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1.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-331791

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccines based on the Wuhan strain of SARS-CoV-2 are a cornerstone of the global management of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, variants of concern have continuously evolved and may erode previously induced immunity. This study aimed to determine risk of breakthrough infection in a fully vaccinated cohort. Methods: Participants were enrolled before their first SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and SARS-CoV-2 anti-spike IgG levels were measured after 21–28, 90 and 180 days of follow-up, as well as day -7 and 28 after booster vaccination. Rate of breakthrough infections were ascertained from two weeks after the second vaccine dose, and captured through the Danish National Microbiology database. Poisson regression analysis was used to determine the risk of breakthrough infection at time-updated anti-spike IgG levels after adjustment for age, sex, being health care worker, and time-updated SARS-CoV-2 transmission level. Findings: Among 6076 participants (median age 64 years, interquartile range 55–75) included in this analysis, breakthrough infections due to the Delta variant were observed in 127 participants and in 363 due to the Omicron variant. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for breakthrough infection with the Delta variant decreased with higher levels of anti-spike IgG yielding an IRR of 0.28 (95% CI 0·15–0·55) when comparing the highest and lowest quintiles of anti-spike IgG. For the Omicron variant, no significant differences in IRR of breakthrough infection between quintiles of anti-spike IgG was observed. Notably, 1 of 127 (0·8%) SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant and 0 of 336 (0%) Omicron variant breakthrough infections resulted in severe COVID-19. Interpretation: We observed a strong association between increasing levels of anti-spike antibodies and reduced risk of breakthrough infections with the Delta but not the Omicron variant. However, despite a high proportion of elderly participants, severe COVID-19 was rare in both Delta and Omicron infections.

2.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 1614, 2022 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764178

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are crucial in controlling COVID-19, but knowledge of which factors determine waning immunity is limited. We examined antibody levels and T-cell gamma-interferon release after two doses of BNT162b2 vaccine or a combination of ChAdOx1-nCoV19 and BNT162b2 vaccines for up to 230 days after the first dose. Generalized mixed models with and without natural cubic splines were used to determine immunity over time. Antibody responses were influenced by natural infection, sex, and age. IgA only became significant in naturally infected. A one-year IgG projection suggested an initial two-phase response in those given the second dose delayed (ChAdOx1/BNT162b2) followed by a more rapid decrease of antibody levels. T-cell responses correlated significantly with IgG antibody responses. Our results indicate that IgG levels will drop at different rates depending on prior infection, age, sex, T-cell response, and the interval between vaccine injections. Only natural infection mounted a significant and lasting IgA response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 757197, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485060

ABSTRACT

The recent identification and rise to dominance of the P.1 and B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 variants have brought international concern because they may confer fitness advantages. The same three positions in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) are affected in both variants, but where the 417 substitution differs, the E484K/N501Y have co-evolved by convergent evolution. Here we characterize the functional and immune evasive consequences of the P.1 and B.1.351 RBD mutations. E484K and N501Y result in gain-of-function with two different outcomes: The N501Y confers a ten-fold affinity increase towards ACE-2, but a modest antibody evasion potential of plasma from convalescent or vaccinated individuals, whereas the E484K displays a significant antibody evasion capacity without a major impact on affinity. On the other hand, the two different 417 substitutions severely impair the RBD/ACE-2 affinity, but in the combined P.1 and B.1.351 RBD variants, this effect is partly counterbalanced by the effect of the E484K and N501Y. Our results suggest that the combination of these three mutations is a two-step forward and one step back in terms of viral fitness.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Mutation, Missense , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination , Adult , Amino Acid Substitution , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
4.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0090421, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476401

ABSTRACT

Most individuals seroconvert after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but being seronegative is observed in 1 to 9%. We aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with being seronegative following PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. In a prospective cohort study, we screened health care workers (HCW) in the Capital Region of Denmark for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. We performed three rounds of screening from April to October 2020 using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method targeting SARS-CoV-2 total antibodies. Data on all participants' PCR for SARS-CoV-2 RNA were captured from national registries. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models were applied to investigate the probability of being seronegative and the related risk factors, respectively. Of 36,583 HCW, 866 (2.4%) had a positive PCR before or during the study period. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 866 HCW was 42 (31 to 53) years, and 666 (77%) were female. After a median of 132 (range, 35 to 180) days, 21 (2.4%) of 866 were seronegative. In a multivariable model, independent risk factors for being seronegative were self-reported asymptomatic or mild infection hazard ratio (HR) of 6.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6 to 17; P < 0.001) and body mass index (BMI) of ≥30, HR 3.1 (95% CI, 1.1 to 8.8; P = 0.039). Only a few (2.4%) HCW were not seropositive. Asymptomatic or mild infection as well as a BMI above 30 were associated with being seronegative. Since the presence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 reduces the risk of reinfection, efforts to protect HCW with risk factors for being seronegative may be needed in future COVID-19 surges. IMPORTANCE Most individuals seroconvert after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but negative serology is observed in 1 to 9%. We found that asymptomatic or mild infection as well as a BMI above 30 were associated with being seronegative. Since the presence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 reduces the risk of reinfection, efforts to protect HCW with risk factors for being seronegative may be needed in future COVID-19 surges.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Denmark , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Viral/analysis , Seroconversion , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
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