure 2). Case 2: 39-year-old 23 weeks pregnant lady presented with seven days history of fever cough and shortness of breath (Figure 1). On presentation, she had progressive worsening hypoxic respiratory failure and was intubated. Patient had her nasopharyngeal swab for CODI-19 RT PCR was positive. The patient had severe ARDS requiring ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) for respiratory support. Tocilizumab 400 mg was given on the presentation, along with other medications (Figure 3). Patient had regular monitoring of fetus;however, she had intrauterine fetal demise on day 14. Patient It is unclear if IUFD was due to using of tocilizumab or severity of COVID19 itself. The patient stayed in ICU for 20 days and was discharged after full recovery. Figure 1. Case 1 treatment timeline. Abberviations: Azithro: Azithromycin, HCQ: Hydroxychloroquine, CQ: Chloroquine, LPV/r: lopinavir/Ritonavir, Osel: Oseltamivir, MP: Methylprednisolone, Ampi-sulb: Ampicillin-sulbactam, TCZ: tocilizumab Figure 2. Case 2 treatment timeline Results Learning points: Tocilizumab use in pregnant patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia during the second trimester improved maternal outcomes in our cases. Tocilizumab use may be associated with worse fetal outcomes, including intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD). Figure 3. Table of clinical characteristics, pregnant outcomes. Abbreviations: LRTI: lower respiratory tract infection, HCQ: Hydroxychloroquine, CQ: chloroquine, Osel: Oseltamivir, Cef: Ceftrixone, Ampi-Sulb: ampicillin-sulbactam, Azithro: Azithromycin, TCZ: tocilizumab, MP: methylpredinisolone, H/O: History of, LSCS: C-section, NA: not available. Pip-tazo: Piperacillin-tazobactam, Mero: Meropenem, Sulfa-trim: Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim, IUFD: Intrauterine fetal death. Conclusion The pharmacological management of pregnant patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia poses significant challenges. The use of Tocilizumab may improve maternal outcomes but may also increase the risk of worse fetal outcomes. Caution should be exercised in using this agent, and risks and benefits should be discussed with the patients. Disclosures All Authors: No reported disclosures

6.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(46): 7995-8009, 2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580316

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus most commonly presents with respiratory symptoms. While gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations either at presentation or during hospitalization are also common, their impact on clinical outcomes is controversial. Some studies have described worse outcomes in COVID-19 patients with GI symptoms, while others have shown either no association or a protective effect. There is a need for consistent standards to describe GI symptoms in COVID-19 patients and to assess their effect on clinical outcomes, including mortality and disease severity. AIM: To investigate the prevalence of GI symptoms in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and their correlation with disease severity and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 601 consecutive adult COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization between May 1-15, 2020. GI symptoms were recorded at admission and during hospitalization. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and treatment data were retrieved. Clinical outcomes included all-cause mortality, disease severity at presentation, need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission, development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and need for mechanical ventilation. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify independent predictors of the adverse outcomes. RESULTS: The prevalence of any GI symptom at admission was 27.1% and during hospitalization was 19.8%. The most common symptoms were nausea (98 patients), diarrhea (76 patients), vomiting (73 patients), and epigastric pain or discomfort (69 patients). There was no difference in the mortality between the two groups (6.21% vs 5.5%, P = 0.7). Patients with GI symptoms were more likely to have severe disease at presentation (33.13% vs 22.5%, P < 0.001) and prolonged hospital stay (15 d vs 14 d, P = 0.04). There was no difference in other clinical outcomes, including ICU admission, development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, or need for mechanical ventilation. Drugs associated with the development of GI symptoms during hospitalization were ribavirin (diarrhea 26.37% P < 0.001, anorexia 17.58%, P = 0.02), hydroxychloroquine (vomiting 28.52%, P = 0.009) and lopinavir/ritonavir (nausea 32.65% P = 0.049, vomiting 31.47% P = 0.004, and epigastric pain 12.65% P = 0.048). In the multivariate regression analysis, age > 65 years was associated with increased mortality risk [odds ratio (OR) 7.53, confidence interval (CI): 3.09-18.29, P < 0.001], ICU admission (OR: 1.79, CI: 1.13-2.83, P = 0.012), and need for mechanical ventilation (OR: 1.89, CI:1.94-2.99, P = 0.007). Hypertension was an independent risk factor for ICU admission (OR: 1.82, CI:1.17-2.84, P = 0.008) and need for mechanical ventilation (OR: 1.66, CI: 1.05-2.62, P = 0.028). CONCLUSION: Patients with GI symptoms are more likely to have severe disease at presentation; however, mortality and disease progression is not different between the two groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Digestive System , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Qatar/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Qatar Med J ; 2021(2): 23, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical data on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are limited. We herein report the initial clinical experience with COVID-19 in SOT recipients in Qatar. METHODS: All SOT recipients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 up to May 23, 2020 were included. Demographic and clinical data were extracted retrospectively from the hospital's electronic health records. Categorical data are presented as frequency and percentages, while continuous variables are summarized as medians and ranges. RESULTS: Twenty-four SOT recipients with COVID-19 were identified (kidney 16, liver 6, heart 1, and liver and kidney 1). Organ transplantation preceded COVID-19 by a median of 60 months (range 1.7-184). The median age was 57 years (range 24-72), and 9 (37.5%) transplant recipients were females. Five (21%) asymptomatic patients were diagnosed through proactive screening. For the rest, fever (15/19) and cough (13/19) were the most frequent presenting symptoms. Five (20.8%) patients required invasive mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit (ICU). Eleven (46%) patients developed acute kidney injury, including three in association with drug-drug interactions involving investigational COVID-19 therapies. Maintenance immunosuppressive therapy was modified in 18 (75%) patients, but systemic corticosteroids were not discontinued in any. After a median follow-up of 226 days (26-272), 20 (83.3%) patients had been discharged home, 2 (8.3%) were still hospitalized, 1 (4.2%) was still in the ICU, and 1 (4.2%) had died. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that asymptomatic COVID-19 is possible in SOT recipients and that overall outcomes are not uniformly worse than those in the general population. The results require confirmation in large, international cohorts.

8.
Pakistan Armed Forces Medical Journal ; _(COVID-19 (1)), 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1380275

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives: To determine agreement between clinical features of sciatica and 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging findings. Study Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study : Department of Orthopedics, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Nov 2017 to May 2018. Methodology: A total of 90 patients with low back pain radiating to one or both lower limbs and age 25-75 years of either gender were included. Patients with tumors of spine or vertebrae, trauma to spine, Pott's disease and previous spinal surgery were excluded. Patients with clinically diagnosed sciatica were taken for magnetic resonance imaging on a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging console and images of lumbosacral spine were obtained by a qualified magnetic resonance imaging technician. The images were transferred to computers on reporting station and findings analyzed on vitrea. Reports were prepared according to the findings of magnetic resonance imaging. Agreement was measured if clinical features were positive(positive straight leg raise test) and magnetic resonance imaging showing any feature of disc herniation, disc prolapse and neural foramen narrowing. Results: Mean age was 53.11 ± 8.13 years. Out of these 90 patients, 46(51.11%) were males and 44(48.89%) were females with ratio of 1.1:1. In my study, numbers of observed agreements were 78(86.67% of the observations) with Kappa value of 0.717(95% confidence interval: from 0.568 to 0.865). The strength of agreement between clinical features of sciatica and 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging findings is considered to be 'good'. Conclusion: This study concluded that there is a good agreement between clinical features of sciatica and 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging findings. Careful clinical evaluation will help the clinicians for avoiding unnecessary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with sciatica.

10.
Acta Biomed ; 91(4): e2020165, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059616

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Eosinophils can be considered as multifunctional leukocytes that contribute to various physiological and pathological processes depending on their location and activation status. There are emerging eosinophil-related considerations concerning COVID-19. Variable eosinophil counts have been reported during COVID-19. Whether these changes are related to the primary disease process or due to immunomodulation induced by the treatment has not yet been elucidated. AIM OF THE STUDY: To describe changes in the differential leukocyte counts including eosinophils, in a cohort of symptomatic patients with confirmed COVID-19 and to correlate these changes, if any, with the severity of the disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We recorded the clinical data, lab findings, including inflammatory markers and leukocyte and differential count, course of the disease and severity score in 314 confirmed symptomatic cases of COVID-19. RESULTS: Laboratory tests revealed that 28.7 % (n =86) had mild eosinophilia (eosinophil count > 500 <1,500/µL). Thirty-four patients (11.3%) had elevated absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (>8,000/µL), and 7 (2.3%) had decreased ANC (< 1,500/µl). Seven patients (2.3%) had lymphopenia (<1,000/µL) and 4 (4.67%) had lymphocytosis (> 4,000/µL). C-reactive protein (CRP) was elevated in 83 patients (27.6%). Chest X-Ray changes included: increased broncho vascular markings (38%), ground-glass opacity (GGO) pneumonitis (19.3%), lobar consolidation (5%), bronchopneumonia (8.3%), nodular opacity (1%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (2.3%), pleural effusion (1.0%) and other atypical findings (6.6%). Patients with eosinophilia had significantly lower CRP, and lower % of GGO, lobar and bronchopneumonia and ARDS in their chest images compared to patients without eosinophilia (p: <0.05). They also had a lower requirement for a hospital stay, ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and oxygen supplementation versus patients without eosinophilia (p: <0.05). The eosinophils count was correlated negatively with the duration of ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and oxygen supplementation and with CRP level (r: - 0.34, -0.32, -0.61 and - 0.39, respectively) (p: < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our study reports a relatively high prevalence of eosinophilia in symptomatic COVID-19 positive patients. Patients with eosinophilia had a lower level of CRP, milder clinical course and better disease outcomes compared to those without eosinophilia. Our findings indicated a protective role of eosinophils in mitigating the severity of inflammatory diseases through an inhibitory mechanism, as evidenced by lower CRP. This protective role of eosinophils needs to be validated by further prospective studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Eosinophilia/complications , Adult , COVID-19/blood , Eosinophilia/blood , Eosinophils , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Research Design , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Acta Biomed ; 91(3): e2020010, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761250

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a scarcity of data regarding the effect of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and associated comorbidities on the clinical presentation and outcome of symptomatic patients with -COVID-19 infection in comparison with non-diabetic patients. AIM OF THE STUDY: We described and compared the clinical presentation and radiological and hematological data of a cohort of symptomatic COVID19 positive T2DM diabetic patients (n = 59) versus another cohort of non-diabetic symptomatic COVID19 positive patients (n =244) diagnosed at the same time from January 2020 to May 2020. Associated comorbidities were -assessed, and the Charlson Comorbidity Index was calculated. The outcomes including duration of hospitalization, duration of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and duration of O2 -supplementation were assessed. RESULTS: Prevalence of T2DM in symptomatic COVID19 positive patients was 59/303 (=19.5%).  Diabetic patients had higher prevalence of hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiac dysfunction [coronary heart disease (CHD)], and congestive heart failure (CHF). Charlson Comorbidity score was significantly higher in the T2DM patients (2.4± 1.6) versus the non-diabetic -patients (0.28 ± 0.8; p: < 0.001). Clinically and radiologically, T2DM patients had significantly higher percentage of pneumonia, severe pneumonia and ARDS versus the non-diabetic patients. Hematologically, diabetic patients had significantly higher C-reactive protein (CRP), higher absolute neutrophilic count (ANC) and lower counts of lymphocytes and eosinophils compared to non-diabetic patients. They had significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, longer duration of hospitalization, ICU stay, mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy. CRP was correlated significantly with the duration of stay in the ICU and the duration for oxygen supplementation (r = 0.37 and 0.42 respectively; p: <0.01). CONCLUSIONS: T2DM patients showed higher inflammatory response to COVID 19 with higher absolute neutrophilic count (ANC) and CRP with lower lymphocytic and eosinophilic counts. Diabetic patients had more comorbidities and more aggressive course of the disease with higher rate of ICU admission and longer need for hospitalization and oxygen use.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Prevalence , Qatar/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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