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1.
Stroke ; 51(7):2002-2011, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2287355

ABSTRACT

Background and Purpose: With the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during the current worldwide pandemic, there is mounting evidence that patients affected by the illness may develop clinically significant coagulopathy with thromboembolic complications including ischemic stroke. However, there is limited data on the clinical characteristics, stroke mechanism, and outcomes of patients who have a stroke and COVID-19. Method(s): We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients with ischemic stroke who were hospitalized between March 15, 2020, and April 19, 2020, within a major health system in New York, the current global epicenter of the pandemic. We compared the clinical characteristics of stroke patients with a concurrent diagnosis of COVID-19 to stroke patients without COVID-19 (contemporary controls). In addition, we compared patients to a historical cohort of patients with ischemic stroke discharged from our hospital system between March 15, 2019, and April 15, 2019 (historical controls). Result(s): During the study period in 2020, out of 3556 hospitalized patients with diagnosis of COVID-19 infection, 32 patients (0.9%) had imaging proven ischemic stroke. Cryptogenic stroke was more common in patients with COVID-19 (65.6%) as compared to contemporary controls (30.4%, P=0.003) and historical controls (25.0%, P<0.001). When compared with contemporary controls, COVID-19 positive patients had higher admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and higher peak D-dimer levels. When compared with historical controls, COVID-19 positive patients were more likely to be younger men with elevated troponin, higher admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Patients with COVID-19 and stroke had significantly higher mortality than historical and contemporary controls. Conclusion(s): We observed a low rate of imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Most strokes were cryptogenic, possibly related to an acquired hypercoagulability, and mortality was increased. Studies are needed to determine the utility of therapeutic anticoagulation for stroke and other thrombotic event prevention in patients with COVID-19.Copyright © 2020 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. All rights reserved.

2.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925289

ABSTRACT

Objective: To further characterize the relationship between markers of inflammation and outcome in patients undergoing mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke. Background: Inflammation and infection after ischemic stroke are known to exacerbate tissue injury and worsen clinical outcome. Thrombectomy has become standard of care in stroke, but little data exist regarding how inflammation affects outcome after thrombectomy. Design/Methods: We performed retrospective chart review of stroke patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy at 2 tertiary academic centers between December 2018 and November 2020. The relationship between discharge mortality, admission WBC count, admission neutrophil percentage, peak WBC count, and fever (peak temperature >38°C) were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test, Student's t-test, and Fisher's exact test. Multivariable analysis was performed to test for independent predictors of discharge mortality. Analyses were performed for the entire cohort, then repeated in a cohort excluding COVIDpositive patients. Results: Of 254 patients who had thrombectomy for acute stroke, 42 (16.5%) died prior to discharge. Mortality was associated with admission WBC count (10.7 [8.9-14] vs. 8.6 [7-12], p=0.0064), admission neutrophil percentage (78% ± 11 vs. 70% ± 14, p=0.0001), peak WBC count (17 [13-22] vs. 12 [8.9-15], p<0.0001), and fever (71% vs. 29%, p<0.0001). In multivariable analysis, admission WBC count (OR 14, CI 1.5-158, p=0.024), neutrophil percentage (OR 1.04, CI 1.0-1.1, p=0.039), peak WBC count (OR 343, CI 27-5702, p<0.0001) and fever (OR 8.6, CI 3.6-23, p<0.0001) were significantly predictive of discharge mortality after controlling for age, admission NIHSS and post-thrombectomy ASPECTS score. Fifteen patients tested positive for COVID-19. In analyses excluding these patients, peak WBC count and fever remained independent predictors of discharge mortality. Conclusions: Elevated markers of inflammation during hospitalization predict discharge mortality in patients who undergo mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke. Further study is warranted to investigate causation and identify opportunities to improve quality of care in this patient population.

3.
Dokkyo Journal of Medical Sciences ; 48(3):277-282, 2021.
Article in Japanese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1738204

ABSTRACT

At the beginning of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there was a tendency to refrain from undertaking pathological autopsies, although they are now being performed as usual. However, the risk of infection is high in pathology departments because of the handling of unfixed specimens. Infection control measures for autopsies are based on standard precautions, and biosafety level 2 or higher is recommended as the minimum requirement. While contact and droplet infections can be prevented by wearing personal protective equipment (PPE), airborne infections caused by tuberculosis, measles, and varicella require the maintenance of ventilation facilities and the use of N95 masks or powered air-purifying respirators. In a COVID-19 autopsy, measures against airborne infections are required in addition to standard precautions, as with tuberculosis. If these measures are taken, the risk of infection to pathologists and technicians is low and they are not estimated as close contacts. Currently, when COVID-19 is not suspected clinically, autopsies are performed using standard precautions after consultation between the pathologist and the clinician in charge. Therefore, as with other infectious diseases, infection information from the department is critical. We must collaborate with each department if we perform autopsies with appropriate infection control measures. © 2021, Dokkyo University School of Medicine. All rights reserved.

4.
Stroke ; 52(SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1234365

ABSTRACT

Introduction: While the thrombotic complications of COVID-19 have been described, there are limited data on its implications in hemorrhagic stroke. The clinical characteristics, underlying stroke mechanism, and outcomes in this group of patients are especially salient as empiric therapeutic anticoagulation becomes increasingly common in the treatment and prevention of thrombotic complications of COVID-19. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with hemorrhagic stroke (both nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage and spontaneous non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage) who were hospitalized between 3/1/20-5/15/20 at a NYC hospital system, during the coronavirus pandemic. We compared the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with hemorrhagic stroke and COVID-19 to those without COVID-19 admitted to our hospital between 3/1/20-5/15/20 (contemporary controls) and 3/1/19-5/15/19 (historical controls), using Fischer's exact test and nonparametric testing. We adjusted for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method. Results: During the study period, 19 out of 4071 (0.5%) patients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 had hemorrhagic stroke on imaging. Of all COVID-19 with hemorrhagic stroke, only 3 had non-aneurysmal SAH without intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Among hemorrhagic stroke and COVID-19 patients, coagulopathy was the most common etiology (73.7%);empiric anticoagulation was started in 89.5% vs 4.2% of contemporary and 10.0% of historical controls (both with p = <0.001). Compared to contemporary and historical controls, COVID-19 patients had higher initial NIHSS scores, INR, PTT and fibrinogen levels. These patients also had higher rates of in-hospital mortality [84.6% vs. 4.6%, p =<0.001]. Sensitivity analyses excluding patients with strictly subarachnoid hemorrhage yielded similar results. Conclusion: We observed an overall low rate of imaging-confirmed hemorrhagic stroke among patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Most hemorrhages in COVID-19 patients occurred in the setting of therapeutic anticoagulation and were associated with increased mortality. Further studies are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of therapeutic anticoagulation in COVID-19 patients.

5.
Stroke ; 52(SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1234356

ABSTRACT

Introduction: While coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with acute ischemic stroke (AIS), the causal relationship has yet to be elucidated. Factors that likely confer increased stroke risk are COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and hyperinflammatory response. Studying clinical features of patients with otherwise undetermined cause of AIS could help better define COVID-19-associated stroke. Methods: We performed a multicenter cross-sectional study of consecutive patients presenting with AIS and COVID-19 to one of two large healthcare systems in New York City during the local COVID- 19 surge from March 1, 2020 to May 31, 2020. In-hospital stroke cases were excluded. We compared demographic and clinical features of patients with COVID-19 and a cryptogenic AIS subtype to patients with COVID-19 and a determined subtype. Baseline characteristics and clinical variables were compared using chi-squared and Fisher exact tests. Results: A total of 62 patients with AIS and COVID-19 at the time of hospital arrival were identified. Of these, 30 were classified as having a cryptogenic subtype (80% after complete diagnotics evaluation), and 32 had an identifiable stroke mechanism. Patients with cryptogenic AIS were significantly younger (p=0.011) and less likely to have co-morbid hypertension (p=0.019), coronary artery disease (p=0.024), heart failure (p=0.039), atrial fibrillation (<0.0001), and prior stroke or TIA (p=0.033) compared to those with defined mechanisms. Further, d-dimer, but not C-reactive protein, was significantly higher in patients with cryptogenic stroke compared to those with defined causes (p=0.009). Conclusion: Patients with AIS in the setting of COVID-19 and no other determined stroke mechanism were younger, less likely to have classic risk factors, and had higher d-dimer levels when compared to those with a determined mechanism. Further study of COVID-19-associated hypercoagulability as a mechanism of stroke is warranted.

6.
Public Health ; 188: 51-53, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712115

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to show that social distancing is a public good under the COVID-19 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: We apply economic theory to analyse a cross-sectional survey. METHODS: Economic theory is complemented with empirical evidence. An online survey of those aged 30-49 years in Japan (n = 2177) was conducted between April 28 and May 7. Respondents were selected by quota sampling with regard to age group, gender and prefecture of residence. Our main figure shows the proportion of people who increased/did not change/decreased social distancing, relative to the level of altruism and sensitivity to public shaming. The results of OLS and logit models are shown in Supplementary Materials. RESULTS: Social distancing is a public good under the COVID-19 pandemic for which the free-rider problem is particularly severe. Altruism and social norms are crucial factors in overcoming this problem. Using an original survey, we show that people with higher altruistic concerns and sensitivity to shaming are more likely to follow social distancing measures. CONCLUSIONS: Altruism and social norms are important for reducing the economic cost of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Altruism , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Psychological Distance , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Norms , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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