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1.
Antiviral Research ; 201:N.PAG-N.PAG, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1814106

ABSTRACT

Monoclonal antibody therapy is a promising option for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and a cocktail of antibodies (REGN-COV) has been administered to infected patients with a favorable outcome. However, it is necessary to continue generating novel sets of monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing activity because viral variants can emerge that show resistance to the currently utilized antibodies. Here, we isolated a new cocktail of antibodies, EV053273 and EV053286, from peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from convalescent patients infected with wild-type SARS-CoV-2. EV053273 exerted potent antiviral activity against the Wuhan wild-type virus as well as the Alpha and Delta variants in vitro , whereas the antiviral activity of EV053286 was moderate, but it had a wide-range of suppressive activity on the wild-type virus as well as the Alpha, Beta, Delta, Kappa, Omicron BA.1, and BA.2 variants. With the combined use of EV053273 and EV053286, we observed similar inhibitory effects on viral replication as with REGN-COV in vitro. We further assessed their activity in vivo by using a mouse model infected with a recently established viral strain with adopted infectious activity in mice. Independent experiments revealed that the combined use of EV053273 and EV053286 or the single use of each monoclonal antibody efficiently blocked infection in vivo. Together with data showing that these two monoclonal antibodies could neutralize REGN-COV escape variants and the Omicron variant, our findings suggest that the EV053273 and EV053286 monoclonal antibody cocktail is a novel clinically applicable therapeutic candidate for SARS-CoV-2 infection. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Antiviral Research is the property of Elsevier B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

2.
Med (N Y) ; 3(4): 249-261.e4, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783638

ABSTRACT

Background: The immune profile against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has dramatically diversified due to a complex combination of exposure to vaccines and infection by various lineages/variants, likely generating a heterogeneity in protective immunity in a given population. To further complicate this, the Omicron variant, with numerous spike mutations, has emerged. These circumstances have created the need to assess the potential of immune evasion by Omicron in individuals with various immune histories. Methods: The neutralization susceptibility of the variants, including Omicron and their ancestors, was comparably assessed using a panel of plasma/serum derived from individuals with divergent immune histories. Blood samples were collected from either mRNA vaccinees or from those who suffered from breakthrough infections of Alpha/Delta with multiple time intervals following vaccination. Findings: Omicron was highly resistant to neutralization in fully vaccinated individuals without a history of breakthrough infections. In contrast, robust cross-neutralization against Omicron was induced in vaccinees that experienced breakthrough infections. The time interval between vaccination and infection, rather than the variant types of infection, was significantly correlated with the magnitude and potency of Omicron-neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions: Immune histories with breakthrough infections can overcome the resistance to infection by Omicron, with the vaccination-infection interval being the key determinant of the magnitude and breadth of neutralization. The diverse exposure history in each individual warrants a tailored and cautious approach to understanding population immunity against Omicron and future variants. Funding: This study was supported by grants from the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED).

3.
Antiviral Res ; 201: 105297, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757112

ABSTRACT

Monoclonal antibody therapy is a promising option for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and a cocktail of antibodies (REGN-COV) has been administered to infected patients with a favorable outcome. However, it is necessary to continue generating novel sets of monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing activity because viral variants can emerge that show resistance to the currently utilized antibodies. Here, we isolated a new cocktail of antibodies, EV053273 and EV053286, from peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from convalescent patients infected with wild-type SARS-CoV-2. EV053273 exerted potent antiviral activity against the Wuhan wild-type virus as well as the Alpha and Delta variants in vitro, whereas the antiviral activity of EV053286 was moderate, but it had a wide-range of suppressive activity on the wild-type virus as well as the Alpha, Beta, Delta, Kappa, Omicron BA.1, and BA.2 variants. With the combined use of EV053273 and EV053286, we observed similar inhibitory effects on viral replication as with REGN-COV in vitro. We further assessed their activity in vivo by using a mouse model infected with a recently established viral strain with adopted infectious activity in mice. Independent experiments revealed that the combined use of EV053273 and EV053286 or the single use of each monoclonal antibody efficiently blocked infection in vivo. Together with data showing that these two monoclonal antibodies could neutralize REGN-COV escape variants and the Omicron variant, our findings suggest that the EV053273 and EV053286 monoclonal antibody cocktail is a novel clinically applicable therapeutic candidate for SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Combinations , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313038

ABSTRACT

Effective vaccines are essential for the control of the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently-developed vaccines inducing SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are effective, but the appearance of NAb-resistant S variant viruses is of great concern. A vaccine inducing S-independent or NAb-independent SARS-CoV-2 control may contribute to containment of these variants. Here, we investigated the efficacy of an intranasal vaccine expressing viral non-S antigens against intranasal SARS-CoV-2 challenge in cynomolgus macaques. Nine vaccinated macaques exhibited significantly reduced viral load in nasopharyngeal swabs on day 2 post-challenge compared to nine unvaccinated controls. The viral control in the absence of SARS-CoV-2-specific NAbs was significantly correlated with vaccine-induced viral antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Our results indicate that CD8+ T-cell induction by intranasal vaccination can result in NAb-independent control of SARS-CoV-2 infection, highlighting a potential of vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell responses to contribute to COVID-19 containment.Funding: This work was supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED [JP19fk0108104 to A.K.-T. and JP20nk0101601, JP20jm0110012, JP21fk0410035, JP21fk0108125, and JP21jk0210002 to T.M.]) and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan (JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research [21H02745 to T.M.]).Declaration of Interests: H.I., K.K., R.S., and T.M are the inventors on Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) application for SeV-NME vaccine. Authors have no other conflicts of interest to declare.Ethics Approval Statement: Approval by the Committee on the Ethics of Animal Experiments in NIID (permission number: 520001) under the guidelines for animal experiments in accordance with the Guidelines for Proper Conduct of Animal Experiments established by the Science Council of Japan.

5.
Cell Rep Med ; 3(2): 100520, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633496

ABSTRACT

Effective vaccines are essential for the control of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Currently developed vaccines inducing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike (S)-antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are effective, but the appearance of NAb-resistant S variant viruses is of great concern. A vaccine inducing S-independent or NAb-independent SARS-CoV-2 control may contribute to containment of these variants. Here, we investigate the efficacy of an intranasal vaccine expressing viral non-S antigens against intranasal SARS-CoV-2 challenge in cynomolgus macaques. Seven vaccinated macaques exhibit significantly reduced viral load in nasopharyngeal swabs on day 2 post-challenge compared with nine unvaccinated controls. The viral control in the absence of SARS-CoV-2-specific NAbs is significantly correlated with vaccine-induced, viral-antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Our results indicate that CD8+ T cell induction by intranasal vaccination can result in NAb-independent control of SARS-CoV-2 infection, highlighting a potential of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to contribute to COVID-19 containment.


Subject(s)
Administration, Intranasal/methods , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus M Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Macaca fascicularis , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Treatment Outcome , Vero Cells , Viral Load
6.
Sci Adv ; 8(1): eabh3827, 2022 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612934

ABSTRACT

One safety concern during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine development has been the vaccine-associated enhanced disease, which is characterized by eosinophilic immunopathology and T helper cell type 2 (TH2)­biased immune responses with insufficient neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we established a lethal animal model using BALB/c mice and a mouse-passaged isolate (QHmusX) from a European lineage of SARS-CoV-2. The QHmusX strain induced acute respiratory illness, associated with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema, in TH2-prone adult BALB/c mice, but not in young mice or TH1-prone C57BL/6 mice. We also showed that immunization of adult BALB/c mice with recombinant spike protein without appropriate adjuvant caused eosinophilic immunopathology with TH2-shifted immune response and insufficient neutralizing antibodies after QHmusX infection. This lethal mouse model is useful for evaluating vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease during SARS-CoV-2 infection and may provide new insights into the disease pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2.

7.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-296101

ABSTRACT

Summary There are several recommendations for the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. However, the selection of appropriate PPE for the current situation remains controversial. We measured serum antibody titers for SARS-CoV-2 in 10 participants who were engaged in the operation of charter flights for the evacuation of Japanese residents from Hubei Province. All participants wore PPE in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. A total of 17 samples were tested, and all were seronegative. Hence, we conclude that the current PPE recommendation is effective to protect healthcare workers from SARS-CoV-2 infection.

8.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(7): e1009668, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388961

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection presents clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to fatal respiratory failure. Despite the induction of functional SARS-CoV-2-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in convalescent individuals, the role of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the control of SARS-CoV-2 replication remains unknown. In the present study, we show that subacute SARS-CoV-2 replication can be controlled in the absence of CD8+ T cells in cynomolgus macaques. Eight macaques were intranasally inoculated with 105 or 106 TCID50 of SARS-CoV-2, and three of the eight macaques were treated with a monoclonal anti-CD8 antibody on days 5 and 7 post-infection. In these three macaques, CD8+ T cells were undetectable on day 7 and thereafter, while virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses were induced in the remaining five untreated animals. Viral RNA was detected in nasopharyngeal swabs for 10-17 days post-infection in all macaques, and the kinetics of viral RNA levels in pharyngeal swabs and plasma neutralizing antibody titers were comparable between the anti-CD8 antibody treated and untreated animals. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in the pharyngeal mucosa and/or retropharyngeal lymph node obtained at necropsy on day 21 in two of the untreated group but undetectable in all macaques treated with anti-CD8 antibody. CD8+ T-cell responses may contribute to viral control in SARS-CoV-2 infection, but our results indicate possible containment of subacute viral replication in the absence of CD8+ T cells, implying that CD8+ T-cell dysfunction may not solely lead to viral control failure.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/veterinary , Macaca fascicularis/immunology , Macaca fascicularis/virology , Monkey Diseases/immunology , Monkey Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Kinetics , Lymphocyte Depletion/veterinary , Male , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Replication/immunology
9.
Microbiol Immunol ; 64(1): 33-51, 2020 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262996

ABSTRACT

The spike (S) protein of coronavirus, which binds to cellular receptors and mediates membrane fusion for cell entry, is a candidate vaccine target for blocking coronavirus infection. However, some animal studies have suggested that inadequate immunization against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces a lung eosinophilic immunopathology upon infection. The present study evaluated two kinds of vaccine adjuvants for use with recombinant S protein: gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which are expected to function as both an antigen carrier and an adjuvant in immunization; and Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, which have previously been shown to be an effective adjuvant in an ultraviolet-inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine. All the mice immunized with more than 0.5 µg S protein without adjuvant escaped from SARS after infection with mouse-adapted SARS-CoV; however, eosinophilic infiltrations were observed in the lungs of almost all the immunized mice. The AuNP-adjuvanted protein induced a strong IgG response but failed to improve vaccine efficacy or to reduce eosinophilic infiltration because of highly allergic inflammatory responses. Whereas similar virus titers were observed in the control animals and the animals immunized with S protein with or without AuNPs, Type 1 interferon and pro-inflammatory responses were moderate in the mice treated with S protein with and without AuNPs. On the other hand, the TLR agonist-adjuvanted vaccine induced highly protective antibodies without eosinophilic infiltrations, as well as Th1/17 cytokine responses. The findings of this study will support the development of vaccines against severe pneumonia-associated coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gold/chemistry , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Lung/immunology , Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Analysis of Variance , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Immunization , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic , Vero Cells , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Viral Vaccines/pharmacology , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use
10.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 8(4)2020 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902683

ABSTRACT

The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was identified in 2012 and causes severe and often fatal acute respiratory illness in humans. No approved prophylactic and therapeutic interventions are currently available. In this study, we have developed egg yolk antibodies (immunoglobulin Y (IgY)) specific for MERS-CoV spike protein (S1) in order to evaluate their neutralizing efficiency against MERS-CoV infection. S1-specific immunoglobulins were produced by injecting chickens with purified recombinant S1 protein of MERS-CoV at a high titer (5.7 mg/mL egg yolk) at week 7 post immunization. Western blotting and immune-dot blot assays demonstrated that the IgY antibody specifically bound to the MERS-CoV S1 protein. Anti-S1 antibodies were also able to recognize MERS-COV inside cells, as demonstrated by an immunofluorescence assay. Plaque reduction and microneutralization assays showed the neutralization of MERS-COV in Vero cells by anti-S1 IgY antibodies and non-significantly reduced virus titers in the lungs of MERS-CoV-infected mice during early infection, with a nonsignificant decrease in weight loss. However, a statistically significant (p = 0.0196) quantitative reduction in viral antigen expression and marked reduction in inflammation were observed in lung tissue. Collectively, our data suggest that the anti-MERS-CoV S1 IgY could serve as a potential candidate for the passive treatment of MERS-CoV infection.

11.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(1): 120-122, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-753273

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Information on the effectiveness of personal protective equipment (PPE) for preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among healthcare workers (HCWs), especially among HCWs with frequent contact with patients with SARS-CoV-2, is limited. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study on 49 HCWs who worked in close contact with patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. HCWs had blood samples taken every 2 weeks to test for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using two different types of assay. RESULTS: Forty-nine participants (31 nurses, 15 doctors, 3 other workers) were enrolled. In total, 112 blood samples are obtained from participants. The median work days in 2 weeks was 9 (interquartile range (IQR): 5-10) days. In a single work day, 30 of the 49 participants (61.5%) had contact with patients with suspected or conformed SARS-CoV-2 at least 8 times, and approximately 60% of participants had more than 10 min of contact with a single patient. The median self-reported compliance to PPE was 90% (IQR: 80-100%). Seven participants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); however, none were seropositive for SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody, so the positive ELISA results were assumed to be false-positive. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides evidence that appropriate PPE is sufficient to prevent infection amongHCWs. It is necessary to establish a system that provides a stable supply of PPE for HCWs to perform their duties.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Personnel , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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